Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Fold

Fold

(fōld)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Folded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Folding
.]
[OE.
folden
,
falden
, AS.
fealdan
; akin to OHG.
faltan
,
faldan
, G.
falten
, Icel.
falda
, Dan.
folde
, Sw.
fålla
, Goth.
falþan
, cf. Gr.
δι-πλάσιοσ
twofold, Skr.
puṭa
a fold. Cf.
Fauteuil
.]
1.
To lap or lay in plaits or folds; to lay one part over another part of; to double;
as, to
fold
cloth; to
fold
a letter.
As a vesture shalt thou
fold
them up.
Heb. i. 12.
2.
To double or lay together, as the arms or the hands;
as, he
folds
his arms in despair
.
3.
To inclose within folds or plaitings; to envelop; to infold; to clasp; to embrace.
A face
folded in sorrow
.
J. Webster.
We will descend and
fold
him in our arms.
Shakespeare
4.
To cover or wrap up; to conceal.
Nor
fold
my fault in cleanly coined excuses.
Shakespeare

Fold

,
Verb.
I.
To become folded, plaited, or doubled; to close over another of the same kind; to double together;
as, the leaves of the door
fold
.
1 Kings vi. 34.

Fold

,
Noun.
[From
Fold
,
Verb.
In sense 2 AS.
-feald
, akin to
fealdan
to fold.]
1.
A doubling,esp. of any flexible substance; a part laid over on another part; a plait; a plication.
Mummies . . . shrouded in a number of
folds
of linen.
Bacon.
Folds
are most common in the rocks of mountainous regions.
J. D. Dana.
2.
Times or repetitions; – used with numerals, chiefly in composition, to denote multiplication or increase in a geometrical ratio, the doubling, tripling, etc., of anything;
as, four
fold
, four times, increased in a quadruple ratio, multiplied by four
.
3.
That which is folded together, or which infolds or envelops; embrace.
Shall from your neck unloose his amorous
fold
.
Shakespeare
Fold net
,
a kind of net used in catching birds.

Fold

,
Noun.
[OE.
fald
,
fold
, AS.
fald
,
falod
.]
1.
An inclosure for sheep; a sheep pen.
Leaps o’er the fence with ease into the
fold
.
Milton.
2.
A flock of sheep; figuratively, the Church or a church;
as, Christ's
fold
.
There shall be one
fold
and one shepherd.
John x. 16.
The very whitest lamb in all my
fold
.
Tennyson.
3.
A boundary; a limit.
[Obs.]
Creech.
Fold yard
,
an inclosure for sheep or cattle.

Fold

,
Verb.
T.
To confine in a fold, as sheep.

Fold

,
Verb.
I.
To confine sheep in a fold.
[R.]
The star that bids the shepherd
fold
.
Milton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Fold

FOLD

,
Noun.
[See the verb, to fold.]
1.
A pen or inclosure for sheep; a place where a flock of sheep is kept, whether in the field or under shelter.
2.
A flock of sheep. Hence in a scriptural sense, the church, the flock of the Shepherd of Israel.
Other sheep I have, which are not of this fold. John 10.
3.
A limit. [Not in use.]

FOLD

, n.
1.
The doubling of any flexible substance, as cloth; complication; a plait; one part turned or bent and laid on another; as a fold of linen.
2.
In composition, the same quantity added; as two fold, four fold, ten fold, that is, twice as much, four times as much, ten times as much.

FOLD

,
Verb.
T.
[Heb. The primary sense is to fall, or to lay, to set, throw or press together.]
1.
To double; to lap or lay in plaits; as, to fold a piece of cloth.
2.
To double and insert one part in another; as, to fold a letter.
3.
To double or lay together, as the arms. He folds his arms in despair.
4.
To confine sheep in a fold.

FOLD

,
Verb.
I.
To close over another of the same kind; as, the leaves of the door fold.

Definition 2022


fold

fold

See also: -fold, föld, and Föld

English

Verb

fold (third-person singular simple present folds, present participle folding, simple past folded or (obsolete) feld, past participle folded or (rare) folden)

  1. (transitive) To bend (any thin material, such as paper) over so that it comes in contact with itself.
  2. (transitive) To make the proper arrangement (in a thin material) by bending.
    If you fold the sheets, they'll fit more easily in the drawer.
  3. (intransitive) To become folded; to form folds.
    Cardboard doesn't fold very easily.
  4. (intransitive, informal) To fall over; to be crushed.
    The chair folded under his enormous weight.
  5. (transitive) To enclose within folded arms (see also enfold).
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula Chapter 21
      He put out his arms and folded her to his breast. And for a while she lay there sobbing. He looked at us over her bowed head, with eyes that blinked damply above his quivering nostrils. His mouth was set as steel.
  6. (intransitive) To give way on a point or in an argument.
  7. (intransitive, poker) To withdraw from betting.
    With no hearts in the river and no chance to hit his straight, he folded.
  8. (intransitive, by extension) To withdraw or quit in general.
  9. (transitive, cooking) To stir gently, with a folding action.
    Fold the egg whites into the batter.
  10. (intransitive, business) Of a company, to cease to trade.
    The company folded after six quarters of negative growth.
  11. To double or lay together, as the arms or the hands.
    He folded his arms in defiance.
  12. To cover or wrap up; to conceal.
    • Shakespeare
      Nor fold my fault in cleanly coined excuses.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

fold (plural folds)

