Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Me

Me

(mē̍)
,
p
ron.
One. See
Men
,
p
ron.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Me

(mē)
,
p
ers.
p
ron.
[AS.
mē
, dat. & acc.,
mec
, acc. only ; akin to D.
mij
, G.
mich
, Icel. & Goth.
mik
, L.
me
, Gr.
μέ
,
ἐμέ
, Skr.
mā
,
mām
. √187. Cf. 2d
Mine
.]
The person speaking, regarded as an object; myself; a pronoun of the first person used as the objective and dative case of the pronoum I;
as, he struck
me
; he gave
me
the money, or he gave the money to
me
; he got
me
a hat, or he got a hat for
me
.
☞ In methinks, me is properly in the dative case, and the verb is impersonal, the construction being, it appears to me. In early use me was often placed before forms of the verb to be with an adjective; as, me were lief.
Me
rather had my heart might frrl your love
Than my unpleased eye see your courtesy.
Shakespeare

Webster 1828 Edition


Me

ME

, pron. pers.; the objective case of I, answering to the oblique cases of ego, in Latin. [L. mihi.] Follow me; give to me; go with me. The phrase 'I followed me close,' is not in use. Before think, as in methinks, me is properly in the dative case,and the verb is impersonal; the construction is, it appears to me.

Definition 2022


See also: Appendix:Variations of "me"

Irish

Pronoun

(conjunctive and disjunctive)

  1. I, me
    anseo. ― I am here.
    Feiceann sé . ― He sees me.

See also


Ladin

Etymology

From Latin Māius.

Noun

 m (plural més)

  1. May (month)

Norman

Etymology 1

From Old French mei, mi (me), from Latin (me), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- (me).

Pronoun

  1. (Guernsey) me

Etymology 2

From Old French mer, from Latin mare, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation

Noun

 f (plural mers)

  1. (Jersey, France, geography) sea
Alternative forms
Derived terms

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *mī, from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-, *(e)me-n- (me) (compare Sanskrit मा (), Ancient Greek με (me), Latin , Welsh mi).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mʲeː/

Pronoun

  1. I
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 5b17
      Is as apstal geinte.
      It is I who am the apostle of the gentiles.

Related terms

Descendants

  • Irish:
  • Scottish Gaelic: mi
  • Manx: mee

Venetian

Etymology

From Latin meus.

Pronoun

(possessive)

  1. mine