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Webster 1913 Edition


Soak

Soak

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Soaked
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Soaking
.]
[OE.
soken
, AS.
socian
to sioak, steep, fr.
s[GREEK]can
,
s[GREEK]gan
, to suck. See
Suck
.]
1.
To cause or suffer to lie in a fluid till the substance has imbibed what it can contain; to macerate in water or other liquid; to steep, as for the purpose of softening or freshening;
as, to
soak
cloth; to
soak
bread; to
soak
salt meat, salt fish, or the like.
2.
To drench; to wet thoroughly.
Their land shall be
soaked
with blood.
Isa. xxiv. 7.
3.
To draw in by the pores, or through small passages;
as, a sponge
soaks
up water; the skin
soaks
in moisture.
4.
To make (its way) by entering pores or interstices; – often with through.
The rivulet beneath
soaked
its way obscurely through wreaths of snow.
Sir W. Scott.
5.
Fig.: To absorb; to drain.
[Obs.]
Sir H. Wotton.

Soak

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To lie steeping in water or other liquid; to become sturated;
as, let the cloth lie and
soak
.
2.
To enter (into something) by pores or interstices;
as, water
soaks
into the earth or other porous matter
.
3.
To drink intemperately or gluttonously.
[Slang]

Webster 1828 Edition


Soak

SOAK

, v.t.
1.
To steep; to cause or suffer to lie in a fluid till the substance has imbibed what it can contain; to macerate in water or other fluid; as, to soak cloth; to soak bread.
2.
To drench; to wet thoroughly. The earth is soaked with heavy rain. Their land shall be soaked with blood. Is. 34.
3.
To draw in by the pores; as the skin.
4.
To drain. [Not authirized.]

SOAK

, v.i.
1.
To lie steeped in water or other fluid. Let the cloth lie and soak.
2.
To enter into pores or interstices. Water soaks into the earth or other porous matter.
3.
To drink intemperately or gluttonously; to drench; as a soaking club. [Low.]

Definition 2022


soak

soak

English

Verb

soak (third-person singular simple present soaks, present participle soaking, simple past and past participle soaked)

  1. (intransitive) To be saturated with liquid by being immersed in it.
    I'm going to soak in the bath for a couple of hours.
    • Bible, Isaiah xxiv. 7
      Their land shall be soaked with blood.
  2. (transitive) To immerse in liquid to the point of saturation or thorough permeation.
    Soak the beans overnight before cooking.
  3. (intransitive) To penetrate or permeate by saturation.
    The water soaked into my shoes and gave me wet feet.
    • Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
      The rivulet beneath soaked its way obscurely through wreaths of snow.
  4. (transitive) To allow (especially a liquid) to be absorbed; to take in, receive. (usually + up)
    A sponge soaks up water; the skin soaks in moisture.
    I soaked up all the knowledge I could at university.
    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:
      The case was that of a murder. It had an element of mystery about it, however, which was puzzling the authorities. A turban and loincloth soaked in blood had been found; also a staff.
  5. (slang, dated) To drink intemperately or gluttonously.
  6. (metallurgy, transitive) To heat (a metal) before shaping it.
  7. (ceramics, transitive) To hold a kiln at a particular temperature for a given period of time.
    We should soak the kiln at cone 9 for half an hour.
  8. (figuratively, transitive) To absorb; to drain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir H. Wotton to this entry?)
    • 1928, Upton Sinclair, Boston
      It's a blackmail ring, and the district attorneys get a share of the loot. [] Well, they got him in the same kind of jam, and soaked him to the tune of three hundred and eighty-six thousand.

Translations

Noun

soak (plural soaks)

  1. An immersion in water etc.
    • "After the climb, I had a nice long soak in a bath."
  2. (slang, Britain) A drunkard.
  3. (Australia) A low-lying depression that fills with water after rain.
    • 1985, Peter Carey, Illywhacker, Faber & Faber 2003, p. 38:
      I set off early to walk along the Melbourne Road where, one of the punters had told me, there was a soak with plenty of frogs in it.

Translations

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