Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Shed

Shed

(shĕd)
,
Noun.
[The same word as
shade
. See
Shade
.]
1.
A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure often open in front; an outbuilding; a hut;
as, a wagon
shed
; a wood
shed
.
The first Aletes born in lowly
shed
.
Fairfax.
Sheds
of reeds which summer’s heat repel.
Sandys.

Shed

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Shed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Shedding
.]
[OE.
scheden
,
sch[GREEK]den
, to pour, to part, AS.
scādan
,
sceádan
, to pert, to separate; akin to OS.
sk[GREEK][GREEK]an
, OFries. sk[GREEK]tha, G.
scheiden
, OHG.
sceidan
, Goth.
skaidan
, and probably to Lith.
skëdu
I part, separate, L.
scindere
to cleave, to split, Gr. [GREEK][GREEK][GREEK], Skr.
chid
, and perch. also to L.
caedere
to cut. √159. Cf.
Chisel
,
Concise
,
Schism
,
Sheading
,
Sheath
,
Shide
.]
1.
To separate; to divide.
[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
Robert of Brunne.
2.
To part with; to throw off or give forth from one's self; to emit; to diffuse; to cause to emanate or flow; to pour forth or out; to spill;
as, the sun
sheds
light; she
shed
tears; the clouds
shed
rain
.
Did Romeo's hand
shed
Tybalt's blood?
Shakespeare
Twice seven consenting years have
shed

Their utmost bounty on thy head.
Wordsworth.
3.
To let fall; to throw off, as a natural covering of hair, feathers, shell; to cast;
as, fowls
shed
their feathers; serpents
shed
their skins; trees
shed
leaves
.
4.
To cause to flow off without penetrating;
as, a tight roof, or covering of oiled cloth,
sheeds
water
.
5.
To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.
[R.]
“Her hair . . . is shed with gray.”
B. Jonson.
6.
(Weaving)
To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.

Shed

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To fall in drops; to pour.
[Obs.]
Such a rain down from the welkin
shadde
.
Chaucer.
2.
To let fall the parts, as seeds or fruit; to throw off a covering or envelope.
White oats are apt to
shed
most as they lie, and black as they stand.
Mortimer.

Shed

,
Noun.
1.
A parting; a separation; a division.
[Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
They say also that the manner of making the
shed
of newwedded wives' hair with the iron head of a javelin came up then likewise.
Sir T. North.
2.
The act of shedding or spilling; – used only in composition, as in bloodshed.
3.
That which parts, divides, or sheds; – used in composition, as in watershed.
4.
(Weaving)
The passageway between the threads of the warp through which the shuttle is thrown, having a sloping top and bottom made by raising and lowering the alternate threads.

Webster 1828 Edition


Shed

SHED

,
Verb.
T.
pret. and pp. shed.
1. To pour out; to effuse; to spill; to suffer to flow out; as, to shed tears; to shed blood. The sun sheds light on the earth; the stars shed a more feeble light.
This is my blood of the New Testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. Matt. 26.
2. To let fall; to cast; as, the trees shed their leaves on autumn; fowls shed their fethers; and serpents shed their skin.
3. To scatter to emit; to throw off; to diffuse; as, flowers shed their sweets of fragrance.

SHED

,
Verb.
I.
To let fall its parts.
White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.

Definition 2022


shed

shed

See also: she'd

English

Verb

shed (third-person singular simple present sheds, present participle shedding, simple past and past participle shed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, Britain, dialectal) To part, separate or divide.
    To shed something in two.
    To shed the sheep from the lambs.
    A metal comb shed her golden hair.
    We are shed with each other by an enormous distance.
    Our politicians fand to shed us, not to bring us into onehead.
    • Geoffrey Chaucer, Boece (c.1380)
      If there be any thing that knitteth himself to the ilk middle point [of a circle], it is constrained into simplicity (that is to say, into unmovablity), and it ceaseth to be shed and to flit diversely.
    • The Poems of Robert Henryson (1500)
      The northern wind had shed the misty clouds from the sky;
    • Select Practical Writings of David Dickson (1635)
      Lest ye shed with God.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Robert of Brunne to this entry?)
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To part with, separate from, leave off; cast off, let fall, be divested of.
    You must shed your fear of the unknown before you can proceed.
    When we found the snake, it was in the process of shedding its skin.
    • Mortimer
      White oats are apt to shed most as they lie, and black as they stand.
    • 2012 November 2, Ken Belson, "," New York Times (retrieved 2 November 2012):
      She called on all the marathoners to go to Staten Island to help with the clean-up effort and to bring the clothes they would have shed at the start to shelters or other places where displaced people were in need.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To pour; to make flow.
    • Shakespeare
      Did Romeo's hand shed Tybalt's blood?
  4. (transitive) To allow to flow or fall.
    I didn't shed many tears when he left me.
    A tarpaulin sheds water.
  5. (transitive) To radiate, cast, give off (light); see also shed light on.
    Can you shed any light on this problem?
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To pour forth, give off, impart.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts II:
      Sence now that he by the right honde of god exalted is, and hath receaved off the father the promys off the holy goost, he hath sheed forthe that which ye nowe se and heare.
  7. (obsolete, intransitive) To fall in drops; to pour.
    • Chaucer
      Such a rain down from the welkin shadde.
  8. To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.
    • Ben Jonson
      Her hair [] is shed with grey.
  9. (weaving) To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English schede, schode, schad, shæd, from Old English scēada (a parting of the hair, top of the head), alteration of earlier *scǣdel, from Proto-Germanic *skaidilō (part in the hair, crown of the head). Cognate with Dutch schedel (skull), German Scheitel (hair parting).

Alternative forms

  • shode (dialectal)
  • shead, shede (obsolete)

Noun

shed (plural sheds)

  1. (weaving) An area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven.
  2. (obsolete) A distinction or dividing-line.
  3. (obsolete) A parting in the hair.
  4. (obsolete) The top of the head.
  5. (obsolete) An area of land as distinguished from those around it.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Variant of shade.

Noun

A typical wooden shed on an allotment in Britain

shed (plural sheds)

  1. A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut.
    a wagon shed; a wood shed; a garden shed
  2. (Britain, derogatory, informal) An automobile which is old, worn-out, slow, or otherwise of poor quality.
  3. (Britain, rail transportation) A British Rail Class 66 locomotive.
    • 2000 December 11, Bruce Garbutt, “Re: DRS to Cardiff (was Re: Tractor via Eddiestown)”, in uk.railway, Usenet[https://groups.google.com/forum/#!search/"pair$20of$20sheds"$20"railway"/uk.railway/lxy5N44SaKc/nflurV1OAGAJ]:
      Never saw that but we did stand and watch a pair of Sheds (156 and 165) speed north on a loaded steel.
Derived terms
Translations

See also

Anagrams


Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • shedu

Etymology

From Latin sedeō. Compare Daco-Romanian ședea, șed.

Verb

shed (third-person singular present indicative shadi/shade, past participle shidzutã)

  1. I sit.

Related terms

  • shideari/shideare
  • shidzut

See also