Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Tender

Tend′er

,
Noun.
[From
Tend
to attend. Cf.
Attender
.]
1.
One who tends; one who takes care of any person or thing; a nurse.
2.
(Naut.)
A vessel employed to attend other vessels, to supply them with provisions and other stores, to convey intelligence, or the like.
3.
A car attached to a locomotive, for carrying a supply of fuel and water.

Ten′der

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Tendered
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Tendering
.]
[F.
tendre
to stretch, stretch out, reach, L.
tendere
. See
Tend
to move.]
1.
(Law)
To offer in payment or satisfaction of a demand, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture;
as, to
tender
the amount of rent or debt
.
2.
To offer in words; to present for acceptance.
You see how all conditions, how all minds, . . .
tender
down
Their services to Lord Timon.
Shakespeare

Ten′der

,
Noun.
1.
(Law)
An offer, either of money to pay a debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture, which would be incurred by nonpayment or nonperformance;
as, the
tender
of rent due, or of the amount of a note, with interest
.
☞ To constitute a legal tender, such money must be offered as the law prescribes. So also the tender must be at the time and place where the rent or debt ought to be paid, and it must be to the full amount due.
2.
Any offer or proposal made for acceptance;
as, a
tender
of a loan, of service, or of friendship; a
tender
of a bid for a contract.
A free, unlimited
tender
of the gospel.
South.
3.
The thing offered; especially, money offered in payment of an obligation.
Shak.
Legal tender
.
See under
Legal
.
Tender of issue
(Law)
,
a form of words in a pleading, by which a party offers to refer the question raised upon it to the appropriate mode of decision.
Burrill.

Ten′der

,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Tenderer
;
sup
erl.
Tenderest
.]
[F.
tendre
, L.
tener
; probably akin to
tenuis
thin. See
Thin
.]
1.
Easily impressed, broken, bruised, or injured; not firm or hard; delicate;
as,
tender
plants;
tender
flesh;
tender
fruit
.
2.
Sensible to impression and pain; easily pained.
Our bodies are not naturally more
tender
than our faces.
L’Estrange.
3.
Physically weak; not hardly or able to endure hardship; immature; effeminate.
The
tender
and delicate woman among you.
Deut. xxviii. 56.
4.
Susceptible of the softer passions, as love, compassion, kindness; compassionate; pitiful; anxious for another's good; easily excited to pity, forgiveness, or favor; sympathetic.
The Lord is very pitiful, and of
tender
mercy.
James v. 11.
I am choleric by my nature, and
tender
by my temper.
Fuller.
5.
Exciting kind concern; dear; precious.
I love Valentine,
Whose life's as
tender
to me as my soul!
Shakespeare
6.
Careful to save inviolate, or not to injure; – with of.
Tender of property.”
Burke.
The civil authority should be
tender
of the honor of God and religion.
Tillotson.
7.
Unwilling to cause pain; gentle; mild.
You, that are thus so
tender
o'er his follies,
Will never do him good.
Shakespeare
8.
Adapted to excite feeling or sympathy; expressive of the softer passions; pathetic;
as,
tender
expressions;
tender
expostulations; a
tender
strain
.
9.
Apt to give pain; causing grief or pain; delicate;
as, a
tender
subject
.
“Things that are tender and unpleasing.”
Bacon.
10.
(Naut.)
Heeling over too easily when under sail; – said of a vessel.
Tender
is sometimes used in the formation of self-explaining compounds;
as,
tender
-footed,
tender
-looking,
tender
-minded,
tender
-mouthed, and the like
.
Syn. – Delicate; effeminate; soft; sensitive; compassionate; kind; humane; merciful; pitiful.

Ten′der

,
Noun.
[Cf. F.
tendre
.]
Regard; care; kind concern.
[Obs.]
Shak.

