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Webster 1913 Edition


Knowledge

Knowl′edge

,
Noun.
[OE.
knowlage
,
knowlege
,
knowleche
,
knawleche
. The last part is the Icel. suffix
-leikr
, forming abstract nouns, orig. the same as Icel.
leikr
game, play, sport, akin to AS.
lāc
, Goth.
laiks
dance. See
Know
, and cf.
Lake
,
Verb.
I.
,
Lark
a frolic.]
1.
The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition.
Knowledge
, which is the highest degree of the speculative faculties, consists in the perception of the truth of affirmative or negative propositions.
Locke.
2.
That which is or may be known; the object of an act of knowing; a cognition; – chiefly used in the plural.
There is a great difference in the delivery of the mathematics, which are the most abstracted of
knowledges
.
Bacon.
Knowledges
is a term in frequent use by Bacon, and, though now obsolete, should be revived, as without it we are compelled to borrow “cognitions” to express its import.
Sir W. Hamilton.
To use a word of Bacon’s, now unfortunately obsolete, we must determine the relative value of
knowledges
.
H. Spencer.
3.
That which is gained and preserved by knowing; instruction; acquaintance; enlightenment; learning; scholarship; erudition.
Knowledge
puffeth up, but charity edifieth.
1 Cor. viii. 1.
Ignorance is the curse of God;
Knowledge
, the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.
Shakespeare
4.
That familiarity which is gained by actual experience; practical skill;
as, a
knowledge
of life
.
Shipmen that had
knowledge
of the sea.
1 Kings ix. 27.
5.
Scope of information; cognizance; notice;
as, it has not come to my
knowledge
.
Why have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldst take
knowledge
of me?
Ruth ii. 10.
Syn. – See
Wisdom
.

Knowl′edge

,
Verb.
T.
To acknowledge.
[Obs.]
“Sinners which knowledge their sins.”
Tyndale.

Webster 1828 Edition


Knowledge

KNOWL'EDGE

,
Noun.
nol'lej.
1.
A clear and certain perception of that which exists, or of truth and fact; the perception of the connection and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy of our ideas.
We can have no knowledge of that which does not exist. God has a perfect knowledge of all his works. Human knowledge is very limited, and is mostly gained by observation and experience.
2.
Learning; illumination of mind.
Ignorance is the curse of God, knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.
3.
Skill; as a knowledge of seamanship.
4.
Acquaintance with any fact or person. I have no knowledge of the man or thing.
5.
Cognizance; notice. Ruth 2.
6.
Information; power of knowing.
7.
Sexual intercourse. But it is usual to prefix carnal; as carnal knowledge.

Definition 2022


Knowledge

Knowledge

See also: knowledge

English

Proper noun

Knowledge

  1. A course of study which must be completed by prospective London taxi drivers; consists of 320 routes through central London and many significant places.
    • 2004, Robert S. Wayne, Royal London in Context: The Independent Traveler's Guide to Royal London, page 177:
      The drivers of the officially licensed "black cabs" are famous for their mastery of "The Knowledge" of London streets.

Quotations

  • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:Knowledge.

knowledge

knowledge

See also: Knowledge

English

Alternative forms

  • (obsolete) knolege, knowlage, knowleche, knowledg, knowlege, knowliche, knowlych, knowlech
  • (obsolete, uncommon, Scottish) knaulege, knaulage, knawlage
  • (obsolete, uncommon) knoleche, knoleige, knowlache, knolych
  • (obsolete, verb) knawlache

Noun

knowledge (usually uncountable, plural knowledges)

