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Webster 1913 Edition


Wash

Wash

(wŏsh)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Washed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Washing
.]
[OE.
waschen
, AS.
wascan
; akin to D.
wasschen
, G.
waschen
, OHG.
wascan
, Icel. & Sw.
vaska
, Dan.
vaske
, and perhaps to E.
water
. √150.]
1.
To cleanse by ablution, or dipping or rubbing in water; to apply water or other liquid to for the purpose of cleansing; to scrub with water, etc., or as with water;
as, to
wash
the hands or body; to
wash
garments; to
wash
sheep or wool; to
wash
the pavement or floor; to
wash
the bark of trees.
When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, . . . he took water and
washed
his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person.
Matt. xxvii. 24.
2.
To cover with water or any liquid; to wet; to fall on and moisten; hence, to overflow or dash against;
as, waves
wash
the shore
.
Fresh-blown roses
washed
with dew.
Milton.
[The landscape]
washed
with a cold, gray mist.
Longfellow.
3.
To waste or abrade by the force of water in motion;
as, heavy rains
wash
a road or an embankment
.
4.
To remove by washing to take away by, or as by, the action of water; to drag or draw off as by the tide; – often with away, off, out, etc.;
as, to
wash
dirt from the hands
.
Arise, and be baptized, and
wash
away thy sins.
Acts xxii. 16.
The tide will
wash
you off.
Shakespeare
5.
To cover with a thin or watery coat of color; to tint lightly and thinly.
6.
To overlay with a thin coat of metal;
as, steel
washed
with silver
.
To wash gold
, etc.,
to treat earth or gravel, or crushed ore, with water, in order to separate the gold or other metal, or metallic ore, through their higher density.
To wash the hands of
.
See under
Hand
.

Wash

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To perform the act of ablution.
Wash
in Jordan seven times.
2 Kings v. 10.
2.
To clean anything by rubbing or dipping it in water; to perform the business of cleansing clothes, ore, etc., in water.
“She can wash and scour.”
Shak.
3.
To bear without injury the operation of being washed;
as, some calicoes do not
wash
.
[Colloq.]
4.
To be wasted or worn away by the action of water, as by a running or overflowing stream, or by the dashing of the sea; – said of road, a beach, etc.

Wash

,
Noun.
1.
The act of washing; an ablution; a cleansing, wetting, or dashing with water; hence, a quantity, as of clothes, washed at once.
2.
A piece of ground washed by the action of a sea or river, or sometimes covered and sometimes left dry; the shallowest part of a river, or arm of the sea; also, a bog; a marsh; a fen;
as, the
washes
in Lincolnshire
.
“The Wash of Edmonton so gay.”
Cowper.
These Lincoln
washes
have devoured them.
Shakespeare
3.
Substances collected and deposited by the action of water;
as, the
wash
of a sewer, of a river, etc.
The
wash
of pastures, fields, commons, and roads, where rain water hath a long time settled.
Mortimer.
4.
Waste liquid, the refuse of food, the collection from washed dishes, etc., from a kitchen, often used as food for pigs.
Shak.
5.
(Distilling)
(a)
The fermented wort before the spirit is extracted.
(b)
A mixture of dunder, molasses, water, and scummings, used in the West Indies for distillation.
B. Edwards.
6.
That with which anything is washed, or wetted, smeared, tinted, etc., upon the surface.
Specifically:
(a)
A liquid cosmetic for the complexion.
(b)
A liquid dentifrice.
(c)
A liquid preparation for the hair;
as, a hair
wash
.
(d)
A medical preparation in a liquid form for external application; a lotion.
(e)
(Painting)
A thin coat of color, esp. water color.
7.
(Naut.)
(a)
The blade of an oar, or the thin part which enters the water.
(b)
The backward current or disturbed water caused by the action of oars, or of a steamer’s screw or paddles, etc.
8.
The flow, swash, or breaking of a body of water, as a wave; also, the sound of it.
9.
Ten strikes, or bushels, of oysters.
[Prov. Eng.]
Wash ball
,
a ball of soap to be used in washing the hands or face.
Swift.
Wash barrel
(Fisheries)
,
a barrel nearly full of split mackerel, loosely put in, and afterward filled with salt water in order to soak the blood from the fish before salting.
Wash bottle
.
(Chem.)
(a)
A bottle partially filled with some liquid through which gases are passed for the purpose of purifying them, especially by removing soluble constituents.
(b)
A washing bottle. See under
Washing
.
Wash gilding
.
Wash leather
,
split sheepskin dressed with oil, in imitation of chamois, or shammy, and used for dusting, cleaning glass or plate, etc.; also, alumed, or buff, leather for soldiers' belts.

