Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Light

Light

(līt)
,
Noun.
[OE.
light
,
liht
, AS.
leíht
; akin to OS.
lioht
, D. & G.
licht
, OHG.
lioht
, Goth.
liuhaþ
, Icel.
ljōs
, L.
lux
light,
lucere
to shine, Gr.
λευκόσ
white, Skr.
ruc
to shine. √122. Cf.
Lucid
,
Lunar
,
Luminous
,
Lynx
.]
1.
That agent, force, or action in nature by the operation of which upon the organs of sight, objects are rendered visible or luminous.
Light was regarded formerly as consisting of material particles, or corpuscules, sent off in all directions from luminous bodies, and traversing space, in right lines, with the known velocity of about 186,300 miles per second; but it is now generally understood to consist, not in any actual transmission of particles or substance, but in the propagation of vibrations or undulations in a subtile, elastic medium, or ether, assumed to pervade all space, and to be thus set in vibratory motion by the action of luminous bodies, as the atmosphere is by sonorous bodies. This view of the nature of light is known as the undulatory or wave theory; the other, advocated by Newton (but long since abandoned), as the corpuscular, emission, or Newtonian theory. A more recent theory makes light to consist in electrical oscillations, and is known as the electro-magnetic theory of light.
2.
That which furnishes, or is a source of, light, as the sun, a star, a candle, a lighthouse, etc.
Then he called for a
light
, and sprang in.
Acts xvi. 29.
And God made two great
lights
; the greater
light
to rule the day, and the lesser
light
to rule the night.
Gen. i. 16.
3.
The time during which the light of the sun is visible; day; especially, the dawn of day.
The murderer, rising with the
light
, killeth the poor and needy.
Job xxiv. 14.
4.
The brightness of the eye or eyes.
He seemed to find his way without his eyes;
For out o’door he went without their helps,
And, to the last, bended their
light
on me.
Shakespeare
5.
The medium through which light is admitted, as a window, or window pane; a skylight; in architecture, one of the compartments of a window made by a mullion or mullions.
There were windows in three rows, and
light
was against
light
in three ranks.
I Kings vii.4.
6.
Life; existence.
O, spring to
light
, auspicious Babe, be born !
Pope.
7.
Open view; a visible state or condition; public observation; publicity.
The duke yet would have dark deeds darkly answered; he would never bring them to
light
.
Shakespeare
8.
The power of perception by vision.
My strength faileth me; as for the
light
of my eyes, it also is gone from me.
Ps. xxxviii. 10.
9.
That which illumines or makes clear to the mind; mental or spiritual illumination; enlightenment; knowledge; information.
He shall never know
That I had any
light
of this from thee.
Shakespeare
10.
Prosperity; happiness; joy; felicity.
Then shall thy
light
break forth as the morning, and thy health shall spring forth speedily.
Is. lviii. 8.
11.
(Paint.)
The manner in which the light strikes upon a picture; that part of a picture which represents those objects upon which the light is supposed to fall; the more illuminated part of a landscape or other scene; – opposed to
shade
. Cf.
Chiaroscuro
.
12.
Appearance due to the particular facts and circumstances presented to view; point of view;
as, to state things fairly and put them in the right
light
.
Frequent consideration of a thing . . . shows it in its several
lights
and various ways of appearance.
South.
13.
One who is conspicuous or noteworthy; a model or example;
as, the
lights
of the age or of antiquity
.
Joan of Arc,
A
light
of ancient France.
Tennyson.
14.
(Pyrotech.)
A firework made by filling a case with a substance which burns brilliantly with a white or colored flame;
as, a Bengal
light
.
Light is used figuratively to denote that which resembles physical light in any respect, as illuminating, benefiting, enlightening, or enlivening mankind.
Ancient lights
(Law)
,
Calcium light
,
Flash light
, etc.
See under
Ancient
,
Calcium
, etc.
Light ball
(Mil.)
,
a ball of combustible materials, used to afford light; – sometimes made so as to be fired from a cannon or mortar, or to be carried up by a rocket.
Light barrel
(Mil.)
,
an empty power barrel pierced with holes and filled with shavings soaked in pitch, used to light up a ditch or a breach.
Light dues
(Com.)
,
tolls levied on ships navigating certain waters, for the maintenance of lighthouses.
Light iron
,
a candlestick.
[Obs.]
Light keeper
,
a person appointed to take care of a lighthouse or light-ship.
Light money
,
charges laid by government on shipping entering a port, for the maintenance of lighthouses and light-ships.
The light of the countenance
,
favor; kindness; smiles.

