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Webster 1913 Edition


Immerse

Im-merse′

,
Adj.
[L.
immersus
, p. p. of
immergere
. See
Immerge
.]
Immersed; buried; hid; sunk.
[Obs.]
“Things immerse in matter.”
Bacon.

Im-merse′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Immersed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Immersing
.]
1.
To plunge into anything that surrounds or covers, especially into a fluid; to dip; to sink; to bury; to immerge.
Deep
immersed
beneath its whirling wave.
J Warton.
More than a mile
immersed
within the wood.
Dryden.
2.
To baptize by immersion.
3.
To engage deeply; to engross the attention of; to involve; to overhelm.
The queen
immersed
in such a trance.
Tennyson.
It is impossible to have a lively hope in another life, and yet be deeply
immersed
inn the enjoyments of this.
Atterbury.

Webster 1828 Edition


Immerse

IMMERSE

,
Verb.
T.
immers'. [L. immersus, from immergo; in and mergo, to plunge.]
1.
To put under water or other fluid; to plunge; to dip.
2.
To sink or cover deep; to cover wholly; as, to be immersed in a wood.
3.
To plunge; to overwhelm; to involve; to engage deeply; as, to immerse in business or cares.
It is impossible for a man to have a lively hope in another life,and yet be deeply immersed in the enjoyment of this.

Definition 2022


immerse

immerse

English

Verb

immerse (third-person singular simple present immerses, present participle immersing, simple past and past participle immersed)

  1. (transitive) To put under the surface of a liquid; to dunk.
    Archimedes determined the volume of objects by immersing them in water.
  2. (transitive) To involve deeply
    The sculptor immersed himself in anatomic studies.
  3. (mathematics) Map into an immersion.
    • 2002, Kari Jormakka, Flying Dutchmen: Motion in Architecture (page 40)
      Thus, in mathematical terms a Klein bottle cannot be "embedded" but only "immersed" in three dimensions as an embedding has no self-intersections but an immersion may have them.

Translations

Synonyms

Derived terms

Adjective

immerse (comparative more immerse, superlative most immerse)

  1. (obsolete) Immersed; buried; sunk.
    • Francis Bacon
      After a long enquiry of things immerse in matter, I interpose some object which is immateriate, or less materiate; such as this of sounds.

Italian

Adjective

immerse f pl

  1. feminine plural of immerso

Verb

immerse

  1. third-person singular past historic of immergere
  2. feminine plural past participle of immergere

Latin

Participle

immerse

  1. vocative masculine singular of immersus