Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Sentence

Sen′tence

,
Noun.
[F., from L.
sententia
, for
sentientia
, from
sentire
to discern by the senses and the mind, to feel, to think. See
Sense
,
Noun.
, and cf.
Sentiensi
.]
1.
Sense; meaning; significance.
[Obs.]
Tales of best
sentence
and most solace.
Chaucer.
The discourse itself, voluble enough, and full of
sentence
.
Milton.
2.
(a)
An opinion; a decision; a determination; a judgment, especially one of an unfavorable nature.
My
sentence
is for open war.
Milton.
That by them [Luther’s works] we may pass
sentence
upon his doctrines.
Atterbury.
(b)
A philosophical or theological opinion; a dogma;
as, Summary of the
Sentences
; Book of the
Sentences
.
3.
(Law)
In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a court or judge; condemnation pronounced by a judicial tribunal; doom. In common law, the term is exclusively used to denote the judgment in criminal cases.
Received the
sentence
of the law.
Shakespeare
4.
A short saying, usually containing moral instruction; a maxim; an axiom; a saw.
Broome.
5.
(Gram.)
A combination of words which is complete as expressing a thought, and in writing is marked at the close by a period, or full point. See
Proposition
, 4.
Sentences are simple or compound. A simple sentence consists of one subject and one finite verb; as, “The Lord reigns.” A compound sentence contains two or more subjects and finite verbs, as in this verse: -
He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.
Pope.
Dark sentence
,
a saying not easily explained.
A king . . . understanding
dark sentences
.
Dan. vii. 23.

Sen′tence

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Sentenced
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Sentencing
.]
1.
To pass or pronounce judgment upon; to doom; to condemn to punishment; to prescribe the punishment of.
Nature herself is
sentenced
in your doom.
Dryden.
2.
To decree or announce as a sentence.
[Obs.]
Shak.
3.
To utter sententiously.
[Obs.]
Feltham.

Webster 1828 Edition


Sentence

SEN'TENCE

,
Noun.
[from L. sententia, from sentio, to think.]
1. In law, a judgement pronounced by a court or judge upon a criminal; a jdicial decision publicly and officially declared in a criminal prosecution. In technical language, sentence is used only for the declaration of judgement against the convicted of a crime. In civil cases, the decision of the court is called a judgement. In criminal cases, sentence is a judgement pronounced; doom.
2. In language not technical, a determination or decision given, particularly a decision that condemns, ar an unfavorable determination.
Let him be sent out lome of Luther's works, that by them we may pass sentence upon his doctrines. Atterbury.
3. An opinion; judgement concerning a controverted point.
4. A maxim; an axiom; a short saying containing moral instruction.
5. Vindication of one's innocence.
6. In grammar, a period; a number of words containing a complete sense or sentiment, and followed by a full pause. Sentences are simple or compound. A simple sentence consists of one subject and one finite verb; as, 'the Lord reigns.' A compound sentence two or more subjects and finite verbs, as in this verse,
He fills, he bounds, connects and equals all. Pope.

Definition 2021


sentence

sentence

English

Noun

sentence (plural sentences)

  1. (obsolete) Sense; meaning; significance.
    • Milton
      The discourse itself, voluble enough, and full of sentence.
  2. (obsolete) One's opinion; manner of thinking. [14th-17th c.]
    • Milton
      My sentence is for open war.
  3. (now rare) A pronounced opinion or judgment on a given question. [from 14th c.]
    • Atterbury
      By them [Luther's works] we may pass sentence upon his doctrines.
  4. (dated) The decision or judgement of a jury or court; a verdict. [from 14th c.]
    The court returned a sentence of guilt in the first charge, but innocence in the second.
  5. The judicial order for a punishment to be imposed on a person convicted of a crime. [from 14th c.]
    The judge declared a sentence of death by hanging for the infamous cattle rustler.
  6. A punishment imposed on a person convicted of a crime.
  7. (obsolete) A saying, especially form a great person; a maxim, an apophthegm. [14th-19th c.]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Broome to this entry?)
  8. (grammar) A grammatically complete series of words consisting of a subject and predicate, even if one or the other is implied, and typically beginning with a capital letter and ending with a full stop. [from 15th c.]
    The children were made to construct sentences consisting of nouns and verbs from the list on the chalkboard.
  9. (logic) A formula with no free variables. [from 20th c.]
  10. (computing theory) Any of the set of strings that can be generated by a given formal grammar. [from 20th c.]

Synonyms

Hypernyms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

sentence (third-person singular simple present sentences, present participle sentencing, simple past and past participle sentenced)

  1. To declare a sentence on a convicted person; to doom; to condemn to punishment.
    The judge sentenced the embezzler to ten years in prison, along with a hefty fine.
    • Dryden
      Nature herself is sentenced in your doom.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      The murderer, he recalled, had been tried and sentenced to imprisonment for life, but was pardoned by a merciful governor after serving a year of his sentence.
  2. (obsolete) To decree or announce as a sentence.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) To utter sententiously.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Feltham to this entry?)

Translations


Czech

Noun

sentence f

  1. sentence (formula with no free variables)
  2. sentence (grammar)

Declension

Synonyms


French

Etymology

From Old French, from Latin sententia.

Pronunciation

Noun

sentence f (plural sentences)

  1. sentence
  2. verdict
  3. maxim, saying, adage

Latvian

Noun

sentence f (5th declension)

  1. aphorism
  2. maxim

Declension

Synonyms

  • aforisms
  • domu grauds

Middle French

Etymology

Latin sententia.

Noun

sentence f (plural sentences)

  1. sentence (judgement; verdict)
    • 1532, François Rabelais, Pantagruel:
      [] puis retourna s'asseoir et commença pronuncer la sentence comme s'ensuyt :
      [] then went back and sat down and started to give the verdict as follows:
  2. sentence (grammatically complete series of words)
    • 1552, François Rabelais, Le Tiers Livre:
      tant a cause des amphibologies, equivocques, & obscuritez des motz, que de la briefveté des sentences