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Webster 1913 Edition


Strip

Strip

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Stripped
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Stripping
.]
[OE.
stripen
,
strepen
, AS.
str[GREEK]pan
in be
str[GREEK]pan
to plunder; akin to D.
stroopen
, MHG.
stroufen
, G.
streifen
.]
1.
To deprive; to bereave; to make destitute; to plunder; especially, to deprive of a covering; to skin; to peel;
as, to
strip
a man of his possession, his rights, his privileges, his reputation; to
strip
one of his clothes; to
strip
a beast of his skin; to
strip
a tree of its bark.
And
strippen
her out of her rude array.
Chaucer.
They
stripped
Joseph out of his coat.
Gen. xxxvii. 23.
Opinions which . . . no clergyman could have avowed without imminent risk of being
stripped
of his gown.
Macaulay.
2.
To divest of clothing; to uncover.
Before the folk herself
strippeth
she.
Chaucer.
Strip
your sword stark naked.
Shakespeare
3.
(Naut.)
To dismantle;
as, to
strip
a ship of rigging, spars, etc.
4.
(Agric.)
To pare off the surface of, as land, in strips.
5.
To deprive of all milk; to milk dry; to draw the last milk from; hence, to milk with a peculiar movement of the hand on the teats at the last of a milking;
as, to
strip
a cow
.
6.
To pass; to get clear of; to outstrip.
[Obs.]
When first they
stripped
the Malean promontory.
Chapman.
Before he reached it he was out of breath,
And then the other
stripped
him.
Beau. & Fl.
7.
To pull or tear off, as a covering; to remove; to wrest away;
as, to
strip
the skin from a beast; to
strip
the bark from a tree; to
strip
the clothes from a man’s back; to
strip
away all disguisses.
To
strip
bad habits from a corrupted heart, is
stripping
off the skin.
Gilpin.
8.
(Mach.)
(a)
To tear off (the thread) from a bolt or nut;
as, the thread is
stripped
.
(b)
To tear off the thread from (a bolt or nut);
as, the bolt is
stripped
.
9.
To remove the metal coating from (a plated article), as by acids or electrolytic action.
10.
(Carding)
To remove fiber, flock, or lint from; – said of the teeth of a card when it becomes partly clogged.
11.
To pick the cured leaves from the stalks of (tobacco) and tie them into “hands”; to remove the midrib from (tobacco leaves).

Strip

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To take off, or become divested of, clothes or covering; to undress.
2.
(Mach.)
To fail in the thread; to lose the thread, as a bolt, screw, or nut. See
Strip
,
Verb.
T.
, 8.

Strip

,
Noun.
1.
A narrow piece, or one comparatively long;
as, a
strip
of cloth; a
strip
of land.
2.
(Mining)
A trough for washing ore.
3.
(Gunnery)
The issuing of a projectile from a rifled gun without acquiring the spiral motion.
Farrow.

Webster 1828 Edition


Strip

STRIP

,
Verb.
T.
[G., to strip, to flay, to stripe or streak, to graze upon, to swerve, ramble or stroll. L.]
1.
To pull or tear off, as a covering; as, to strip the skin from a beast; to strip the bark from a tree; to strip the clothes from a mans back.
2.
To deprive of a covering; to skin; to peel; as, to strip a beast of his skin; to strip a tree of its bark; to strip a man of his clothes.
3.
To deprive; to bereave; to make destitute; as, to strip a man of his possessions.
4.
To divest; as, to strip one of his rights and privileges. Let us strip this subject of all its adventitious glare.
5.
To rob; to plunder; as, robbers strip a house.
6.
To bereave; to deprive; to impoverish; as a man stripped of his fortune.
7.
To deprive; to make bare by cutting, grazing or other means; as cattle strip the ground of its herbage.
8.
To pull off husks; to husk; as, to strip maiz, or the ears of maiz.
9.
To press out the last milk at a milking.
10.
To unrig; as, to strip a ship.
11.
To pare off the surface of land in strips, and turn over the strips upon the adjoining surface.
To strip off,
1.
To pull or take off; as, to strip off a covering; to strip off a mask or disguise.
2.
To cast off. [Not in use.]
3.
To separate from something connected. [Not in use.]
[We may observe the primary sense of this word is to peel or skin, hence to pull off in a long narrow piece; hence stripe.]

STRIP

,
Noun.
[G., a stripe, a streak.]
1.
A narrow piece, comparatively long; as a strip of cloth.
2.
Waste, in a legal sense; destruction of fences, buildings, timber, &c.

