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Webster 1913 Edition


Mass

Mass

(mȧs)
,
Noun.
[OE.
masse
,
messe
, AS.
maesse
. LL.
missa
, from L.
mittere
,
missum
, to send, dismiss: cf. F.
messe
. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called
missa catechumenorum
, ending with the reading of the Gospel. Then they were
dismissed
with these words : “Ite, missa est” [sc. ecclesia], the congregation is dismissed. After that the sacrifice proper began. At its close the same words were said to those who remained. So the word gave the name of Mass to the sacrifice in the Catholic Church. See
Missile
, and cf.
Christmas
,
Lammas
,
Mess
a dish,
Missal
.]
1.
(R. C. Ch.)
The sacrifice in the sacrament of the Eucharist, or the consecration and oblation of the host.
2.
(Mus.)
The portions of the Mass usually set to music, considered as a musical composition; – namely, the
Kyrie
, the
Gloria
, the
Credo
, the
Sanctus
, and the
Agnus Dei
, besides sometimes an
Offertory
and the
Benedictus
.
Canon of the Mass
.
See
Canon
.
High Mass
,
Mass with incense, music, the assistance of a deacon, subdeacon, etc.
Low Mass
,
Mass which is said by the priest throughout, without music.
Mass bell
,
the sanctus bell. See
Sanctus
.
Mass book
,
the missal or Roman Catholic service book.

Mass

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Massed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Massing
.]
To celebrate Mass.
[Obs.]
Hooker.

Mass

,
Noun.
[OE.
masse
, F.
masse
, L.
massa
; akin to Gr. [GREEK] a barley cake, fr. [GREEK] to knead. Cf.
Macerate
.]
1.
A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size;
as, a
mass
of ore, metal, sand, or water
.
If it were not for these principles, the bodies of the earth, planets, comets, sun, and all things in them, would grow cold and freeze, and become inactive
masses
.
Sir I. Newton.
A deep
mass
of continual sea is slower stirred
To rage.
Savile.
2.
(Phar.)
A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills;
as, blue
mass
.
3.
A large quantity; a sum.
All the
mass
of gold that comes into Spain.
Sir W. Raleigh.
He had spent a huge
mass
of treasure.
Sir J. Davies.
4.
Bulk; magnitude; body; size.
This army of such
mass
and charge.
Shakespeare
5.
The principal part; the main body.
Night closed upon the pursuit, and aided the
mass
of the fugitives in their escape.
Jowett (Thucyd.).
6.
(Physics)
The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume.
Mass and weight are often used, in a general way, as interchangeable terms, since the weight of a body is proportional to its mass (under the same or equal gravitative forces), and the mass is usually ascertained from the weight. Yet the two ideas, mass and weight, are quite distinct. Mass is the quantity of matter in a body; weight is the comparative force with which it tends towards the center of the earth. A mass of sugar and a mass of lead are assumed to be equal when they show an equal weight by balancing each other in the scales.
Blue mass
.
See under
Blue
.
Mass center
(Geom.)
,
the center of gravity of a triangle.
Mass copper
,
native copper in a large mass.
Mass meeting
,
a large or general assembly of people, usually a meeting having some relation to politics.
The masses
,
the great body of the people, as contrasted with the higher classes; the populace.

Mass

,
Verb.
T.
To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble.
But
mass
them together and they are terrible indeed.
Coleridge.
2.
Murder.
[Obs.]
Shak.
Syn.
Massacre
,
Butchery
,
Carnage
.
Massacre denotes the promiscuous slaughter of many who can not make resistance, or much resistance. Butchery refers to cold-blooded cruelty in the killing of men as if they were brute beasts. Carnage points to slaughter as producing the heaped-up bodies of the slain.
I’ll find a day to
massacre
them all,
And raze their faction and their family.
Shakespeare
If thou delight to view thy heinous deeds,
Brhold this pattern of thy
butcheries
.
Shakespeare
Such a scent I draw
Of
carnage
, prey innumerable!
Milton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Mass

M`ASS

,
Noun.
[L. massa, a mass; Gr. to beat or pound.]
1.
A lump; a body of matter concreted, collected or formed into a lump; applied to any solid body; as a mass of iron or lead; a mass of flesh; as mass of ice; a mass of dough.
2.
A collective body of fluid matter. The ocean is a mass of water.
3.
A heap; as a mass of earth.
4.
A great quantity collected; as a mass of treasure.
5.
Bulk; magnitude.
This army of such mass and charge.
6.
An assemblage; a collection of particulars blended, confused or indistinct; as a mass of colors.
They lose their forms, and make a mass
Confused and black, if brought too near.
7.
Gross body of things considered collectively; the body; the bulk; as the mass of people in a nation. A small portion of morbid matter may infect the whole mass of fluids in the body.