Ten′der

,
Verb.
T.
To have a care of; to be tender toward; hence, to regard; to esteem; to value.
[Obs.]
For first, next after life, he
tendered
her good.
Spenser.
Tender
yourself more dearly.
Shakespeare
To see a prince in want would move a miser's charity. Our western princes
tendered
his case, which they counted might be their own.
Fuller.

Webster 1828 Edition


Tender

TEND'ER

,
Noun.
[from tend.] One that attends or takes care of; a nurse.
1.
A small vessel employed to attend a larger one for supplying her with provisions and other stores, or to convey intelligence and the like.
2.
In law, an offer, either of money to pay a debt, or of service to be performed, in order to save a penalty or forfeiture which would be incurred by non-payment or non-performance; as the tender of rent due, or of the amount of a note or bond with interest. To constitute a legal tender, such money must be offered as the law prescribes; the offer of bank notes is not a legal tender. So also the tender must be at the time and place where the rent or debt ought to be paid, and it must be to the full amount due.
There is also a tender of issue in pleadings, a tender of an oath, &c.
3.
Any offer for acceptance. The gentleman made me a tender of his services.
4.
The thing offered. This money is not a legal tender.
5.
Regard; kind concern. [Not in use.]

TEND'ER

,
Verb.
T.
[L. tendo.]
1.
To offer in words; or to exhibit or present for acceptance.
All conditions, all minds tender down
Their service to lord Timon.
2.
To hold; to esteem.
Tender yourself more dearly. [Not in use.]
3.
To offer in payment or satisfaction of a demand, for saving a penalty or forfeiture; as, to tender the amount of rent or debt.

Definition 2021


tender

tender

See also: tênder

English

Adjective

tender (comparative tenderer, superlative tenderest)

  1. Sensitive or painful to the touch.
    • 1597, William Shakespeare, All's Well that Ends Well, 3,2:
      [] poore Lord, is't I
      That chaſe thee from thy Countrie, and expoſe
      Thoſe tender limbes of thine []
    • 2006, Mike Myers (as the voice of the title character), Shrek (movie)
      Be careful: that area is tender.
  2. Easily bruised or injured; not firm or hard; delicate.
    tender plants; tender flesh; tender fruit
  3. Physically weak; not able to endure hardship.
    • Bible, Deuteronomy xxviii. 56
      the tender and delicate woman among you
  4. (of food) Soft and easily chewed.
    • 2001, Joey Pantolino (character), The Matrix (movie)
      The Matrix is telling my brain this steak is tender, succulent, and juicy.
  5. Sensible to impression and pain; easily pained.
    • L'Estrange
      Our bodies are not naturally more tender than our faces.
  6. Fond, loving, gentle, sweet.
    Suzanne was such a tender and sweet mother to her children.
    • Bible, James v. 11
      The Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.
    • Shakespeare
      You, that are thus so tender o'er his follies, / Will never do him good.
    • Fuller
      I am choleric by my nature, and tender by my temper.
  7. Adapted to excite feeling or sympathy; expressive of the softer passions; pathetic.
    tender expressions; tender expostulations; a tender strain
  8. Apt to give pain; causing grief or pain; delicate.
    a tender subject
    • Francis Bacon
      Things that are tender and unpleasing.
  9. (nautical) Heeling over too easily when under sail; said of a vessel.
  10. (obsolete) Exciting kind concern; dear; precious.
    • Shakespeare
      I love Valentine, / Whose life's as tender to me as my soul!
  11. (obsolete) Careful to keep inviolate, or not to injure; used with of.
    • Burke
      tender of property
    • Tillotson
      The civil authority should be tender of the honour of God and religion.
Synonyms
  • (soft, yielding, delicate): nesh
  • See also Wikisaurus:affectionate
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

tender (third-person singular simple present tenders, present participle tendering, simple past and past participle tendered)

  1. (now rare) To make tender or delicate; to weaken.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, vol.I, New York, 2001, p.233:
      To such as are wealthy, live plenteously, at ease, […] these viands are to be forborne, if they be inclined to, or suspect melancholy, as they tender their healths […].
    • c. 1947, Putnam Fadeless Dyes [flyer packaged with granulated dye]:
      Putnam Fadeless Dyes will not injure any material. Boiling water does tender some materials. […] Also, silk fibers are very tender when wet and care should be take not to boil them too vigorously.
  2. to feel tenderly towards; to regard fondly.

