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Webster 1913 Edition


Deprive

De-prive′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Deprived
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Depriving
.]
[LL.
deprivare
,
deprivatium
, to divest of office; L.
de-
+
privare
to bereave, deprive: cf. OF.
depriver
. See
Private
.]
1.
To take away; to put an end; to destroy.
[Obs.]
’Tis honor to deprive
dishonored
life.
Shakespeare
2.
To dispossess; to bereave; to divest; to hinder from possessing; to debar; to shut out from; – with a remoter object, usually preceded by of.
God hath
deprived
her of wisdom.
Job xxxix. 17.
It was seldom that anger
deprived
him of power over himself.
Macaulay.
3.
To divest of office; to depose; to dispossess of dignity, especially ecclesiastical.
Syn. – To strip; despoil; rob; abridge.

Webster 1828 Edition


Deprive

DEPRIVE

,
Verb.
T.
[L. To take away.]
1.
To take from; to bereave of something possessed or enjoyed; followed by of; as, to deprive a man of sight; to deprive one of strength, of reason, or of property. This has a general signification, applicable to a lawful or unlawful taking.
God hath deprived her of wisdom. Job 39.

Definition 2022


deprive

deprive

See also: déprivé and déprive

English

Verb

deprive (third-person singular simple present deprives, present participle depriving, simple past and past participle deprived)

  1. To take something away (and keep it away); deny someone of something.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 260a.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum , The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      "By means of the Golden Cap I shall command the Winged Monkeys to carry you to the gates of the Emerald City," said Glinda, "for it would be a shame to deprive the people of so wonderful a ruler."
      If we had been deprived of it, the most serious consequence would be that we'd be deprived of philosophy.

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