Definify.com

Webster 1828 Edition


Day

DAY

n.
1.
That part of the time of the earth's revolution on its axis, in which its surface is presented to the sun; the part of the twenty four hours when it is light; or the space of time between the rising and setting of the sun; called the artificial day
And God called the light day Gen. I.
In this sense, the day may commence at any period of the revolution. The Babylonians began the day at sun-rising; the Jews, at sun-setting; the Egyptians, at midnight, as do several nations in modern times, the British, French, Spanish, American, etc. This day in reference to civil transactions, is called the civil day Thus with us the day when a legal instrument is dated, begins and ends at midnight.
3.
Light; sunshine.
Let us walk honestly as in the day Romans 13:12.
4.
Time specified; any period of time distinguished from other time; age; time with reference to the existence of a person or thing.
He was a useful man in his day
In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely
die. Genesis 2:2.
In this sense, the plural is often used; as, from the days of the judges; in the days of our fathers. In this sense also, the word is often equivalent to life, or earthly existence.
5.
The contest of a day; battle; or day of combat.
The day is his own.
He won the day that is, he gained the victory.
6.
An appointed or fixed time.
If my debtors do not keep their day Dryden.
7.
Time of commemorating an event; anniversary; the same day of the month, in any future year. We celebrate the day of our Savior's birth.

DAY

by day daily; every day; each day in succession; continually; without intermission of a day

DAY

by day we magnify thee. Common Prayer.
But or only from day to day without certainty of continuance; temporarily.
To-day, adverb On the present day; this day; or at the present time.

DAY

s of grace, in theology, the time when mercy is offered to sinners.
To-day, if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts. Psalms 95:7.

DAY

s of grace, in law, are days granted by the court for delay, at the prayer of the plaintiff or defendant.
Three days, beyond the day named in the writ, in which the person summoned may appear and answer.

DAY

s of grace, in commerce, a customary number of days, in Great Britain and America, three, allowed for the payment of a note or bill of exchange, after it becomes due. A note due on the seventh of the month is payable on the tenth.
The days of grace are different in different countries. In France, they are ten; at Naples, Eight; at Venice, Amsterdam and Antwerp, six; at Hamburg, Twelve; in Spain, fourteen; in Genoa, thirty.

DAY

s in bank, in England, days of appearance in the court of common bench.

Definition 2022


Day

Day

See also: day, dày, dây, dạy, dậy, and Appendix:Variations of "day"

English

Proper noun

Day

  1. A patronymic surname derived from a medieval diminutive of David.[3]
  2. An English surname from day as a word for a "day-servant", an archaic term for a day-laborer,[4] or from given names such as Dagr, Daug, Dege, and Dey, cognate with Scandinavian Dag.[5]
  3. An Irish surname anglicised from Ó Deághaidh (descendant of a person named Good Luck).

References

  • Patrick Hanks and Flavia Hodges : A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford University Press 1988.
  • Notes:
  1. Elisabeth Alice Gibbens Cole, An Account of Our Day Family of Calvert County, Maryland (1940), p. 49.
  2. Day Surname Origin & Last Name Meaning at Ancestor Search.
  3. Day Surname Origin & Last Name Meaning at Ancestor Search.
  4. Ernest Weekley, The Romance of Words (1927), p. 165.
  5. Susa Young Gates, Surname Book and Racial History (1918) p. 289.

Etymology 2

Proper noun

Day

  1. A Mbum-Day language of Chad.

Anagrams

day

day

See also: Day, dày, dây, dạy, dậy, and Appendix:Variations of "day"

English

Alternative forms

Noun

day (plural days)

  1. Any period of 24 hours.
    I've been here for two days and a bit.
  2. A period from midnight to the following midnight.
    The day begins at midnight.
  3. (astronomy) Rotational period of a planet (especially Earth).
    A day on Mars is slightly over 24 hours.
  4. The part of a day period which one spends at one’s job, school, etc.
    I worked two days last week.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      [] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. []
  5. Part of a day period between sunrise and sunset where one enjoys daylight; daytime.
    day and night; I work at night and sleep during the day.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      The day was cool and snappy for August, and the Rise all green with a lavish nature. Now we plunged into a deep shade with the boughs lacing each other overhead, and crossed dainty, rustic bridges over the cold trout-streams, [].
  6. A specified time or period; time, considered with reference to the existence or prominence of a person or thing; age; time.
    Every dog has its day.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. [] Indeed, all his features were in large mold, like the man himself, as though he had come from a day when skin garments made the proper garb of men.
    • If they had no more food than they had had in Jones's day, at least they did not have less.
    • 2011, Kat Martin, A Song for My Mother[200], Vanguard Press, ISBN 9781593156565:
      In his senior year, he had run across an old '66 Chevy Super Sport headed for the junkyard, bought it for a song, and overhauled it with his dad's help, turning it into the big red muscle car it was back in its day.
  7. A period of contention of a day or less.
    The day belonged to the Allies.

Antonyms

  • (period between sunrise and sunset): night

Hypernyms

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

Verb

day (third-person singular simple present days, present participle daying, simple past and past participle dayed)

  1. (rare, intransitive) To spend a day (in a place).
    • 2008, Richard F. Burton, Arabian Nights, in 16 volumes, page 233:
      When I nighted and dayed in Damascus town, []

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: def · might · being · #114: day · through · himself · go

Anagrams


Cebuano

Etymology

Initial clipping of inday.

Pronunciation

  • (General Cebuano) IPA(key): /ˈd̪aɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Hyphenation: day

Noun

day

  1. (colloquial) A familiar address to a girl.
  2. A familiar address to a daughter.

Kalasha

Pronoun + verb

day

  1. I am

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English dæġ.

Noun

day (plural days)

  1. day

Descendants


Scots

Etymology

From Old English dæġ.

Noun

day (plural days)

  1. day
  2. (in the definite singular) today
    • A’m sorry, A’ve no seen Angus the day.
      I’m sorry, I haven’t seen Angus today.