Northern lights
.
See
Aurora borealis
, under
Aurora
.
To bring to light
,
to cause to be disclosed.
To come to light
,
to be disclosed.
To see the light
,
to come into the light; hence, to come into the world or into public notice;
as, his book never
saw the light
.
To stand in one's own light
,
to take a position which is injurious to one's own interest.

Light

(līt)
,
Adj.
[AS.
leíht
. See
Light
,
Noun.
]
[
Compar
.
Lighter
(līt′ẽr)
;
superl
.
Lightest
.]
1.
Having light; not dark or obscure; bright; clear;
as, the apartment is
light
.
2.
White or whitish; not intense or very marked; not of a deep shade; moderately colored;
as, a
light
color; a
light
brown; a
light
complexion.

Light

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Lighted
(līt′ĕd)
or
Lit
(lĭt)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Lighting
.]
[AS.
lȳhtan
,
līhtan
, to shine. √122. See
Light
,
Noun.
]
1.
To set fire to; to cause to burn; to set burning; to ignite; to kindle;
as, to
light
a candle or lamp; to
light
the gas
; – sometimes with
up
.
If a thousand candles be all
lighted
from one.
Hakewill.
And the largest lamp is
lit
.
Macaulay.
Absence might cure it, or a second mistress
Light
up another flame, and put out this.
Addison.
2.
To give light to; to illuminate; to fill with light; to spread over with light; – often with up.
Ah, hopeless, lasting flames! like those that burn
To
light
the dead.
Pope.
One hundred years ago, to have
lit
this theater as brilliantly as it is now
lighted
would have cost, I suppose, fifty pounds.
F. Harrison.
The sun has set, and Vesper, to supply
His absent beams, has
lighted
up the sky.
Dryden.
3.
To attend or conduct with a light; to show the way to by means of a light.
His bishops lead him forth, and
light
him on.
Landor.
To light a fire
,
to kindle the material of a fire.

Light

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To become ignited; to take fire;
as, the match will not
light
.
2.
To be illuminated; to receive light; to brighten; – with up;
as, the room
light
up very well
.

