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Webster 1913 Edition


Wed

Wed

(wĕd)
,
Noun.
[AS.
wedd
; akin to OFries.
wed
, OD.
wedde
, OHG,
wetti
, G.
wette
a wager, Icel.
veð
a pledge, Sw.
vad
a wager, an appeal, Goth.
wadi
a pledge, Lith.
vadůti
to redeem (a pledge), LL.
vadium
, L.
vas
,
vadis
, bail, security,
vadimonium
security, and Gr. [GREEK], [GREEK] a prize. Cf.
Athlete
,
Gage
a pledge,
Wage
.]
A pledge; a pawn.
[Obs.]
Gower. Piers Plowman.
Let him be ware, his neck lieth to
wed
[i. e., for a security].
Chaucer.

Wed

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp.
Wedded
;
p. p.
Wedded
or
Wed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Wedding
.]
[OE.
wedden
, AS.
weddian
to covenant, promise, to wed, marry; akin to OFries.
weddia
to promise, D.
wedden
to wager, to bet, G.
wetten
, Icel.
veðja
, Dan.
vedde
, Sw.
vädja
to appeal, Goth. ga
wadjōn
to betroth. See
Wed
,
Noun.
]
1.
To take for husband or for wife by a formal ceremony; to marry; to espouse.
With this ring I thee
wed
.
Bk. of Com. Prayer.
I saw thee first, and
wedded
thee.
Milton.
2.
To join in marriage; to give in wedlock.
And Adam,
wedded
to another Eve,
Shall live with her.
Milton.
3.
Fig.: To unite as if by the affections or the bond of marriage; to attach firmly or indissolubly.
Thou art
wedded
to calamity.
Shakespeare
Men are
wedded
to their lusts.
Tillotson.
[Flowers] are
wedded
thus, like beauty to old age.
Cowper.
4.
To take to one’s self and support; to espouse.
[Obs.]
They positively and concernedly
wedded
his cause.
Clarendon.

Wed

,
Verb.
I.
To contact matrimony; to marry.
“When I shall wed.”
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Wed

WED

,
Verb.
T.
[L., to give bail; a league; probably both are of one family.]
1.
To marry; to take for a husband or for wife.
--Since the day I saw thee first, and wedded thee.
2.
To join in marriage.
And Adam, wedded to another Eve, shall live with her--
3.
To unite closely in affection; to attach firmly. WE are apt to be wedded to our own customs and opinions.
Men are wedded to their lusts.
4.
To unite for ever.
Thou art wedded to calamity.
5.
To espouse; to take part with.
They wedded his cause.

WED

,
Verb.
I.
To marry; to contract matrimony.
When shall I wed?

WED

,
Noun.
A pledge.

Definition 2023


Wed

Wed

See also: wed, wed., we'd, and Wed.

English

Noun

Wed

  1. Alternative spelling of Wed.

Translations

Anagrams

wed

wed

See also: Wed, wed., we'd, and Wed.

English

Verb

wed (third-person singular simple present weds, present participle wedding, simple past and past participle wed or wedded)

  1. (transitive) To perform the marriage ceremony for; to join in matrimony.
    The priest wed the couple.
    • Milton
      And Adam, wedded to another Eve, / Shall live with her.
  2. (transitive) To take as one's spouse.
    She wed her first love.
  3. (intransitive) To take a spouse.
  4. (figuratively, transitive) To join (more or less permanently)
    • Shakespeare
      Thou art wedded to calamity.
    • Tillotson
      Men are wedded to their lusts.
    • 2008, Bradley Simpson, Economists with Guns, page 72:
      [] the PPS paper proposed a political doctrine that wedded modernization theory to U.S. support for national security states []
  5. (figuratively, intransitive) To take to oneself and support; to espouse.
    • Clarendon
      They positively and concernedly wedded his cause.
  6. (obsolete, rare) To commit.
  7. (Northern England, Scotland) To wager, stake, bet, place a bet, make a wager.
    I'd wed my head on that.

References

Synonyms

Translations

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

Verb

wed

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wedden
  2. imperative of wedden

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch wedde, from Old Dutch *weddi, from Proto-Germanic *wadją.

Noun

wed n (plural wedden, diminutive wedje n)

  1. ford, shallow river crossing
  2. drinking place for animals
Synonyms
Related terms