M`ASS

,
Noun.
[Low L. missa. The word signifies primarily leisure, cessation from labor, from the L. missus, remissus, like the L. ferioe; hence a feast or holiday.] The service of the Romish church; the office or prayers used at the celebration of the eucharist; the consecration of the bread and wine.

M`ASS

,
Verb.
I.
To celebrate mass. [Not used.]

M`ASS

,
Verb.
T.
To fill; to stuff; to strengthen. [Not used.]

Definition 2021


Mass

Mass

See also: mass, maß, Maß, Mass., and måss

English

Noun

Mass (plural Masses)

  1. (Roman Catholic Church) The principal liturgical service of the Church, including a scripture service and a eucharistic service, which includes the consecration and oblation (offering) of the host and wine. One of the seven sacraments.
  2. A similar ceremony offered by a number of Christian sects.
  3. (music) A musical composition set to portions of the Mass.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

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Anagrams


Faroese

Proper noun

Mass m

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes

Patronymics

  • son of Mass: Massson
  • daughter of Mass: Massdóttir

Declension

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Mass
Accusative Mass
Dative Massi
Genitive Mass

German

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

Mass

  1. Switzerland and Liechtenstein standard spelling of Maß.

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɑs

Etymology 1

From Latin. Cognate with English mass, German Messe, Danish messe, Dutch mis.

Noun

Mass f (plural Massen)

  1. mass (religious service)
  2. Mass (the Eucharist)
Derived terms
  • Doudemass
  • Fréimass
  • Krankemass

Etymology 2

Borrowing from French masse.

Noun

Mass f (plural Massen)

  1. mass (great quantity)
  2. paste, dough
  3. (physics) mass, weight
  4. (electronics) earth, ground

mass

mass

See also: Mass, maß, Maß, Mass., and måss

English

A mass (aggregation) of frog eggs

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mæs/
  • Rhymes: -æs

Noun

mass (countable and uncountable, plural masses)

  1. (physical) Matter, material.
    1. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size; as, a mass of ore, metal, sand, or water.
      • 1718 [1704], Isaac Newton, Opticks, Second Edition:
        And if it were not for theſe Principles the Bodies of the Earth, Planets, Comets, Sun, and all things in them would grow cold and freeze, and become inactive Maſſes ; [] .
      • 1821, George Buchanan (Latin original Rerum Scoticarum Historia, 1582), translator not named, The History of Scotland, from the Earliest Accounts of that Nation, to the Reign of King James VI, Volume 1, page 133,
        [] and because a deep mass of continual sea is slower stirred to rage.
    2. (obsolete) Precious metal, especially gold or silver.
    3. (physics) The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume. It is one of four fundamental properties of matter. It is measured in kilograms in the SI system of measurement.
    4. (pharmacy) A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass.
    5. (medicine) A palpable or visible abnormal globular structure; a tumor.
    6. (bodybuilding) Excess body weight, especially in the form of muscle hypertrophy.
      • 1988, Steve Holman, "Christian Conquers Columbus", Ironman 47 (6): 28-34.
        After all, muscle maniacs go "ga ga" over mass no matter how it's presented.
  2. A large quantity; a sum.
    • 1829, Sir Walter Raleigh, The Works of Sir Walter Ralegh, Kt, Volume VIII,
      [] he hath discovered to me the way to five or six of the richest mines which the Spaniard hath, and whence all the mass of gold that comes into Spain in effect is drawn.
    • 1869, Alexander George Richey, Lectures on the History of Ireland: Down to A. D. 1534, page 204,
      For though he had spent a huge mass of treasure in transporting his army, [] .
  3. (quantity) Large in number.
    1. Bulk; magnitude; body; size.
    2. The principal part; the main body.
      • 1881, Thucydides, Benjamin Jowett Thucydides translated into English, Volume 1, page 310,
        Night closed upon the pursuit, and aided the mass of the fugitives in their escape.
    3. A large body of individuals, especially persons.
      The mass of spectators didn't see the infraction on the field.
      A mass of ships converged on the beaches of Dunkirk.
    4. (in the plural) The lower classes of persons.
      The masses are revolting.
See also
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

mass (third-person singular simple present masses, present participle massing, simple past and past participle massed)