Light

,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Lighter
(līt′ẽr)
;
sup
erl.
Lightest
.]
[OE.
light
,
liht
, AS.
līht
,
leíht
; akin to D.
ligt
, G.
leicht
, OHG.
līhti
, Icel.
lēttr
, Dan.
let
, Sw.
lätt
, Goth.
leihts
, and perh. to L.
levis
(cf.
Levity
), Gr.
ἐλαχύσ
small, Skr.
laghu
light. √125.]
1.
Having little, or comparatively little, weight; not tending to be the center of gravity with force; not heavy.
These weights did not exert their natural gravity, . . . insomuch that I could not guess which was
light
or heavy whilst I held them in my hand.
Addison.
2.
Not burdensome; easy to be lifted, borne, or carried by physical strength;
as, a
light
burden, or load
.
Ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is
light
.
Matt. xi. 29, 30.
3.
Easy to be endured or performed; not severe; not difficult;
as, a
light
affliction or task
.
Chaucer.
Light
sufferings give us leisure to complain.
Dryden.
4.
Easy to be digested; not oppressive to the stomach;
as,
light
food
; also, containing little nutriment.
5.
Not heavily armed; armed with light weapons;
as,
light
troops; a troop of
light
horse.
6.
Not encumbered; unembarrassed; clear of impediments; hence, active; nimble; swift.
Unmarried men are best friends, best masters . . . but not always best subjects, for they are
light
to run away.
Bacon.
7.
Not heavily burdened; not deeply laden; not sufficiently ballasted;
as, the ship returned
light
.
8.
Slight; not important;
as, a
light
error
.
Shak.
9.
Well leavened; not heavy;
as,
light
bread
.
10.
Not copious or heavy; not dense; not inconsiderable;
as, a
light
rain; a
light
snow;
light
vapors.
11.
Not strong or violent; moderate;
as, a
light
wind
.
12.
Not pressing heavily or hard upon; hence, having an easy, graceful manner; delicate;
as, a
light
touch; a
light
style of execution.
13.
Easy to admit influence; inconsiderate; easily influenced by trifling considerations; unsteady; unsettled; volatile;
as, a
light
, vain person; a
light
mind.
There is no greater argument of a
light
and inconsiderate person than profanely to scoff at religion.
Tillotson.
14.
Indulging in, or inclined to, levity; wanting dignity or solemnity; trifling; gay; frivolous; airy; unsubstantial.
Seneca can not be too heavy, nor Plautus too
light
.
Shakespeare
Specimens of New England humor laboriously
light
and lamentably mirthful.
Hawthorne.
15.
Not quite sound or normal; somewhat impaired or deranged; dizzy; giddy.
Are his wits safe? Is he not
light
of brain ?
Shakespeare
16.
Easily bestowed; inconsiderately rendered.
To a fair semblance doth
light
faith annex.
Spenser.
17.
Wanton; unchaste;
as, a woman of
light
character
.
A
light
wife doth make a heavy husband.
Shakespeare
18.
Not of the legal, standard, or usual weight; clipped; diminished;
as,
light
coin
.
19.
Loose; sandy; easily pulverized;
as, a
light
soil
.
Light cavalry
,
Light horse
(Mil.)
,
light-armed soldiers mounted on strong and active horses.
Light eater
,
one who eats but little.
Light infantry
,
infantry soldiers selected and trained for rapid evolutions.
Light of foot
.
(a)
Having a light step.
(b)
Fleet.
Light of heart
,
gay, cheerful.
Light oil
(Chem.)
,
the oily product, lighter than water, forming the chief part of the first distillate of coal tar, and consisting largely of benzene and toluene.
Light sails
(Naut.)
,
all the sails above the topsails, with, also, the studding sails and flying jib.
Dana.
Light sleeper
,
one easily wakened.
Light weight
,
a prize fighter, boxer, wrestler, or jockey, who is below a standard medium weight. Cf.
Feather weight
, under
Feather
.
[Cant]
To make light of
,
to treat as of little consequence; to slight; to disregard.
To set light by
,
to undervalue; to slight; to treat as of no importance; to despise.

Light

(līt)
,
adv.
Lightly; cheaply.
Hooker.

Light

,
Verb.
T.
[See
Light
not heavy, and cf.
Light
to alight, and
Lighten
to make less heavy.]
To lighten; to ease of a burden; to take off.
[Obs.]
From his head the heavy burgonet did
light
.
Spenser.

Light

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Lighted
(līt′ĕd)
or
Lit
(lĭt)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Lighting
.]
[AS.
līhtan
to alight orig., to relieve (a horse) of the rider's burden, to make less heavy, fr.
līht
light. See
Light
not heavy, and cf.
Alight
,
Lighten
to make light.]
1.
To dismount; to descend, as from a horse or carriage; to alight; – with
from
,
off
,
on
,
upon
,
at
,
in
.
When she saw Isaac, she
lighted
off the camel.
Gen. xxiv. 64.
Slowly rode across a withered heath,
And
lighted
at a ruined inn.
Tennyson.
2.
To feel light; to be made happy.
[Obs.]
It made all their hearts to
light
.
Chaucer.
3.
To descend from flight, and rest, perch, or settle, as a bird or insect.
[The bee]
lights
on that, and this, and tasteth all.
Sir. J. Davies.
On the tree tops a crested peacock
lit
.
Tennyson.
4.
To come down suddenly and forcibly; to fall; – with
on
or
upon
.
On me, me only, as the source and spring
Of all corruption, all the blame
lights
due.
Milton.
5.
To come by chance; to happen; – with
on
or
upon
; formerly with
into
.
The several degrees of vision, which the assistance of glasses (casually at first
lit
on) has taught us to conceive.
Locke.
They shall
light
into atheistical company.
South.
And here we
lit
on Aunt Elizabeth,
And Lilia with the rest.
Tennyson.

