Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Suck

Suck

(sŭk)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Sucked
(sŭkt)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Sucking
.]
[OE.
suken
,
souken
, AS.
sūcan
,
sūgan
; akin to D.
zuigen
, G.
saugen
, OHG.
sūgan
, Icel.
sūga
,
sjūga
, Sw.
suga
, Dan.
suge
, L.
sugere
. Cf.
Honeysuckle
,
Soak
,
Succulent
,
Suction
.]
1.
To draw, as a liquid, by the action of the mouth and tongue, which tends to produce a vacuum, and causes the liquid to rush in by atmospheric pressure; to draw, or apply force to, by exhausting the air.
2.
To draw liquid from by the action of the mouth;
as, to
suck
an orange
; specifically, to draw milk from (the mother, the breast, etc.) with the mouth;
as, the young of an animal
sucks
the mother, or dam; an infant
sucks
the breast
.
3.
To draw in, or imbibe, by any process resembles sucking; to inhale; to absorb;
as, to
suck
in air; the roots of plants
suck
water from the ground
.
4.
To draw or drain.
Old ocean,
sucked
through the porous globe.
Thomson.
5.
To draw in, as a whirlpool; to swallow up.
As waters are by whirlpools
sucked
and drawn.
Dryden.
To suck in
,
to draw into the mouth; to imbibe; to absorb.
To suck out
,
to draw out with the mouth; to empty by suction.
To suck up
,
to draw into the mouth; to draw up by suction or absorption.

Suck

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To draw, or attempt to draw, something by suction, as with the mouth, or through a tube.
Where the bee
sucks
, there
suck
I.
Shakespeare
2.
To draw milk from the breast or udder;
as, a child, or the young of an animal, is first nourished by
sucking
.
3.
To draw in; to imbibe; to partake.
The crown had
sucked
too hard, and now, being full, was like to draw less.
Bacon.

Suck

,
Noun.
1.
The act of drawing with the mouth.
2.
That which is drawn into the mouth by sucking; specifically, mikl drawn from the breast.
Shak.
3.
A small draught.
[Colloq.]
Massinger.
4.
Juice; succulence.
[Obs.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Suck

SUCK

,
Verb.
T.
[L. sugo.]
1.
To draw with the mouth; to draw out, as a liquid from a cask, or milk from the breast; to draw into the mouth. To suck is to exhaust the air of the mouth or of a tube; the fluid then rushes into the mouth or tube by means of the pressure of the surrounding air.
2.
To draw milk from with the mouth; as, the young of an animal sucks the mother or dam, or the breast.
3.
To draw into the mouth; to imbibe; as, to suck in air; to suck the juice of plants.
4.
To draw or drain.
Old ocean suck'd through the porous globe.
5.
To draw in, as a whirlpool; to absorb.
6.
To inhale.
To suck in, to draw into the mouth; to imbibe; to absorb.
To suck out, to draw out with the mouth; to empty by suction.
To suck up, to draw into the mouth.

SUCK

,
Verb.
I.
To draw by exhausting the air, as with the mouth, or with a tube.
1.
To draw the breast; as, a child, or the young of any animal, is first nourished by sucking.
2.
To draw in; to imbibe.

SUCK

,
Noun.
The act of drawing with the mouth.
1.
Milk drawn from the breast by the mouth.

Definition 2021


suck

suck

English

Noun

suck (plural sucks)

  1. An instance of drawing something into one's mouth by inhaling.
    • 2001, D. Martin Doney, Prayer Capsule: A Book of Honesty, page 261
      Bammer agreed “Probably a good idea,” he agreed with a quick suck on his straw, “won't stop you from picking up any of these chicks, though.”
  2. (vulgar) Fellatio of a ****.
    • 2012, Alex Carreras, Cruising with Destiny, page 12
      Nate exhaled a long, slow breath. What the **** was he thinking? He couldn't cruise the steam room looking for married men looking for a quick suck. He needed to shoot his load, but was he really that desperate?
  3. (Canada) A weak, self-pitying person; a person who won't go along, especially out of spite; a crybaby or sore loser.
    • 1999, Hiromi Goto, “Drift”, in Ms., v 9, n 3, p 82–6:
      “Why're you bothering to take her anywhere? I can't stand traveling with her. You're such a suck,” her sister said. Waved her smoke. “No **** way I'm going.”
    • 2008, Beth Hitchcock, “Parenting Pair”, in Today's Parent, v 25, n 5, p 64:
      I used to think she was such a suck! She'd cry when I took to the ice, whether I skated well or badly. She'd cry when I left the house.
  4. A sycophant, especially a child.

Synonyms

Translations

Verb

suck (third-person singular simple present sucks, present participle sucking, simple past and past participle sucked)

  1. (transitive) To use the mouth and lips to pull in (a liquid, especially milk from the breast). [from 9th c.]
  2. (intransitive) To perform such an action; to feed from a breast or teat. [from 11th c.]
  3. (transitive) To put the mouth or lips to (a breast, a mother etc.) to draw in milk. [from 11th c.]
  4. (transitive) To extract, draw in (a substance) from or out of something. [from 14th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.i:
      That she may sucke their life, and drinke their blood, / With which she from her childhood had bene fed.
  5. (transitive) To work the lips and tongue on (an object) to extract moisture or nourishment; to absorb (something) in the mouth. [from 14th c.]
  6. (transitive) To pull (something) in a given direction, especially without direct contact. [from 17th c.]
  7. (transitive, slang, vulgar) To perform fellatio. [from 20th c.]
  8. (intransitive, slang) To be inferior or objectionable: a general term of disparagement, sometimes used with at to indicate a particular area of deficiency. [from 20th c.]
    • 1970, Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in America, Simon and Schuster, p. 251:
      . . . and it has a few very high points . . . but as a novel, it sucks

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (to bring something into the mouth by inhaling): to blow
  • (to be poor at): to rock, to rule

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams


Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɵk/
  • Hyphenation: suck

Noun

suck c

  1. sigh; a deep and prolonged audible inspiration or respiration

Declension

Inflection of suck 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative suck sucken suckar suckarna
Genitive sucks suckens suckars suckarnas