  1. (transitive) To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble.
    • 1829, William Burke, John Macnee, Trial of William Burke and Helen M'Dougal: Before the High Court of Judiciary, William Hare,
      They would unavoidably mix up the whole of these declarations, and mass them together, although the Judge might direct the Jury not to do so.
    • 1857, Edward Henry Nolan, The Illustrated History of the War against Russia, Parts 93-111, page 432,
      Every bend on the hill had acted like a funnel to mass them together in this peculiar way.
    • 1869, H. P. Robinson, Pictorial Effect in Photography: Being Hints on Composition and Chiariscuro for Photographers,
      Where there is too great a repetition of forms, light and shade will break them up or mass them together.
  2. (intransitive) To have a certain mass.
    I mass 70 kilograms
Translations

Adjective

mass (not comparable)

  1. Involving a mass of things; concerning a large quantity or number.
    There is evidence of mass extinctions in the distant past.
    • 1988, V. V. Zagladin, Vitaly Baskakov, International Working Class and Communist Movement: Historical Record, 1830s to Mid-1940s, page 236,
      The national liberation movement had not yet developed to a sufficiently mass scale.
    • 1989, Creighton Peden, Larry E. Axel (editors), God, Values, and Empiricism: Issues in Philosophical Theology, page 2,
      With perhaps unprecedented magnitude and clarity, Auschwitz brings theologians and philosophers face to face with the facts of suffering on an incredibly mass scale, with issues poignantly raised concerning the absence of divine intervention or the inadequacies of divine power or benevolence; [] .
    • 2010, John Horne, A Companion to World War I, page 159,
      The air arms did more than provide the warring nations with individual heroes, for their individual exploits occurred within the context of an increasingly mass aerial effort in a war of the masses.
  2. Involving a mass of people; of, for, or by the masses.
    Mass unemployment resulted from the financial collapse.
    • 1958, Child Welfare, volume 37, page 2:
      Every agency is sold on use of mass media today — or at least, it thinks it is — and what can be "masser" than television?
    • 1970, James Wilson White, The Sōkagakkai and Mass Society, page 3,
      While agreeing with Bell on the unlikelihood that any fully mass — in the sense of atomized and alienated — society has ever existed,5 I believe that at any point in time, in any social system, some elements may be characterized as "masses."
    • 1974, Edward Abraham Cohn, The Political Economy of Environmental Enhancement, page 91:
      Undoubtedly this is the case; at least it is "masser" than in Pinchot's time.
    • 1999 December, Sara Miles, Rebel with a Cause, in Out, page 132,
      But it also highlights the changes that have taken place in gay and AIDS activism, and the way that a formerly mass movement has been recast.
    • 2000, Howie Klein, Queer as role models, in The Advocate, number 825, 21 November 2000, page 9:
      The director didn't make the images up; they're there, but in putting that one slice of gay life into the massest of mass media — the amoral promiscuity, the drug and alcohol abuse, the stereotyped flamboyance and campiness, the bitchy queeniness and flimsy values — something very dangerous happens [...]
    • 2001, Brian Moeran. Asian Media Productions, page 13:
      [...] if only because it promises the ‘massest’ of mass markets.
    • 2004, John R. Hall, Gone from the Promised Land: Jonestown in American Cultural History, page 79,
      Finally, in the past century, secular culture itself has undergone a transition from predominantly folk styles to an overwhelmingly mass culture, [] .
    • 2007, Thomas Peele, Queer popular culture: literature, media, film, and television, page 11:
      As a right, we come to expect it, and that happens through the mass media, the massest of which, by far, is television.
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

A priest celebrating mass (the Mass)

From Middle English masse, from Old English mæsse (the mass, church festival), from Vulgar Latin *messa (Eucharist, dismissal), from Late Latin missa, noun use of feminine past participle of classical Latin mittere (to send). Compare Dutch mis (mass), German Messe (mass), Danish messe (mass), Icelandic messa (mass). More at mission.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑːs
  • (US) IPA(key): /mæs/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /mæs/, /mɑːs/
  • Rhymes: -æs

Noun

mass (plural masses)

  1. (Christianity) The Eucharist, now especially in Roman Catholicism.
  2. (Christianity) Celebration of the Eucharist.
  3. (Christianity, usually as the Mass) The sacrament of the Eucharist.
  4. A musical setting of parts of the mass.
Translations

Verb

mass (third-person singular simple present masses, present participle massing, simple past and past participle massed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To celebrate mass.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hooker to this entry?)
Translations

External links

  • mass in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • mass in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams


Võro

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finnic *maksa, from Proto-Uralic *mëksa.

Noun

mass (genitive massa, partitive massa)

  1. liver
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2

Related to Estonian maks.

Noun

mass (genitive massu, partitive massu)

  1. tax, payment
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.