Webster 1828 Edition


Light

LIGHT

,
Noun.
lite. [L. lux, light and luceo, to shine. Eng. luck, both in elements and radical sense.]
1.
That ethereal agent or matter which makes objects perceptible to the sense of seeing, but the particles of which are separately invisible. It is now generally believed that light is a fluid, or real matter, existing independent of other substances, with properties peculiar to itself. Its velocity is astonishing, as it passes through a space of nearly twelve millions of miles in a minute. Light, when decomposed, is found to consist of rays differently colored; as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. The sun is the principal source of light in the solar system; but light is also emitted from bodies ignited, or in combustion, and is reflected from enlightened bodies, as the moon. Light is also emitted from certain putrefying substances. It is usually united with heat, but it exists also independent of it.
2.
That flood of luminous rays which flows from the sun and constitutes day.
God called the light day, and the darkness he called night. Gen. 1.
3.
Day; the dawn of day.
The murderer rising with the light, killeth the poor and needy. Job. 24.
4.
Life.
O, spring to light, auspicious babe, be born!
5.
Any thing that gives light; as a lamp, candle, taper, lighted tower, star, &c.
Then he called for a light, and sprang in - Act. 16.
I have set thee to be a light to the Gentiles. Acts 13.
And God made two great lights. Gen. 1.
6.
The illuminated part of a picture; the part which lies open to the luminary by which the piece is supposed to be enlightened, and is painted in vivid colors; opposed to shade.
7.
Illumination of mind; instruction; knowledge.
I opened Ariosto in Italian, and the very first two lines gave me light to all I could desire.
Light, understanding and wisdom - was found in him. Dan. 5.
8.
Means of knowing. By using such lights as we have, we may arrive at probability, if not at certainty.
9.
Open view; a visible state; a state of being seen by the eye, or perceived, understood or known. Further researches will doubtless bring to light many isles yet undiscovered; further experiments will bring to light properties of matter yet unknown.
10.
Public view or notice.
Why am I ask'd what next shall see the light?
11.
Explanation; illustration; means of understanding. One part of Scripture throws light on another.
12.
Point of view; situation to be seen or viewed; a use of the word taken from painting. It is useful to exhibit a subject in a variety of lights. Let every thought be presented in a strong light. In whatever light we view this event, it must be considered an evil.
13.
A window; a place that admits light to enter.
1Kings 7.
14.
A pane of glass; as a window with twelve lights.
15.
In Scripture, God, the source of knowledge.
God is light. 1John 1.
16.
Christ.
That was the true light, that lighteth every man that cometh into the world. John 1.
17.
Joy; comfort; felicity.
Light is sown for the righteous. Ps. 97.
18.
Saving knowledge.
It is because there is no light in them. Is. 8.
19.
Prosperity; happiness.
Then shall thy light break forth as the morning. Is.58.
20.
Support; comfort; deliverance. Mic. 7.
21.
The gospel. Matt. 4.
22.
The understanding or judgment. Matt. 6.
23.
The gifts and graces of christians. Matt. 5.
24.
A moral instructor, as John the Baptist. John 5.
25.
A true christian, a person enlightened. Eph. 5.
26.
A good king, the guide of his people. Sam. 21.
The light of the countenance, favor; smiles. Ps. 4.
To stand in one's own light, to be the means of preventing good, or frustrating one's own purposes.
To come to light, to be detected; to be discovered or found.

LIGHT

,
Adj.
lite.
1.
Bright; clear; not dark or obscure; as, the morning is light; the apartment is light.
2.
In colors, white or whitish; as a light color; a light brown; a light complexion.