Noun

tender (countable and uncountable, plural tenders)

  1. (obsolete) Regard; care; kind concern.
  2. The inner flight muscle (pectoralis minor) of poultry.

Etymology 2

From tend + -er.

Noun

tender (plural tenders)

  1. (obsolete) Someone who tends or waits on someone.
  2. (rail transport) A railroad car towed behind a steam engine to carry fuel and water.
    • 1938, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, New York: D. Appleton-Century, 1943, Chapter XII, p. 201,
      Half the coal was out of the tender, half the fire out of the box, half the trucks were off the track, so violent was the stopping.
  3. (nautical) A naval ship that functions as a mobile base for other ships.
    submarine tender
    destroyer tender
  4. (nautical) A smaller boat used for transportation between a large ship and the shore.
    • 2015 April 1, Teresa Machan, “Queen Elizabeth passenger dies boarding a cruise ship tender [print version: Queen Elizabeth passenger dies after boarding mishap, 4 April 2015, p. T5]”, in The Daily Telegraph (Travel), archived from the original on 13 April 2015:
      A passenger on Cunard's Queen Elizabeth died this week following an accident while boarding from a tender (the small boats that carry passengers from ship to shore or port when the cruise ship anchors at sea). [] Gangway ramps can, on occasion, break free of either the ship or the tender, causing passengers or crew to fall into the sea.
Synonyms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle French tendre (stretch out).

Verb

tender (third-person singular simple present tenders, present participle tendering, simple past and past participle tendered)

  1. (formal) To offer, to give.
    to tender one’s resignation
    • Shakespeare
      You see how all conditions, how all minds, [] tender down / Their services to Lord Timon.
    • 1864 November 21, Abraham Lincoln (signed) or John Hay, letter to Mrs. Bixby in Boston
      I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save.
  2. to offer a payment, as at sales or auctions.
    In business law, a tender offer is an invitation to shareholders of a corporation to tender, or exchange, their shares in return for a monetary buy-out.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

tender (plural tenders)

  1. A means of payment such as a check or cheque, cash or credit card.
    Your credit card has been declined so you need to provide some other tender such as cash.
    legal tender
  2. (law) A formal offer to buy or sell something.
    We will submit our tender to you within the week.
  3. Any offer or proposal made for acceptance.
Translations
See also

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ten‧der

Etymology

Borrowing from English tender.

Noun

tender m (plural tenders, diminutive tendertje n)

  1. (finance) tender
  2. (rail transport) coal-car

Synonyms


Italian

Verb

tender

  1. apocopic form of tendere

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛndɛr/

Noun

tender m inan

  1. tender (a railroad car towed behind a steam engine to carry fuel)

Declension


Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin tendere, present active infinitive of tendō.

Pronunciation

Verb

tender (first-person singular present indicative tendo, past participle tendido)

  1. to tend
  2. to trend

Conjugation


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin tendere, present active infinitive of tendō.

Verb

tender (first-person singular present tiendo, first-person singular preterite tendí, past participle tendido)

  1. (transitive) to spread, to stretch out
  2. (transitive) to lay (cable)
  3. (transitive) to make (a bed)
  4. (transitive) to hang up (clothes)
  5. (transitive) to build (a bridge across an expanse)
  6. (transitive) to extend (the hand)
  7. (transitive) to floor (with a punch), to stretch out
  8. (transitive) to cast (a net)
  9. (transitive) to set (a trap)
  10. (transitive) to coat (with plaster)
  11. (intransitive) to tend to, to have a tendency
  12. (reflexive) to lay oneself down

Conjugation

  • Rule: e becomes ie in stressed syllables.

Related terms