Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Shore

Shore

,
imp.
of
Shear
.
Chaucer.

Shore

,
Noun.
A sewer.
[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]

Shore

,
Noun.
[OE.
schore
; akin to LG.
schore
, D.
schoor
, OD.
schoore
, Icel.
skor[GREEK]a
, and perhaps to E.
shear
, as being a piece cut off.]
A prop, as a timber, placed as a brace or support against the side of a building or other structure; a prop placed beneath anything, as a beam, to prevent it from sinking or sagging.
[Written also
shoar
.]

Shore

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Shored
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Shoring
.]
[OE.
schoren
. See
Shore
a prop.]
To support by a shore or shores; to prop; – usually with up;
as, to
shore
up a building
.

Shore

,
Noun.
[OE.
schore
, AS.
score
, probably fr.
scieran
, and so meaning properly, that which is shorn off, edge; akin to OD.
schoore
,
schoor
. See
Shear
,
Verb.
T.
]
The coast or land adjacent to a large body of water, as an ocean, lake, or large river.
Michael Cassio,
Lieutenant to the warlike Moor Othello,
Is come
shore
.
Shakespeare
The fruitful
shore
of muddy Nile.
Spenser.
In shore
,
near the shore.
Marryat.
On shore
.
See under
On
.
Shore birds
(Zool.)
,
a collective name for the various limicoline birds found on the seashore.
Shore crab
(Zool.)
,
any crab found on the beaches, or between tides, especially any one of various species of grapsoid crabs, as
Heterograpsus nudus
of California.
Shore lark
(Zool.)
,
a small American lark (
Otocoris alpestris
) found in winter, both on the seacoast and on the Western plains. Its upper parts are varied with dark brown and light brown. It has a yellow throat, yellow local streaks, a black crescent on its breast, a black streak below each eye, and two small black erectile ear tufts. Called also
horned lark
.
Shore plover
(Zool.)
,
a large-billed Australian plover (
Esacus magnirostris
). It lives on the seashore, and feeds on crustaceans, etc.
Shore teetan
(Zool.)
,
the rock pipit (
Anthus obscurus
).
[Prov. Eng.]

Shore

,
Verb.
T.
To set on shore.
[Obs.]
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Shore

SHORE

, the old. pret. of shear. Obs.

SHORE

,
Noun.
The coast or land adjacent to the sea, or to a large lake or river. This word is applied primarily to land contiguous to water; but it extends to the ground near the border of the sea or of a lake, which is covered with water. We also use the word to express the land near the border of the sea or of a great lake, to an indefinite extent; as when we say, a town stands on the shore. We do not apply the word to land contiguous to a small stream. This we call a bank.

SHORE

,
Noun.
[The popular but corrupt pronunciation of sewer; a pronunciation that should be carefully avoided.]

SHORE

,
Noun.
A prop; a butress; something that supports a building or other thing.

SHORE

,
Verb.
T.
1. To prop; to support by a post or butress; usually withsup; as, to shore up a building.
2. To set on shore. [Not in use.]

Definition 2022


Shore

Shore

See also: shore

English

Proper noun

Shore

  1. A topographic surname.

Anagrams

shore

shore

See also: Shore

English

Noun

shore (plural shores)

  1. Land adjoining a non-flowing body of water, such as an ocean, lake or pond.
    lake shore;  bay shore;  gulf shore;  island shore;  mainland shore;  river shore;  estuary shore;  pond shore;  sandy shore;  rocky shore
    • Edmund Spenser (c.1552–1599)
      the fruitful shore of muddy Nile
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges [] : or anon we shot into a clearing, with a colored glimpse of the lake and its curving shore far below us.
  2. (from the perspective of one on a body of water) Land, usually near a port.
    The seamen were serving on shore instead of in ships.
    The passengers signed up for shore tours.
Usage notes
  • Generally, only the largest of rivers, which are often estuaries, are said to have shores.
  • Rivers and other flowing bodies of water are said to have banks.
  • River bank(s) outnumbers River shore(s) about 200:3 at COCA.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

shore (third-person singular simple present shores, present participle shoring, simple past and past participle shored)

  1. (obsolete) To set on shore.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Etymology 2

Of uncertain origin, but found in some other Germanic languages. Compare Middle Dutch schooren (to prop up, support), Old Norse skorða (piece of timber set up as a support). [1]

Noun

shore (plural shores)

  1. A prop or strut supporting the weight or flooring above it.
    The shores stayed upright during the earthquake.

Verb

shore (third-person singular simple present shores, present participle shoring, simple past and past participle shored)

  1. (transitive, without up) To provide with support.
    • 1990, Christopher Gravett, Richard Hook, Medieval siege warfare, page 45:
      If houses were present these could be used to conceal the mine opening. As the mine progressed the roof was shored with timbers.
    • 1993, Jim Trefethen, Wooden Boat Renovation: New Life for Old Boats Using Modern Methods, page 106:
      Sometimes it's easier to laminate the strips one at a time, shoring each in place only long enough for the epoxy to set.
    • 1999, Vincent J. M. Di Maio, Gunshot Wounds, page 94:
      These are called shored exit wounds. They are characterized by a broad, irregular band of abrasion of the skin around the exit. In such wounds the skin is reinforced, or "shored," by a firm surface at the instant the bullet exits.
    • 1999, William P. Spence, Carpentry & Building Construction: A Do-It-Yourself Guide, page 14:
      It must provide the same degree of protection offered by a complete shoring system. Shoring Excavations Shallow trenches can be shored using wood sheet piling braced by stringers and rakers
  2. (usually with up) To reinforce (something at risk of failure).
    My family shored me up after I failed the GED.
    The workers were shoring up the dock after part of it fell into the water.
    • 1811, Robert Kerr, A general history of voyages and travels to the end of the 18th century, volume 3, page 342:
      ... but his caravels were so much worm-eaten and shattered by storms that he could not reach that island, and was forced to run them on shore in a creek on the coast of Jamaica, where he shored them upright with spars
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

See shear.

Verb

shore

  1. simple past tense of shear

Etymology 4

Noun

shore (plural shores)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) A sewer.

References

  1. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shore?s=t

Anagrams