Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Casus


Ca′sus

,
Noun.
[L.]
An event; an occurrence; an occasion; a combination of circumstances; a case; an act of God. See the Note under
Accident
.
Casus belli
,
an event or combination of events which is a cause war, or may be alleged as a justification of war.
Casus fortuitus
,
an accident against which due prudence could not have provided. See
Act of God
, under
Act
.
Casus omissus
,
a case not provided for by the statute.
☞ The domestic cat includes many varieties named from their place of origin or from some peculiarity; as, the
Angora cat
; the
Maltese cat
; the
Manx cat
; the
Siamese cat
.
The word
cat
is also used to designate other animals, from some fancied resemblance; as, civet
cat
, fisher
cat
,
cat
bird,
cat
fish shark, sea
cat
.
2.
(Naut.)
(a)
A strong vessel with a narrow stern, projecting quarters, and deep waist. It is employed in the coal and timber trade.
(b)
A strong tackle used to draw an anchor up to the cathead of a ship.
Totten.
3.
A double tripod (for holding a plate, etc.), having six feet, of which three rest on the ground, in whatever position it is placed.
4.
An old game;
specifically:
(a)
The game of tipcat and the implement with which it is played. See
Tipcat
.
(b)
A game of ball, called, according to the number of batters, one old cat, two old cat, etc.
Angora cat
,
blind cat
,
See under
Angora
,
Blind
.
Black cat
the fisher. See under
Black
.
Cat and dog
,
like a cat and dog; quarrelsome; inharmonious.
“I am sure we have lived a cat and dog life of it.”
Coleridge.
Cat block
(Naut.)
,
a heavy iron-strapped block with a large hook, part of the tackle used in drawing an anchor up to the cathead.
Cat hook
(Naut.)
,
a strong hook attached to a cat block.
Cat nap
,
a very short sleep.
[Colloq.]
Cat o’ nine tails
,
an instrument of punishment consisting of nine pieces of knotted line or cord fastened to a handle; – formerly used to flog offenders on the bare back.
Cat's cradle
,
game played, esp. by children, with a string looped on the fingers so, as to resemble small cradle. The string is transferred from the fingers of one to those of another, at each transfer with a change of form. See
Cratch
,
Cratch cradle
.
To bell the cat
,
to perform a very dangerous or very difficult task; – taken metaphorically from a fable about a mouse who proposes to put a bell on a cat, so as to be able to hear the cat coming.
To let the cat out of the bag
,
to tell a secret, carelessly or willfully.
[Colloq.]
Bush cat
,
the serval. See
Serval
.

Definition 2022


casus

casus

See also: casûs and ĉasus

Dutch

Noun

casus m (plural casussen or casus, diminutive casusje n)

  1. A case, occurrence, instance, especially used for a reference or teaching example and for a legal case
  2. (grammar) A case, (instance of) grammatical case
  3. A coincidence

Synonyms

Related terms

  • casuïstiek

Latin

Etymology

Perfect passive participle of cadō (I fall). The grammatical sense originated as a literal translation or calque of Ancient Greek πτῶσις (ptôsis).

Pronunciation

Participle

cāsus m (feminine cāsa, neuter cāsum); first/second declension

  1. fallen; having fallen

Inflection

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative cāsus cāsa cāsum cāsī cāsae cāsa
genitive cāsī cāsae cāsī cāsōrum cāsārum cāsōrum
dative cāsō cāsō cāsīs
accusative cāsum cāsam cāsum cāsōs cāsās cāsa
ablative cāsō cāsā cāsō cāsīs
vocative cāse cāsa cāsum cāsī cāsae cāsa

Related terms

Noun

cāsus m (genitive cāsūs); fourth declension

  1. fall, downwards movement
  2. accident, chance
  3. an event, happening, occurrence
  4. misfortune, disaster, accident
  5. (grammar) A case, termination

Inflection

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cāsus cāsūs
genitive cāsūs cāsuum
dative cāsuī cāsibus
accusative cāsum cāsūs
ablative cāsū cāsibus
vocative cāsus cāsūs

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • casus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • casus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • CASUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), “casus”, in Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book, London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to foresee the far distant future: futura or casus futuros (multo ante) prospicere
    • by some chance or other: nescio quo casu (with Indic.)
    • the changes and chances of this life: ancipites et varii casus
    • to have to submit to the uncertainties of fortune; to be subject to Fortune's caprice: sub varios incertosque casus subiectum esse
    • to experience the ups and downs of life: multis casibus iactari
    • to be prepared for all that may come: ad omnes casus subsidia comparare
    • to prepare oneself for all contingencies: ad omnes casus se comparare
    • to foresee political events long before: longe prospicere futuros casus rei publicae (De Amic. 12. 40)
    • (ambiguous) affairs are desperate; we are reduced to extremeties: res ad extremum casum perducta est
  • casus in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700, pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • casus in William Smith., editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Turkish

Etymology

From Arabic جَاسُوس (jāsūs).

Noun

casus (definite accusative casusu, plural casuslar)

  1. spy

Declension

See also