LIGHT

,
Adj.
lite.
1.
Having little weight; not tending to the center of gravity with force; not heavy. A feather is light, compared with lead or silver; but a thing is light only comparatively. That which is light to a man, may be heavy to a child. A light burden for a camel, may be insupportable to a horse.
2.
Not burdensome; easy to be lifted, borne or carried by physical strength; as a light burden, weight or load.
3.
Not oppressive; easy to be suffered or endured; as a light affliction. 2Cor. 4.
4.
Easy to be performed; not difficult; not requiring great strength or exertion. The task is light; the work is light.
5.
Easy to be digested; not oppressive to the stomach; as light food. It may signify also, contained little nutriment.
6.
Not heavily armed, or armed with light weapons; as light troops; a troop of light horse.
7.
Active; swift; nimble.
Asahel was as light of foot as a wild roe. Sam. 2.
8.
Not encumbered; unembarrassed; clear of impediments.
Unmarried men are best masters, but not best subjects; for they are light to run away.
9.
Not laden; not deeply laden; not sufficiently ballasted. The ship returned light.
10.
Slight; trifling; not important; as a light error.
11.
Not dense; not gross; as light vapors; light fumes.
12.
Small; inconsiderable; not copious or vehement; as a light rain; a light snow.
13.
Not strong; not violent; moderate; as a light wind.
14.
Easy to admit influence; inconsiderate; easily influenced by trifling considerations; unsteady; unsettled; volatile; as a light, vain person; a light mind.
There is no greater argument of a light and inconsiderate person, than profanely to scoff at religion.
15.
Gay; airy; indulging levity; wanting dignity or solidity; trifling.
Seneca cannot be too heavy, nor Plautus too light.
We may neither be light in prayer, now wrathful in debate.
16.
Wanton; unchaste; as a woman of light carriage.
A light wife doth make a heavy husband.
17.
Not of legal weight; clipped; diminished; as light coin.
To set light by, to undervalue; to slight; to treat as of no importance; to despise.
To make light of, to treat as of little consequence; to slight; to disregard.

LIGHT

,
Verb.
T.
lite.
1.
To kindle; to inflame; to set fire to; as, to light a candle or lamp; sometimes with up; as, to light up an inextinguishable flame. We often hear lit used for lighted as, he lit a candle; but this is inelegant.
2.
To give light to.
Ah hopeless, lasting flames! like those that burn to light the dead -
3.
To illuminate; to fill or spread over with light; as, to light a room; to light the streets of a city.
4.
To lighten; to ease of a burden. [Not in use. See Lighten.]

LIGHT

,
Verb.
I.
lite.
1.
To fall on; to come to by chance; to happen to find; with on.
A weaker man may sometimes light on notions which had escaped a wiser.
2.
To fall on; to strike.
They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat. Rev. 7.
3.
To descend, as from a horse or carriage; with down, off, or from.
He lighten down from his chariot. 2Kings 5.
She lighted off the camel. Gen. 24.
To settle; to rest; to stoop from flight. The bee lights on this flower and that.

Definition 2021


Light

Light

See also: light

English

Proper noun

Light

  1. A surname.
  2. A city located in Greene County county in Arkansas, United States.

References

light

light

See also: Light

English

Alternative forms

Noun

light (plural lights)

