Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Log

Log

,
Noun.
[Heb.
lōg
.]
A Hebrew measure of liquids, containing 2.37 gills.
W. H. Ward.

Log

,
Noun.
[Icel.
lāg
a felled tree, log; akin to E.
lie
. See
Lie
to lie prostrate.]
1.
A bulky piece of wood which has not been shaped by hewing or sawing.
2.
[Prob. the same word as in sense 1; cf. LG.
log
,
lock
, Dan.
log
, Sw.
logg
.]
(Naut.)
An apparatus for measuring the rate of a ship’s motion through the water.
☞ The common log consists of the log-chip, or logship, often exclusively called the log, and the log line, the former being commonly a thin wooden quadrant of five or six inches radius, loaded with lead on the arc to make it float with the point up. It is attached to the log line by cords from each corner. This line is divided into equal spaces, called knots, each bearing the same proportion to a mile that half a minute does to an hour. The line is wound on a reel which is so held as to let it run off freely. When the log is thrown, the log-chip is kept by the water from being drawn forward, and the speed of the ship is shown by the number of knots run out in half a minute. There are improved logs, consisting of a piece of mechanism which, being towed astern, shows the distance actually gone through by the ship, by means of the revolutions of a fly, which are registered on a dial plate.
5.
(Mining)
A weight or block near the free end of a hoisting rope to prevent it from being drawn through the sheave.
Log board
(Naut.)
,
a board consisting of two parts shutting together like a book, with columns in which are entered the direction of the wind, course of the ship, etc., during each hour of the day and night. These entries are transferred to the log book. A folding slate is now used instead.
Log book
, or
Logbook
(Naut.)
,
(a)
a book in which is entered the daily progress of a ship at sea, as indicated by the log, with notes on the weather and incidents of the voyage; the contents of the log board.
(b)
a book in which a log{4} is recorded.
Log cabin
,
Log house
,
a cabin or house made of logs.
Log canoe
,
a canoe made by shaping and hollowing out a single log; a dugout canoe.
Log glass
(Naut.)
,
a small sandglass used to time the running out of the log line.
Log line
(Naut.)
,
a line or cord about a hundred and fifty fathoms long, fastened to the log-chip. See Note under 2d
Log
,
Noun.
, 2.
Log perch
(Zool.)
,
an ethiostomoid fish, or darter (
Percina caprodes
); – called also
hogfish
and
rockfish
.
Log reel
(Naut.)
,
the reel on which the log line is wound.
Log slate
.
(Naut.)
See
Log board
(above).
Rough log
(Naut.)
,
a first draught of a record of the cruise or voyage.
Smooth log
(Naut.)
,
a clean copy of the rough log. In the case of naval vessels this copy is forwarded to the proper officer of the government.
To heave the log
(Naut.)
,
to cast the log-chip into the water; also, the whole process of ascertaining a vessel's speed by the log.

Log

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Logged
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Logging
.]
1.
(Naut.)
,
To enter in a ship's log book;
as, to
log
the miles run
.
J. F. Cooper.

Log

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To engage in the business of cutting or transporting logs for timber; to get out logs.
[U.S.]
2.
To move to and fro; to rock.
[Obs.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Log

LOG

,
Noun.
1.
A bulky piece or stick of timer unhewed. Pine logs are floated down rivers in America, and stopped at saw-mills. A piece of timber when hewed or squared, is not called a log, unless perhaps in constructing log-huts.
2.
In navigation, a machine for measuring the rate of a ship's velocity through the water. The common log is a piece of board, forming the quadrant of a circle of about six inches radius, balanced by a small plate of lead nailed on the circular part, so as to swim perpendicular.
3.
[Heb.] A Hebrew measure of liquids, containing, according to some authors, three quarters of a pint; according to others, five sixths of a pint. According to Arbuthnot, it was the seventy second part of the bath or ephab, and the twelfth part of a hin.

LOG

,
Verb.
I.
To move to and fro. [Not used.]

Definition 2021


log

log

See also: lóg, lög, løg, log., -log, and løg-
For the list of public logs on this wiki, see Special:Log.

Translingual

Symbol

log

  1. (mathematics) logarithm
    if then

Hyponyms

  • (logarithm): (with base e) ln, (with base 10) lg, (with base 2) lb

Usage notes

If not specified, the assumed base of the logarithm is either 10 or e, depending on context.