Wash

,
Adj.
1.
Washy; weak.
[Obs.]
Their bodies of so weak and
wash
a temper.
Beau. & Fl.
2.
Capable of being washed without injury; washable;
as,
wash
goods
.
[Colloq.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Wash

WASH

,
Verb.
T.
[G.]
1.
To cleanse by ablution, or by rubbing in water; as, to wash the hands or the body; to wash garments.
2.
To wet; to fall on and moisten; as, the rain washes the flowers or plants.
3.
To overflow. The tides wash the meadows.
4.
To overflow or dash against; to cover with water; as, the waves wash the strand or shore; the sea washes the rocks on the shore or beach.
5.
To scrub in water; as, to wash a deck or a floor.
6.
To separate extraneous matter from; as, to wash ore; to wash grain.
7.
In painting, to lay a color over any work with a pencil, to give it the proper tints, and make it appear more natural. Thus work is washed with a pale red to imitate brick, &c.
8.
To rub over with some liquid substance; as, to wash trees fro removing insects or diseases.
9.
To squeeze and cleanse in water; as, to wash wool. So sheep are said to be washed, when they are immersed in water and their wool squeezed, by which means it is cleansed.
10.
To cleanse by a current of water; as, showers wash the streets.
11.
To overlay with a thin coat of metal; as steel washed with silver.
12.
To purify from the pollution of sin.
But ye are washed, but ye are sanctified. 1 Corinthians 6.
To wash a ship, to bring all her guns to one side to make her heel, and then to wash and scrape her side.

WASH

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To perform the act of ablution.
Wash in Jordan seven times. 2 Kings 5. [Elliptical.]
2.
To perform the business of cleansing clothes in water.
She can wash and scour.
To wash off, in calico-printing, to soak and rinse printed calicoes, to dissolve and remove the gum and paste.

WASH

,
Noun.
1.
Alluvial matter; substances collected and deposited by water; as the wash of a river.
2.
A bog; a marsh; a fen.
Neptunes salt wash.
3.
A cosmetic; as a wash for the face, to help the complexion.
4.
A lotion; a medical liquid preparation for external application.
5.
A superficial stain or color.
6.
Waste liquor of a kitchen for hogs.
7.
The act of washing the clothes of a family; or the whole quantity washed at once. There is a great wash, or a small wash.
8.
With distillers, the fermentable liquor made b dissolving the proper subject for fermentation and distillation in common water. In the distillery of malt, the wash is made by mixing the water hot, with the malt ground into meal.
9.
The shallow part of a river, or arm of the sea; as the wastes in Lincolnshire.
10.
The blade of an oar; the thin part, which enters the water and by whose impulse the boat is moved.
11.
The color laid on a picture to vary its tints.
12.
A substance laid on boards or other work for beauty or preservation.
13.
A thin coat of metal.
14.
In the west Indies, a mixture of dunder, molasses, water and scummings, for distillation.

Definition 2022


Wash

Wash

See also: wash, WASH, and Wash.

English

Proper noun

the Wash

  1. The square-mouthed estuary on the northwest margin of East Anglia in England.

wash

wash

See also: Wash, WASH, and Wash.

English

Verb

wash (third-person singular simple present washes, present participle washing, simple past and past participle washed)

  1. To clean with water.
    The car is so dirty, we need to wash it.
    Dishwashers wash dishes much more efficiently than most humans.
    • 1917, Lester Angell Round, Harold Locke Lang, Preservation of vegetables by fermentation and salting, page 9
      Wash the vegetables, drain off the surplus water, and pack them in a keg, crock, or other utensil until it is nearly full
    • 1971, Homemaking Handbook: For Village Workers in Many Countries, page 101
      If using celery or okra, wash the vegetables in safe water.
    • 2010, Catherine Abbott, The Everything Grow Your Own Vegetables Book: Your Complete Guide to planting, tending, and harvesting vegetables, Everything Books (ISBN 9781440500145), page 215
      Wash the vegetables thoroughly; even a little dirt can contain bacteria. Wash vegetables individually under running water.
  2. (transitive) To move or erode by the force of water in motion.
    Heavy rains wash a road or an embankment.
    The flood washed away houses.
  3. (mining) To separate valuable material (such as gold) from worthless material by the action of flowing water.
  4. (intransitive) To clean oneself with water.
    I wash every morning after getting up.
  5. (transitive) To cover with water or any liquid; to wet; to fall on and moisten.
    Waves wash the shore.
    • Milton
      fresh-blown roses washed with dew
    • Longfellow
      [the landscape] washed with a cold, grey mist
  6. (intransitive) To move with a lapping or swashing sound; to lap or splash.
    to hear the water washing
  7. (intransitive) To be eroded or carried away by the action of water.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To be cogent, convincing; to withstand critique.
  9. (intransitive) To bear without injury the operation of being washed.
    Some calicoes do not wash.
  10. (intransitive) To be wasted or worn away by the action of water, as by a running or overflowing stream, or by the dashing of the sea; said of road, a beach, etc.
  11. To cover with a thin or watery coat of colour; to tint lightly and thinly.
  12. To overlay with a thin coat of metal.
    steel washed with silver
  13. (transitive) To cause dephosphorization of (molten pig iron) by adding substances containing iron oxide, and sometimes manganese oxide.
  14. (transitive) To pass (a gas or gaseous mixture) through or over a liquid for the purpose of purifying it, especially by removing soluble constituents.