A city illuminated by colorful artificial lighting at night
  1. (uncountable) The natural medium emanating from the Sun and other very hot sources (now recognised as electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength of 400-750 nm), within which vision is possible.
    As you can see, this spacious dining-room gets a lot of light in the mornings.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps, [] , and the light of the reflector fell full upon her.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess:
      Here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the pictures, mostly of the English school, were mellow and gentle in the afternoon light.
    • 2013 July 20, Out of the gloom”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      [Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.
  2. A source of illumination.
    Put that light out!
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights, [], the height and vastness of this noble fane, its antiquity and its strength—all these things seemed to have their part as causes of the thrilling emotion that accompanied his thoughts.
  3. Spiritual or mental illumination; enlightenment, useful information.
    Can you throw any light on this problem?
    • Shakespeare
      He shall never know / That I had any light of this from thee.
  4. (in the plural, now rare) Facts; pieces of information; ideas, concepts.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, Book I, New York 2001, page 166:
      Now these notions are twofold, actions or habits [], which are durable lights and notions, which we may use when we will.
  5. A notable person within a specific field or discipline.
    Picasso was one of the leading lights of the cubist movement.
    • Tennyson
      Joan of Arc, a light of ancient France
  6. (painting) The manner in which the light strikes a picture; that part of a picture which represents those objects upon which the light is supposed to fall; the more illuminated part of a landscape or other scene; opposed to shade.
  7. A point of view, or aspect from which a concept, person or thing is regarded.
    I'm really seeing you in a different light today.
    Magoon's governorship in Cuba was viewed in a negative light by many Cuban historians for years thereafter.
    • South
      Frequent consideration of a thing [] shows it in its several lights and various ways of appearance.
    • Now if there was one thing that the animals were completely certain of, it was that they did not want Jones back. When it was put to them in this light, they had no more to say.
  8. A flame or something used to create fire.
    Hey, buddy, you got a light?
  9. A firework made by filling a case with a substance which burns brilliantly with a white or coloured flame.
    a Bengal light
  10. A window, or space for a window in architecture.
    This facade has eight south-facing lights.
  11. The series of squares reserved for the answer to a crossword clue.
    The average length of a light on a 15×15 grid is 7 or 8.
  12. (informal) A cross-light in a double acrostic or triple acrostic.
  13. Open view; a visible state or condition; public observation; publicity.
    • Shakespeare
      The duke yet would have dark deeds darkly answered; he would never bring them to light.
  14. The power of perception by vision.
    • Bible, Psalms xxxviii. 10
      My strength faileth me; as for the light of my eyes, it also is gone from me.
  15. The brightness of the eye or eyes.
    • Shakespeare
      He seemed to find his way without his eyes; / For out o'door he went without their helps, / And, to the last, bended their light on me.
  16. A traffic light, or, by extension, an intersection controlled by one.
    To get to our house, turn right at the third light.
Synonyms
  • (electromagnetic wave perceived by the eye): visible light
  • See also Wikisaurus:light source
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English lighten, lihten, from Old English līhtan, lȳhtan, lēohtan (to lighten, illuminate, give light, shine; grow light, dawn; light, kindle).

Verb

light (third-person singular simple present lights, present participle lighting, simple past and past participle lit or lighted)

  1. (transitive) To start (a fire).
    We lit the fire to get some heat.
  2. (transitive) To set fire to; to set burning; to kindle.
    She lit her last match.
    • Hakewill
      if a thousand candles be all lighted from one
    • Addison
      Absence might cure it, or a second mistress / Light up another flame, and put out this.
  3. (transitive) To illuminate.
    I used my torch to light the way home through the woods in the night.
    • F. Harrison
      One hundred years ago, to have lit this theatre as brilliantly as it is now lighted would have cost, I suppose, fifty pounds.
    • Dryden
      The Sun has set, and Vesper, to supply / His absent beams, has lighted up the sky.
  4. (intransitive) To become ignited; to take fire.
    This soggy match will not light.
  5. To attend or conduct with a light; to show the way to by means of a light.
    • Landor
      His bishops lead him forth, and light him on.
Synonyms
Antonyms
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Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English light, liht, leoht, from Old English lēoht (luminous, bright, light, clear, resplendent, renowned, beautiful), from Proto-Germanic *leuhtaz (light), from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light). Cognate with Saterland Frisian ljoacht (light), Dutch licht, German licht.

Adjective

light (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Having light.
    The room is light when the Sun shines through the window.
  2. Pale in colour.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the Sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
    She had light skin.
  3. (of coffee) Served with extra milk or cream.
    I like my coffee light.
Synonyms
Derived terms
  • light-haired
  • light-skinned
Translations

Etymology 4

From Old English lēoht, from Proto-Germanic *linhtaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʷʰ- (light). Cognate with Dutch licht, German leicht, Swedish lätt, Norwegian lett, Albanian lehtë, Latin levis, Lithuanian lengvas, Sanskrit लघु (laghu).

