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Webster 1913 Edition


Error

Er′ror

,
Noun.
[OF.
error
,
errur
, F.
erreur
, L.
error
, fr.
errare
to err. See
Err
.]
1.
A wandering; a roving or irregular course.
[Obs.]
The rest of his journey, his
error
by sea.
B. Jonson.
2.
A wandering or deviation from the right course or standard; irregularity; mistake; inaccuracy; something made wrong or left wrong;
as, an
error
in writing or in printing; a clerical
error
.
3.
A departing or deviation from the truth; falsity; false notion; wrong opinion; mistake; misapprehension.
His judgment was often in
error
, though his candor remained unimpaired.
Bancroft.
4.
A moral offense; violation of duty; a sin or transgression; iniquity; fault.
Ps. xix. 12.
5.
(Math.)
The difference between the approximate result and the true result; – used particularly in the rule of double position.
6.
(Mensuration)
(a)
The difference between an observed value and the true value of a quantity.
(b)
The difference between the observed value of a quantity and that which is taken or computed to be the true value; – sometimes called
residual error
.
7.
(Law.)
A mistake in the proceedings of a court of record in matters of law or of fact.
8.
(Baseball)
A fault of a player of the side in the field which results in failure to put out a player on the other side, or gives him an unearned base.
Syn. – Mistake; fault; blunder; failure; fallacy; delusion; hallucination; sin. See
Blunder
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Error

ER'ROR

,
Noun.
[L. error, from erro, to wander.] A wandering or deviation from the truth; a mistake in judgment, by which men assent to or believe what is not true. Error may be voluntary, or involuntary. Voluntary, when men neglect or pervert the proper means to inform the mind; involuntary, when the means of judging correctly are not in their power. An error committed through carelessness or haste is a blunder.
Charge home upon error its most tremendous consequences.
1.
A mistake made in writing or other performance. It is no easy task to correct the errors of the press. Authors sometimes charge their own errors to the printer.
2.
A wandering; excursion; irregular course.
Driv'n by the winds and errors of the sea.
[This sense is unusual and hardly legitimate.]
3.
Deviation from law, justice or right; oversight; mistake in conduct.
Say not, it was an error. Eccles.5.
4.
In scripture and theology, sin; iniquity; transgression.
Who can understand his errors? Cleanse thou me from secret faults. Ps.19.

Definition 2023


error

error

English

Alternative forms

Noun

error (countable and uncountable, plural errors)

  1. (uncountable) The state, quality, or condition of being wrong.
    • 1913, The Inland printer:
      "Am I in error in marking out the s in the word assistants used in the following manner? [...]"
  2. (countable) A mistake; an accidental wrong action or a false statement not made deliberately.
    • 2011 October 22, Sam Sheringham, “Aston Villa 1 - 2 West Brom”, in BBC Sport:
      Chris Brunt sliced the spot-kick well wide but his error was soon forgotten as Olsson headed home from a corner.
  3. (computing, countable) A failure to complete a task, usually involving a premature termination.
  4. (statistics, countable) The difference between a measured or calculated value and a true one.
  5. (baseball, countable) A play which is scored as having been made incorrectly.
  6. (appellate law, uncountable) One or more mistakes in a trial that could be grounds for review of the judgement.
  7. Any alteration in the DNA chemical structure occurring during DNA replication, recombination or repairing.

Synonyms

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

Verb

error (third-person singular simple present errors, present participle erroring, simple past and past participle errored)

  1. (computing) To function improperly due to an error, especially accompanied by error message.
    The web-page took a long time to load and errored out.
    Remove that line of code and the script should stop erroring there.
    This directory errors with a "Permission denied" message.
  2. (telecommunications) To show or contain an error or fault.
    The block transmission errored near the start and could not be received.
  3. (nonstandard) To err.
    • 1993 December, Arie Kaufman (editor), Rendering, Visualization, and Rasterization Hardware, Springer-Verlag New York LLC
      Pixels which are mathematically outside of a triangle, but which are included for anti-aliasing purposes can be generated with colour and depth information outside of the valid range. The ADE should identify these cases and clamp the output to the minimum or maximum value depending on the direction it has errored in.
    • 2000 December, Randy W. Kamphaus, Clinical Assessment of Child And Adolescent Intelligence, Allyn & Bacon
      By doing so examiners are erroring in the direction of drawing hypotheses based on greater evidence of reliability and validity.
    • 2001 November, Daniel D. Dancer, Shards and Circles: Artistic Adventures in Spirit and Ecology, Trafford Publishing
      Error is not just permitted by diversity; it is what permits diversity.... The beetle had “errored” beautifully
    • 2002 May, Sylvain Beauregard, Passion Celine Dion the Book: The Ultimate Guide for the Fan!, Trafford Publishing
      Many other celebrities errored in the political comments area...

Synonyms

Derived terms

  • error out

Translations

See also


Asturian

Etymology

From Latin error.

Noun

error m (plural errores)

  1. error

Catalan

Noun

error m (plural errors)

  1. error

Galician

Noun

error m (plural errores)

  1. Alternative form of erro

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈer.ror/, [ˈɛr.rɔr]

Noun

error m (genitive errōris); third declension

  1. wandering
  2. wavering, uncertainty
  3. error, mistake, delusion
  4. solecism

Inflection

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative error errōrēs
genitive errōris errōrum
dative errōrī errōribus
accusative errōrem errōrēs
ablative errōre errōribus
vocative error errōrēs

Verb

error

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of errō

Descendants

References

  • error in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • error in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ERROR in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), “error”, in Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book, London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the wanderings of Ulysses: errores Ulixis
    • to be mistaken: in errore versari
    • to be in gross error, seriously misled: magno errore teneri
    • to be in gross error, seriously misled: in magno errore versari
    • to fall into error: erroribus implicari (Tusc. 4. 27. 58)
    • to take a false step: per errorem labi, or simply labi
    • to lead a person into error: aliquem in errorem inducere, rapere
    • to get a mistaken notion into the mind: errorem animo imbibere
    • to imbibe error from one's mother's breasts: errorem cum lacte nutricis sugere (Tusc. 3. 1. 2)
    • to banish an error, do away with a false impression: errorem tollere
    • to banish an error, do away with a false impression: errorem amputare et circumcīdere
    • to totally eradicate false principles: errorem stirpitus extrahere
    • to amend, correct one's mistake: errorem deponere, corrigere
    • to undeceive a person: alicui errorem demere, eripere, extorquere
    • (ambiguous) erroneous opinion: opinionis error
    • (ambiguous) a wide-spread error: error longe lateque diffusus

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin error.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [eˈroɾ]

Noun

error m (plural errores)

  1. error

Synonyms

Related terms