Usage notes

In older works and possibly still in some dialects, wesh and woosh may be found as past tense forms. Washen may be found as a past participle.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

wash (plural washes)

A drawing and wash by Samuel Wallis entitled York Island (c. 1767)
  1. The process or an instance of washing or being washed by water or other liquid.
    I'm going to have a quick wash before coming to bed.
    My jacket needs a wash.
  2. A liquid used for washing.
  3. The quantity of clothes washed at a time.
    There's a lot in that wash: maybe you should split it into two piles.
  4. (art) A smooth and translucent painting created using a paintbrush holding a large amount of solvent and a small amount of paint.
  5. The sound of breaking of the seas, e.g., on the shore.
    I could hear the wash of the wave.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 16,
      [] the wind in the cordage and the wash of the sea helped the more to put them beyond earshot []
  6. The wake of a moving ship.
    The ship left a big wash
    Sail away from the wash to avoid rocking the boat.
    • 2003, Guidelines for Managing Wake Wash from High-speed Vessels: Report of Working Group 41 of the Maritime Navigation Commission, PIANC (ISBN 9782872231423), page 5
      To date, much of the research undertaken on high-speed vessel wake wash has appeared only as unpublished reports for various authorities and management agencies.
  7. The turbulence left in the air by a moving airplane.
  8. A lotion or other liquid with medicinal or hygienic properties.
    mouth wash
    hand wash
  9. Ground washed away to the sea or a river.
    • Mortimer
      The wash of pastures, fields, commons, and roads, where rain water hath a long time settled.
  10. A piece of ground washed by the action of water, or sometimes covered and sometimes left dry; the shallowest part of a river, or arm of the sea; also, a bog; a marsh.
    • Shakespeare
      These Lincoln washes have devoured them.
  11. A shallow body of water.
  12. In arid and semi-arid regions, the normally dry bed of an intermittent or ephemeral stream; an arroyo or wadi.
    • 1997, Stanley Desmond Smith, et al. Physiological Ecology of North American Desert Plants, Nature
      In some desert-wash systems (which have been termed “xero-riparian”)
    • 1999, Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, A Natural History of the Sonoran Desert
      ...though the wash may carry surface water for only a few hours a year.
    • 2005, Le Hayes, Pilgrims in the Desert: The Early History of the East Mojave Desert
      Rock Spring Wash continues a short distance then joins Watson Wash. Water from Rock Spring comes out of the boulder strewn wash and disappears into the sand
  13. A situation in which losses and gains or advantages and disadvantages are equivalent; a situation in which there is no net change.
    • 2003, David Brenner, I Think There's a Terrorist in My Soup, page 100:
      I knew that for every vote I cast for, say, the Republicans, some kid at a polling place nearby was casting his votes for the Democrats, so it was probably a wash or close to it.
  14. Waste liquid, the refuse of food, the collection from washed dishes, etc., from a kitchen, often used as food for pigs; pigwash.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  15. In distilling, the fermented wort before the spirit is extracted.
  16. A mixture of dunder, molasses, water, and scummings, used in the West Indies for distillation.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of B. Edwards to this entry?)
  17. A thin coat of metal laid on anything for beauty or preservation.
  18. (nautical) The blade of an oar.
  19. The backward current or disturbed water caused by the action of oars, or of a steamer's **** or paddles, etc.
  20. Ten strikes, or bushels, of oysters.
  21. (architecture) The upper surface of a member or material when given a slope to shed water; hence, a structure or receptacle shaped so as to receive and carry off water.
    a carriage wash in a stable

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

See also

  • WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene)