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Webster 1913 Edition


Hall

Hall

(ha̤l)
,
Noun.
[OE.
halle
,
hal
, AS.
heal
,
heall
; akin to D.
hal
, OS. & OHG.
halla
, G.
halle
, Icel.
höll
, and prob. from a root meaning, to hide, conceal, cover. See
Hell
,
Helmet
.]
1.
A building or room of considerable size and stateliness, used for public purposes;
as, Westminster
Hall
, in London
.
2.
(a)
The chief room in a castle or manor house, and in early times the only public room, serving as the place of gathering for the lord’s family with the retainers and servants, also for cooking and eating. It was often contrasted with the
bower
, which was the private or sleeping apartment.
Hence, as the entrance from outside was directly into the hall:
(b)
A vestibule, entrance room, etc., in the more elaborated buildings of later times.
Hence:
(c)
Any corridor or passage in a building.
3.
A name given to many manor houses because the magistrate's court was held in the hall of his mansion; a chief mansion house.
Cowell.
4.
A college in an English university (at Oxford, an unendowed college).
5.
The apartment in which English university students dine in common; hence, the dinner itself;
as,
hall
is at six o'clock
.
Syn. – Entry; court; passage. See
Vestibule
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Hall

HALL

,
Noun.
[L. aula; Heb. a tent, a palace.]
1.
In architecture, a large room at the entrance of a house or palace. In the houses of ministers of state, magistrates, &c.,it is the place where they give audience and dispatch business.
2.
An edifice in which courts of justice are held; as Westminster Hall, which was originally a royal palace,the kings of England formerly holding their parliaments and courts of judicature in their own dwellings, as is still the practice in Spain.
3.
A manor-house, in which courts were formerly held.
4.
A college, or large edifice belonging to a collegiate institution.
5.
A room for a corporation or public assembly; as a town-hall; Fanueil Hall in Boston, &c.
6.
A collegiate body in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

Definition 2021


Hall

Hall

See also: hall, häll, håll, háll, and Häll

English

Proper noun

Hall

  1. A British and Scandinavian topographic surname for someone who lived in or near a hall.
  2. A surname of German origin for someone associated with a salt mine.
  3. An Anglo-Norman surname.
  4. (Britain, rail transport) Hall class, a class of steam locomotives used on the GWR.

German

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -al

Noun

Hall m (genitive Halls, no plural)

  1. echo, resonance, reverberation

Declension


Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɑl/
    Rhymes: -ɑl

Noun

Hall m (plural Hallen)

  1. hallway

See also

hall

hall

See also: háll, håll, Hall, häll, and Häll

English

Noun

hall (plural halls)

  1. A corridor; a hallway.
    The drinking fountain was out in the hall.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 13, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      We tiptoed into the house, up the stairs and along the hall into the room where the Professor had been spending so much of his time.
  2. A meeting room.
    The hotel had three halls for conferences, and two were in use by the convention.
  3. A manor house (originally because a magistrate's court was held in the hall of his mansion).
    The duke lived in a great hall overlooking the sea.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)
  4. A building providing student accommodation at a university.
    The student government hosted several social events so that students from different halls would intermingle.
  5. The principal room of a secular medieval building.
  6. (obsolete) Cleared passageway through a crowd.

Derived terms

Translations


Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *(s)kel- (compare English shallow, Middle High German hel (tired, weak), Ancient Greek σκέλλω (skéllō, to dry up), σκληρός (sklērós, hard, harsh)).[1]

Noun

hall m (indefinite plural halle, definite singular halli, definite plural hallet)

  1. trouble

References

  1. Orel, Vladimir (1998), hall”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, page 141

Danish

Etymology

Borrowing from English hall.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [hɒːl]

Noun

hall c (singular definite hallen, plural indefinite haller)

  1. hall (a corridor or a hallway)

Inflection


Estonian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finnic *halla, from pre-Finnic *šalna, from Proto-Balto-Slavic [Term?]. Compare Latvian salna and Lithuanian šalna.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑlː/

Noun

hall (genitive halla, partitive halla)

  1. frost
Declension

Etymology 2

From Proto-Finnic *halli (compare Finnish halli), from Balto-Slavic. Compare Latvian salnis, Lithuanian šalnis (off-white, roan)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑlʲː/

Adjective

hall (genitive halli, partitive halli)

  1. grey (color)
Declension
Derived terms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑlʲː/

Noun

hall (genitive halli, partitive halli)

  1. hall (large room or building)
Declension

French

Noun

hall m (plural halls)

  1. hall

German

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -al

Verb

hall

  1. Imperative singular of hallen.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of hallen.

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhɒlː]

Etymology 1

From Old Hungarian hadl (hear), from Proto-Uralic *kontale- (compare Finnish kuunnella); compare also Proto-Uralic *kule-.

Verb

hall

  1. (intransitive) to hear (to perceive sounds through the ear)
  2. (transitive) to hear (to perceive with the ear)
    Hallottam egy hangot a szobából. ― I heard a sound from the room.
Conjugation
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowing from German Halle.[1]

Noun

hall (plural hallok)

  1. lounge
Declension
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hall hallok
accusative hallt hallokat
dative hallnak halloknak
instrumental hallal hallokkal
causal-final hallért hallokért
translative hallá hallokká
terminative hallig hallokig
essive-formal hallként hallokként
essive-modal
inessive hallban hallokban
superessive hallon hallokon
adessive hallnál halloknál
illative hallba hallokba
sublative hallra hallokra
allative hallhoz hallokhoz
elative hallból hallokból
delative hallról hallokról
ablative halltól halloktól
Possessive forms of hall
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hallom halljaim
2nd person sing. hallod halljaid
3rd person sing. hallja halljai
1st person plural hallunk halljaink
2nd person plural hallotok halljaitok
3rd person plural halljuk halljaik

References

  1. Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowing from English hall.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈʁɔw/

Noun

hall m (plural halls)

  1. (architecture) lobby; entrance hall (room in a building used for entry from the outside)

Derived terms


Spanish

Noun

hall m (plural halls)

  1. hall, lobby, lounge

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse hǫll, from Proto-Germanic *hallō, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel-. Compare English hall. Related to Latin cella and English cellar.[1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hal/

Noun

hall c

  1. a lounge
  2. a corridor
  3. short for any of the words:
    1. simhall
    2. ishall
    3. sporthall
    4. verkstadshall
    5. mässhall

Declension

Inflection of hall 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hall hallen hallar hallarna
Genitive halls hallens hallars hallarnas

References

  1. hall in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)