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Webster 1913 Edition


Row

Row

,
Adj.
&
adv.
[See
Rough
.]
Rough; stern; angry.
[Obs.]
“Lock he never so row.”
Chaucer.

Row

,
Noun.
[Abbrev. fr.
rouse
, n.]
A noisy, turbulent quarrel or disturbance; a brawl.
[Colloq.]
Byron.

Row

,
Noun.
[OE.
rowe
,
rawe
,
rewe
, AS.
rāw
,
r[GREEK]w
; probably akin to D.
rij
, G.
reihe
; cf. Skr.
r[GREEK]khā
a line, stroke.]
A series of persons or things arranged in a continued line; a line; a rank; a file;
as, a
row
of trees; a
row
of houses or columns
.
And there were windows in three
rows
.
1 Kings vii. 4.
The bright seraphim in burning
row
.
Milton.
Row culture
(Agric.)
,
the practice of cultivating crops in drills.
Row of points
(Geom.)
,
the points on a line, infinite in number, as the points in which a pencil of rays is intersected by a line.

Row

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Rowed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Rowing
.]
[AS.
r[GREEK]wan
; akin to D.
roeijen
, MHG.
rüejen
, Dan.
roe
, Sw.
ro
, Icel.
r[GREEK]a
, L.
remus
oar, Gr. [GREEK], Skr.
aritra
. √8. Cf.
Rudder
.]
1.
To propel with oars, as a boat or vessel, along the surface of water;
as, to
row
a boat
.
2.
To transport in a boat propelled with oars;
as, to
row
the captain ashore in his barge
.

Row

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To use the oar;
as, to
row
well
.
2.
To be moved by oars;
as, the boat
rows
easily
.

Row

,
Noun.
The act of rowing; excursion in a rowboat.

Webster 1828 Edition


Row

ROW

, n.
A series of persons or things arranged in a continued line; a line; a rank; a file; as a row of trees; a row of gems or pearls; a row of houses or columns.
Where the bright Seraphim in burning row.

ROW

,
Verb.
T.
[Gr. to row, an oar. If the noun is the primary word, ruder and rother, an oar, may be from the root of rod, L. radius, or from the root of rado, to rub, grate, sweep. If the verb is the primary word, the sense is to sweep, to urge, drive, impel. See Rudder.]
1.
To impel, as a boat or vessel along the surface of water by oars; as, to row a boat.
2.
To transport by rowing; as, to row the captain ashore in his barge.

ROW

,
Verb.
I.
To labor with the oar; as, to row well; to row with oars muffled.

Definition 2022


row

row

See also: rów

English

Alternative forms

  • rew (dialectal)

Pronunciation

Noun

row (plural rows)

  1. A line of objects, often regularly spaced, such as seats in a theatre, vegetable plants in a garden etc.
    • Bible, 1 Kings vii. 4
      And there were windows in three rows.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      The bright seraphim in burning row.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.
  2. A line of entries in a table, etc., going from left to right, as opposed to a column going from top to bottom.
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English rowen (to row), from Old English rōwan (to row), from Proto-Germanic *rōaną (to row), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁reh₁- (to row). Compare West Frisian roeie, Dutch roeien, Danish ro. More at rudder.

Pronunciation

Noun

row (plural rows)

  1. (weightlifting) An exercise performed with a pulling motion of the arms towards the back.
Translations

Verb

row (third-person singular simple present rows, present participle rowing, simple past and past participle rowed)

  1. (transitive or intransitive, nautical) To propel (a boat or other craft) over water using oars.
  2. (transitive) To transport in a boat propelled with oars.
    to row the captain ashore in his barge
  3. (intransitive) To be moved by oars.
    The boat rows easily.
Translations

Etymology 3

Unclear; some suggest it is a back-formation from rouse, verb.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rou, IPA(key): /raʊ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ

Noun

row (plural rows)

  1. A noisy argument.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Byron to this entry?)
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      In the autumn there was a row at some cement works about the unskilled labour men. A union had just been started for them and all but a few joined. One of these blacklegs was laid for by a picket and knocked out of time.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 18, in The China Governess:
      ‘Then the father has a great fight with his terrible conscience,’ said Munday with granite seriousness. ‘Should he make a row with the police […]? Or should he say nothing about it and condone brutality for fear of appearing in the newspapers?
  2. A continual loud noise.
    Who's making that row?
Synonyms
Translations

Verb

row (third-person singular simple present rows, present participle rowing, simple past and past participle rowed)

  1. (intransitive) to argue noisily
Synonyms
Translations

Anagrams


Lower Sorbian

row

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *rovъ. Cognate with Upper Sorbian row, Polish rów (ditch), Czech rov, Russian ров (rov, ditch), Old Church Slavonic ровъ (rovŭ, ditch).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [row]

Noun

row m (diminutive rowk)

  1. grave

Declension


Manx

Etymology

From an old perfective particle ro- + va.

Verb

row

  1. was, were (dependent form)

Usage notes

Part of the substantive verb bee. This is the dependent form of the past tense va used after negative and interrogative particles:

    • Cha row aggle erbee er.
      • He was not in the least afraid.
    • Dooyrt eh dy row eh mac y ree.
      • He claimed that he was the son of the king.

Upper Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *rovъ.

Noun

row m

  1. grave

Vilamovian

row (1)
row (2)

Pronunciation

Noun

rōw f (plural rowa)

  1. rook (bird)
  2. raven