Related terms

Translations


English

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. The trunk of a dead tree, cleared of branches.
    They walked across the stream on a fallen log.
  2. Any bulky piece as cut from the above, used as timber, fuel etc.
    • 1995: New American Standard Bible: Matthew 7, 3 5
      Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, "Let me take the speck out of your eye," and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother's eye.
  3. Anything shaped like a log; a cylinder.
    • 1999, Glen Duncan, Hope
      [] it was a thing of sinuous durability, wound around the spirit like a tapeworm around a log of ****.
    • 2011, Edward Espe Brown, The Complete Tassajara Cookbook
      Dip both sides in the sauce on the plate and then arrange a log of cheese filling down the middle of the tortilla.
  4. (nautical) A floating device, usually of wood, used in navigation to estimate the speed of a vessel through water.
  5. A logbook.
  6. (figuratively) A blockhead; a very stupid person.
  7. (surfing slang) A longboard.
    • 1999, Neal Miyake
      I know he hadn’t surfed on a log much in his childhood
  8. (figuratively) A rolled cake with filling.
  9. (mining) A weight or block near the free end of a hoisting rope to prevent it from being drawn through the sheave.
  10. (vulgar) A piece of feces.
Synonyms
  • (logbook):
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To cut trees into logs.
  2. (transitive) To cut down (trees).
    • 2013 June 29, Unspontaneous combustion”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 29:
      Since the mid-1980s, when Indonesia first began to clear its bountiful forests on an industrial scale in favour of lucrative palm-oil plantations, “haze” has become an almost annual occurrence in South-East Asia. The cheapest way to clear logged woodland is to burn it, producing an acrid cloud of foul white smoke that, carried by the wind, can cover hundreds, or even thousands, of square miles.
  3. (transitive) To travel at a specified speed, as ascertained by chip log.
  4. (intransitive) To cut down trees in an area, harvesting and transporting the logs as wood.
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From logbook, itself from log (above) + book, from a wooden float (chip log, or simply log) used to measure speed.

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. A logbook, or journal of a vessel (or aircraft)'s progress
  2. A chronological record of actions, performances, computer/network usage, etc.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To make, to add an entry (or more) in a log or logbook.
    to log the miles travelled by a ship
  2. (transitive) To travel (a distance) as shown in a logbook
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Verb

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (obsolete) To move to and fro; to rock.

Etymology 4

Hebrew

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. A Hebrew measure of liquids, containing 2.37 gills.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. H. Ward to this entry?)

Etymology 5

From logarithm.

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. logarithm.
    To multiply two numbers, add their logs.
Derived terms

References

  1. Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], ISBN 0550142304), p. 607.
  2. J[ohn] A. Simpson and E[dward] S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “log”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, ISBN 978-0-19-861186-8.

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *legh- 'to put down, to lie down'. Compare Old Frisian lōch, Dutch oorlog (war), Middle High German urlage (fate, battle), Old English log 'place', Old Norse løgi (tranquillity), Greek λόχος (lóchos, confinement), Tocharian A lake, Tocharian B leke 'lair', Old Irish lige (bad, grave).

Noun

log m (indefinite plural logje, definite singular logu, definite plural logët)

  1. battlefield, ground (where warriors or men gather for council)
  2. level patch (of ground)
Related terms

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔx

Etymology 1

Presumably Germanic, cognates may include English log, lag, Middle Low German luggich 'slow'

Adjective

log (comparative logger, superlative logst)

  1. lumbering, inert, slow in movement; immobile
  2. (originally) plumb, (too) heavy in built ande/or weight
  3. cumbersome, hard to move or change
  4. dull, uninspired
Inflection
Inflection of log
uninflected log
inflected logge
comparative logger
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial log logger het logst
het logste
indefinite m./f. sing. logge loggere logste
n. sing. log logger logste
plural logge loggere logste
definite logge loggere logste
partitive logs loggers
Derived terms
  • logheid
  • logte
  • loggat
  • loggroot (adjective)
  • logzwaar (adjective)
  • verloggen

Etymology 2

Germanic: cognate with liegen 'to (tell a) lie', German lügen

Noun

log n (plural loggen, diminutive logje n)

  1. A lie, violation of the truth
Derived terms
  • logbaar
  • onlogbaar

Etymology 3

Germanic: from equivalent German Loch 'hole, opening, cavity'

Noun

log n (plural loggen)

  1. (obsolete) An alternative form of loch
Derived terms
  • jammerlog n
  • loggat n
  • schutlog n

Etymology 4

Germanic: from English log (see above), sense (and short for) chip log

Noun

log m (plural loggen, diminutive logje n)

  1. A chip log, instrument to measure a vessel's speed
Synonyms
  • (derivation) logplankje n
Derived terms
  • (by type) leklog, handlog, patentlog
  • logboek n (perhaps from English logbook)
  • loggen
  • logglas n
  • loggekas
  • loglijn, loglijnknoop
  • logmerk n
  • logrol
  • logschuitje n
  • logtafel

German

Verb

log

  1. First-person singular preterite of lügen.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of lügen.

Old English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *lōgą, from Proto-Indo-European *legh-. Cognate with Old Frisian lōch, Old High German luog. The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek λέκτρον (léktron), Latin lectus (bed), Albanian log (place for men, gathering), Proto-Celtic *leg- (Old Irish lige, Irish luighe), Proto-Slavic *ležati (Russian лежа́ть (ležátʹ)).

Noun

lōg n

  1. A place, stead
    on his log ― in his place; instead of him
Related terms

Etymology 2

Inflected forms.

Verb

lōg

  1. first-person singular preterite of lēan
  2. third-person singular preterite of lēan

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From lèžati.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lôːɡ/

Noun

lȏg m (Cyrillic spelling ло̑г)

  1. (archaic) bed

Declension

References

  • log” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlóːk/
  • Tonal orthography: lọ̑g

Noun

lóg m inan (genitive lóga, nominative plural lógi)

  1. grove
  2. small forest

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Swedish

Verb

log

  1. past tense of le.

Volapük

Etymology

Compound of French le and German Auge

Noun

log (plural logs)

  1. eye

Declension

Derived terms