Definition 2021


strip

strip

English

Noun

strip (countable and uncountable, plural strips)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Long, thin piece of land, or of any material.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 19, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      At the far end of the houses the head gardener stood waiting for his mistress, and he gave her strips of bass to tie up her nosegay. This she did slowly and laboriously, with knuckly old fingers that shook.
    You use strips of paper in papier mache.   He welded together some pieces of strip.
  2. A comic strip.
  3. A landing strip.
  4. A strip steak.
  5. A street with multiple shopping or entertainment possibilities.
  6. (fencing) The fencing area, roughly 14 meters by 2 meters.
  7. (UK football) the uniform of a football team, or the same worn by supporters.
  8. Striptease.
  9. (mining) A trough for washing ore.
  10. The issuing of a projectile from a rifled gun without acquiring the spiral motion.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Farrow to this entry?)
Derived terms
Hyponyms
  • (long, thin piece of bacon): rasher
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English strepen, strippen, from Old English strīepan (plunder). Probably related to German Strafe (deprivation, fine, punishment)

Verb

strip (third-person singular simple present strips, present participle stripping, simple past and past participle stripped or stript)

  1. (transitive) To remove or take away.
    Norm will strip the old varnish before painting the chair.
  2. (usually intransitive) To take off clothing.
    • 2012 August 21, Pilkington, Ed, “Death penalty on trial: should Reggie Clemons live or die?”, in The Guardian:
      The prosecution case was that the men forced the sisters to strip, threw their clothes over the bridge, then raped them and participated in forcing them to jump into the river to their deaths. As he walked off the bridge, Clemons was alleged to have said: "We threw them off. Let's go."
  3. (intransitive) To perform a striptease.
  4. (transitive) To take away something from (someone or something); to plunder; to divest.
    • Bible, Genesis xxxvii. 23
      They stripped Joseph out of his coat.
    • Macaulay
      opinions which [] no clergyman could have avowed without imminent risk of being stripped of his gown
    • The robbers stripped Norm of everything he owned.
    • 1856: Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
      He was obliged to sell his silver piece by piece; next he sold the drawing-room furniture. All the rooms were stripped; but the bedroom, her own room, remained as before.
    • 2012 April 23, Angelique Chrisafis, “François Hollande on top but far right scores record result in French election”, in the Guardian:
      The lawyer and twice-divorced mother of three had presented herself as the modern face of her party, trying to strip it of unsavoury overtones after her father's convictions for saying the Nazi occupation of France was not "particularly inhumane".
      #* 2013, Paul Harris, Lance Armstrong faces multi-million dollar legal challenges after confession (in The Guardian, 19 January 2013)
      After the confession, the lawsuits. Lance Armstrong's extended appearance on the Oprah Winfrey network, in which the man stripped of seven Tour de France wins finally admitted to doping, has opened him up to several multi-million dollar legal challenges.
  5. (transitive) To remove (the thread or teeth) from a ****, nut, or gear.
    The thread is stripped.
    The **** is stripped.
  6. (intransitive) To fail in the thread; to lose the thread, as a bolt, ****, or nut.
  7. (transitive) To remove color from hair, cloth, etc. to prepare it to receive new color.
  8. (transitive, bridge) To remove all cards of a particular suit from another player. (See also, strip-squeeze.)
  9. (transitive) To empty (tubing) by applying pressure to the outside of (the tubing) and moving that pressure along (the tubing).
  10. (transitive) To milk a cow, especially by stroking and compressing the teats to draw out the last of the milk.
  11. (television, transitive) To run a television series at the same time daily (or at least on Mondays to Fridays), so that it appears as a strip straight across the weekly schedule.
  12. (transitive, agriculture) To pare off the surface of (land) in strips.
  13. (transitive, obsolete) To pass; to get clear of; to outstrip.
    • Chapman
      when first they stripped the Malean promontory
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Before he reached it he was out of breath, / And then the other stripped him.
  14. To remove the metal coating from (a plated article), as by acids or electrolytic action.
  15. To remove fibre, flock, or lint from; said of the teeth of a card when it becomes partly clogged.
  16. To pick the cured leaves from the stalks of (tobacco) and tie them into "hands".
  17. To remove the midrib from (tobacco leaves).
Synonyms
Quotations
  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:strip.
Derived terms
Translations
References
  • OED 2nd edition 1989
  • Funk&Wagnalls Standard College Dictionary

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology

From English strip.

Noun

strip m (plural strips, diminutive stripje n)

  1. strip (long thin piece)
  2. comic (a cartoon story)

Synonyms

  • (strip): strook
  • (comic): beeldverhaal

Derived terms

Verb

strip

  1. first-person singular present indicative of strippen
  2. imperative of strippen

Portuguese

Noun

strip m (plural strips)

  1. Abbreviation of striptease.

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strîp/

Etymology

From English strip.

Noun

strȉp m (Cyrillic spelling стри̏п)

  1. comic (a cartoon story)

Declension