  1. The fact of knowing about something; general understanding or familiarity with a subject, place, situation etc. [from 14th c.]
    His knowledge of Iceland was limited to what he'd seen on the Travel Channel.
    • 2013 August 3, The machine of a new soul”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      The yawning gap in neuroscientists’ understanding of their topic is in the intermediate scale of the brain’s anatomy. Science has a passable knowledge of how individual nerve cells, known as neurons, work. It also knows which visible lobes and ganglia of the brain do what. But how the neurons are organised in these lobes and ganglia remains obscure.
  2. Awareness of a particular fact or situation; a state of having been informed or made aware of something. [from 14th c.]
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice:
      He had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring his wife that he should not go; and till the evening after the visit was paid she had no knowledge of it.
  3. Intellectual understanding; the state of appreciating truth or information. [from 14th c.]
    Knowledge consists in recognizing the difference between good and bad decisions.
  4. Familiarity or understanding of a particular skill, branch of learning etc. [from 14th c.]
    Does your friend have any knowledge of hieroglyphs, perchance?
  5. (philosophical) Justified true belief
  6. (archaic or law) Sexual intimacy or intercourse (now usually in phrase carnal knowledge). [from 15th c.]
    • 1573, George Gascoigne, "The Adventures of Master F.J.", An Anthology of Elizabethan Prose Fiction:
      Every time that he had knowledge of her he would leave, either in the bed, or in her cushion-cloth, or by her looking-glass, or in some place where she must needs find it, a piece of money [].
  7. (obsolete) Information or intelligence about something; notice. [15th-18th c.]
    • 1580, Edward Hayes, "Sir Humphrey Gilbert's Voyage to Newfoundland", Voyages and Travels Ancient and Modern, ed. Charles W Eliot, Cosimo 2005, p. 280:
      Item, if any ship be in danger [], every man to bear towards her, answering her with one light for a short time, and so to put it out again; thereby to give knowledge that they have seen her token.
  8. The total of what is known; all information and products of learning. [from 16th c.]
    His library contained the accumulated knowledge of the Greeks and Romans.
  9. (countable) Something that can be known; a branch of learning; a piece of information; a science. [from 16th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essayes, London: Edward Blount, OCLC 946730821, II.12:
      he weakened his braines much, as all men doe, who over nicely and greedily will search out those knowledges [transl. cognoissances], which hang not for their mowing, nor pertaine unto them.
    • Francis Bacon
      There is a great difference in the delivery of the mathematics, which are the most abstracted of knowledges.
  10. (obsolete) Acknowledgement. [14th-16th c.]
  11. (obsolete) Notice, awareness. [17th c.]
    • 1611, The Bible, Authorized Version, Ruth II.10:
      Then she fell on her face, and bowed herself to the ground, and said unto him, Why have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldest take knowledge of me, seeing I am a stranger?
  12. (Britain, informal) The deep familiarity with certain routes and places of interest required by taxicab drivers working in London, England.
    • Malcolm Bobbitt, Taxi! - The Story of the London Cab
      There is only one sure way to memorise the runs and that is to follow them, either on foot, cycle or motor cycle; hence, the familiar sight of would-be cabbies learning the knowledge during evenings and weekends.

Quotations

  • 1996, Jan Jindy Pettman, Worlding Women: A feminist international politics, pages ix-x:
    There are by now many feminisms (Tong, 1989; Humm, 1992). [] They are in shifting alliance or contest with postmodern critiques, which at times seem to threaten the very category 'women' and its possibilities for a feminist politics. These debates inform this attempt at worlding womenmoving beyond white western power centres and their dominant knowledges [].

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “knowledge”: extensive, deep, superficial, theoretical, practical, useful, working, encyclopedic, public, private, scientific, tacit, explicit, general, specialized, special, broad, declarative, procedural, innate, etc.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

knowledge (third-person singular simple present knowledges, present participle knowledging, simple past and past participle knowledged)

  1. (obsolete) To confess as true; to acknowledge. [13th-17th c.]
    • 1526, Bible, tr. William Tyndale, Matthew 3:
      Then went oute to hym Jerusalem, and all Jury, and all the region rounde aboute Jordan, and were baptised of hym in Jordan, knoledging their synnes.

See also

External links

  • knowledge in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • knowledge in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: living · view · although · #533: knowledge · hath · table · daughter