  1. An act of folding.
  2. A bend or crease.
    • Francis Bacon
      mummies [] shrouded in a number of folds of linen
    • J. D. Dana
      Folds are most common in the rocks of mountainous regions.
  3. Any correct move in origami.
  4. (newspapers) The division between the top and bottom halves of a broadsheet: headlines above the fold will be readable in a newsstand display; usually the fold.
  5. (by extension, web design) The division between the part of a web page visible in a web browser window without scrolling; usually the fold.
  6. That which is folded together, or which enfolds or envelops; embrace.
    • Shakespeare
      Shall from your neck unloose his amorous fold.
  7. A group of sheep or goats.
  8. A group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church.
  9. A group of people with shared ideas or goals or who live or work together.
    • 2013, Phil McNulty, "", BBC Sport, 1 September 2013:
      Having suffered the loss of Rooney just as he had returned to the fold, Moyes' mood will not have improved as Liverpool took the lead in the third minute.
  10. (geology) The bending or curving of one or a stack of originally flat and planar surfaces, such as sedimentary strata, as a result of plastic (i.e. permanent) deformation.
  11. (computing, programming) In functional programming, any of a family of higher-order functions that process a data structure recursively to build up a value.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English fold, fald, from Old English fald, falæd, falod (fold, stall, stable, cattle-pen), from Proto-Germanic *faludaz (enclosure). Akin to Scots fald, fauld (an enclosure for livestock), Dutch vaalt (dung heap), Middle Low German valt, vālt (an inclosed space, a yard), Danish fold (pen for herbivorous livestock), Swedish fålla (corral, pen, pound).

Noun

fold (plural folds)

  1. A pen or enclosure for sheep or other domestic animals.
    • Milton
      Leaps o'er the fence with ease into the fold.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, in Lord Stranleigh Abroad:
      “I came down like a wolf on the fold, didn’t I ?  Why didn’t I telephone ?  Strategy, my dear boy, strategy. This is a surprise attack, and I’d no wish that the garrison, forewarned, should escape. …”
  2. (figuratively) Home, family.
  3. (religion, Christian) A church congregation, a church, the Christian church as a whole, the flock of Christ.
    John, X, 16: "Other sheep I have which are not of this fold."
  4. (obsolete) A boundary or limit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Creech to this entry?)
Synonyms
Translations

Verb

fold (third-person singular simple present folds, present participle folding, simple past and past participle folded)

  1. To confine sheep in a fold.
    The star that bids the shepherd fold Milton.

Etymology 3

From Middle English, from Old English folde (earth, land, country, district, region, territory, ground, soil, clay), from Proto-Germanic *fuldǭ (ground, plain), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (field, plain). Cognate with Norwegian and Icelandic fold (land, earth, meadow).

Noun

fold (uncountable)

  1. (dialectal, poetic or obsolete) The Earth; earth; land, country.

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔl/, [fʌlˀ]

Etymology 1

from Old Norse faldr (seam).

Noun

fold c (singular definite folden, plural indefinite folder)

  1. fold
  2. crease
  3. wrinkle
Inflection

Etymology 2

Noun

fold c (singular definite folden, plural indefinite folde)

  1. fold, pen
Inflection

Etymology 3

Noun

fold n

  1. multiple

Etymology 4

See folde (to fold).

Verb

fold

  1. imperative of folde

See also


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse fold.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fɔlt]
  • Rhymes: -ɔlt

Noun

fold f (genitive singular foldar, nominative plural foldir)

  1. (poetic) earth, ground, land

Old Norse

Etymology

From a common Germanic root; probably from the same Proto-Indo-European root as the English words "field" and "fold" (as in "pen for animals", "of the fold").

Noun

fold f

  1. (poetic) earth, land; field
    • The Alvíssmál, verses 9 and 10:
      Hvé sú jǫrð heitir, / er liggr fyr alda sonum / heimi hverjum í?
      [] Jǫrð heitir með mǫnnum, / en með Ásum fold, / kalla vega Vanir.
      How is the earth named, / that which lies before the sons of men, / in each of the worlds?
      {{..}} "Earth" it is named among men, / but among the Æsir "Field", / the Vanir call it "Ways".

References

  • fold in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press