Adjective

light (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Of low weight; not heavy.
    My bag was much lighter once I had dropped off the books.
    • Addison
      These weights did not exert their natural gravity [] insomuch that I could not guess which was light or heavy whilst I held them in my hand.
  2. Lightly-built; designed for speed or small loads.
    We took a light aircraft down to the city.
  3. Gentle; having little force or momentum.
    This artist clearly had a light, flowing touch.
  4. Easy to endure or perform.
    light duties around the house
    • Dryden
      Light sufferings give us leisure to complain.
  5. Low in fat, calories, alcohol, salt, etc.
    This light beer still gets you drunk if you have enough of it.
  6. Unimportant, trivial, having little value or significance.
    I made some light comment, and we moved on.
  7. (rail transport, of a locomotive, usually with "run") travelling with no carriages, wagons attached
  8. (obsolete) Unchaste, wanton.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.i:
      Long after lay he musing at her mood, / Much grieu'd to thinke that gentle Dame so light, / For whose defence he was to shed his blood.
    • Shakespeare
      So do not you; for you are a light girl.
    • Shakespeare
      A light wife doth make a heavy husband.
  9. Not heavily armed; armed with light weapons.
    light troops; a troop of light horse
  10. Not encumbered; unembarrassed; clear of impediments; hence, active; nimble; swift.
    • Francis Bacon
      Unmarried men are best friends, best masters [] but not always best subjects, for they are light to run away.
  11. (dated) Easily influenced by trifling considerations; unsteady; unsettled; volatile.
    a light, vain person; a light mind
    • Tillotson
      There is no greater argument of a light and inconsiderate person than profanely to scoff at religion.
  12. Indulging in, or inclined to, levity; lacking dignity or solemnity; frivolous; airy.
    Ogden Nash was a writer of light verse.
    • Shakespeare
      Seneca can not be too heavy, nor Plautus too light.
    • Hawthorne
      specimens of New England humour laboriously light and lamentably mirthful
  13. Not quite sound or normal; somewhat impaired or deranged; dizzy; giddy.
    • Shakespeare
      Are his wits safe? Is he not light of brain?
  14. Not of the legal, standard, or usual weight; clipped; diminished.
    light coin
  15. Easily interrupted by stimulation.
    light sleep; light anesthesia
Synonyms
Antonyms
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Translations

Adverb

light (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Carrying little.
    I prefer to travel light.

Translations

Noun

light (plural lights)

  1. (curling) A stone that is not thrown hard enough.

Verb

light (third-person singular simple present lights, present participle lighting, simple past and past participle lighted)

  1. (nautical) To unload a ship, or to jettison material to make it lighter
  2. To lighten; to ease of a burden; to take off.
    • Spenser
      His mailèd habergeon she did undight, / And from his head his heavy burgonet did light.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 5

Old English līhtan

Verb

light (third-person singular simple present lights, present participle lighting, simple past and past participle lit or lighted)

  1. To find by chance.
    I lit upon a rare book in a second-hand bookseller's.
  2. (archaic) To alight; to land or come down.
    She fell out of the window but luckily lit on her feet.
    • Theodore Roosevelt, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman
      Some kinds of ducks in lighting strike the water with their tails first, and skitter along the surface for a few feet before settling down.
Synonyms
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Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: Gutenberg · best · word · #247: light · felt · since · use

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowing from English light.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈlajt͡ʃ/

Adjective

light (invariable, comparable)

  1. (of food) light (low in fat, calories, alcohol, salt or other undesirable substances)

Synonyms


Spanish

Etymology

From English light.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /la̠it/

Adjective

light m, f (plural light)

  1. light (low in fat, calories, salt, alcohol, etc.)
  2. (of cigarettes) light (low in tar, nicotine and other noxious chemicals)
  3. (by extension) Lacking substance or seriousness; lite.

Usage notes

  • As a foreign term with unassimilated spelling and pronunciation, light is usually rendered in italics in formal contexts or published writings.

References