Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Wound

Wound

,
imp.
&
p.
p.
of
Wind
to twist, and
Wind
to sound by blowing.

Wound

(?; 277)
,
Noun.
[OE.
wounde
,
wunde
, AS.
wund
; akin to OFries.
wunde
, OS.
wunda
, D.
wonde
, OHG.
wunta
, G.
wunde
, Icel.
und
, and to AS., OS., & G.
wund
sore, wounded, OHG.
wunt
, Goth.
wunds
, and perhaps also to Goth.
winnan
to suffer, E.
win
. √140. Cf. Zounds.]
1.
A hurt or injury caused by violence; specifically, a breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or in the substance of any creature or living thing; a cut, stab, rent, or the like.
Chaucer.
Showers of blood
Rained from the
wounds
of slaughtered Englishmen.
Shakespeare
2.
Fig.: An injury, hurt, damage, detriment, or the like, to feeling, faculty, reputation, etc.
3.
(Criminal Law)
An injury to the person by which the skin is divided, or its continuity broken; a lesion of the body, involving some solution of continuity.
☞ Walker condemns the pronunciation woond as a “capricious novelty.” It is certainly opposed to an important principle of our language, namely, that the Old English long sound written ou, and pronounced like French ou or modern English oo, has regularly changed, when accented, into the diphthongal sound usually written with the same letters ou in modern English, as in ground, hound, round, sound. The use of ou in Old English to represent the sound of modern English oo was borrowed from the French, and replaced the older and Anglo-Saxon spelling with u. It makes no difference whether the word was taken from the French or not, provided it is old enough in English to have suffered this change to what is now the common sound of ou; but words taken from the French at a later time, or influenced by French, may have the French sound.
Wound gall
(Zool.)
,
an elongated swollen or tuberous gall on the branches of the grapevine, caused by a small reddish brown weevil (
Ampeloglypter sesostris
) whose larvae inhabit the galls.

Wound

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Wounded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Wounding
.]
[AS.
wundian
. √140. See
Wound
,
Noun.
]
1.
To hurt by violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like.
The archers hit him; and he was sore
wounded
of the archers.
1 Sam. xxxi. 3.
2.
To hurt the feelings of; to pain by disrespect, ingratitude, or the like; to cause injury to.
When ye sin so against the brethren, and
wound
their weak conscience, ye sin against Christ.
1 Cor. viii. 12.

Webster 1828 Edition


Wound

WOUND

,
Noun.
[G.]
1.
A breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or of the bark and wood of a tree, or of the bark and substance of other plants, caused by violence or external force. The self-healing power of living beings, animal or vegetable, by which the parts separated in wounds, tend to unite and become sound, is a remarkable proof of divine benevolence and wisdom.
2.
Injury; hurt; as a wound given to credit or reputation.

WOUND

,
Verb.
T.
To hurt by violence; as, to wound the head or the arm; to wound a tree.
He was wounded for our transgressions. Isaiah 53.

WOUND

, pret. and pp. of wind.

Definition 2021


wound

wound

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: wo͞ond, IPA(key): /wuːnd/
  • (US) enPR: wo͞ond, IPA(key): /wund/
  • Rhymes: -uːnd

Noun

wound (plural wounds)

  1. An injury, such as a cut, stab, or tear, to a (usually external) part of the body.
    • 2013, Phil McNulty, "", BBC Sport, 1 September 2013:
      The visitors were without Wayne Rooney after he suffered a head wound in training, which also keeps him out of England's World Cup qualifiers against Moldova and Ukraine.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      Showers of blood / Rained from the wounds of slaughtered Englishmen.
    • 1883: Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      I went below, and did what I could for my wound; it pained me a good deal, and still bled freely; but it was neither deep nor dangerous, nor did it greatly gall me when I used my arm.
  2. (figuratively) A hurt to a person's feelings, reputation, prospects, etc.
    It took a long time to get over the wound of that insult.
  3. (criminal law) An injury to a person by which the skin is divided or its continuity broken.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

wound (third-person singular simple present wounds, present participle wounding, simple past and past participle wounded)

  1. (transitive) To hurt or injure (someone) by cutting, piercing, or tearing the skin.
    The police officer wounded the suspect during the fight that ensued.
  2. (transitive) To hurt (a person's feelings).
    The actor's pride was wounded when the leading role went to his rival.
Synonyms
Translations

Etymology 2

See wind (Etymology 2)

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /waʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Verb

wound

  1. simple past tense and past participle of wind
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 1, in The Fate of the Artemis:
      “[…] Captain Markam had been found lying half-insensible, gagged and bound, on the floor of the sitting-room, his hands and feet tightly pinioned, and a woollen comforter wound closely round his mouth and neck ; whilst Mrs. Markham's jewel-case, containing valuable jewellery and the secret plans of Port Arthur, had disappeared. […]”