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Webster 1913 Edition


Anger

An′ger

(aṉ′gẽr)
,
Noun.
[OE.
anger
,
angre
, affliction, anger, fr. Icel.
angr
affliction, sorrow; akin to Dan.
anger
regret, Swed.
ånger
regret, AS.
ange
oppressed, sad, L.
angor
a strangling, anguish,
angere
to strangle, Gr.
ἄγχειν
to strangle, Skr.
aṁhas
pain, and to E.
anguish
,
anxious
,
quinsy
, and perh.
awe
,
ugly
. The word seems to have orig. meant to
choke
,
squeeze
. √3.]
1.
Trouble; vexation; also, physical pain or smart of a sore, etc.
[Obs.]
I made the experiment, setting the moxa where . . . the greatest
anger
and soreness still continued.
Temple.
2.
A strong passion or emotion of displeasure or antagonism, excited by a real or supposed injury or insult to one’s self or others, or by the intent to do such injury.
Anger
is like
A full hot horse, who being allowed his way,
Self-mettle tires him.
Shakespeare
Syn. – Resentment; wrath; rage; fury; passion; ire gall; choler; indignation; displeasure; vexation; grudge; spleen.
Anger
,
Indignation
,
Resentment
,
Wrath
,
Ire
,
Rage
,
Fury
. Anger is a feeling of keen displeasure (usually with a desire to punish) for what we regard as wrong toward ourselves or others. It may be excessive or misplaced, but is not necessarily criminal. Indignation is a generous outburst of anger in view of things which are indigna, or unworthy to be done, involving what is mean, cruel, flagitious, etc., in character or conduct. Resentment is often a moody feeling, leading one to brood over his supposed personal wrongs with a deep and lasting anger. See
Resentment
. Wrath and ire (the last poetical) express the feelings of one who is bitterly provoked. Rage is a vehement ebullition of anger; and fury is an excess of rage, amounting almost to madness. Warmth of constitution often gives rise to anger; a high sense of honor creates indignation at crime; a man of quick sensibilities is apt to cherish resentment; the wrath and ire of men are often connected with a haughty and vindictive spirit; rage and fury are distempers of the soul to be regarded only with abhorrence.

An′ger

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Angered
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Angering
.]
[Cf. Icel.
angra
.]
1.
To make painful; to cause to smart; to inflame.
[Obs.]
He . . .
angereth
malign ulcers.
Bacon.
2.
To excite to anger; to enrage; to provoke.
Taxes and impositions . . . which rather
angered
than grieved the people.
Clarendon.

Webster 1828 Edition


Anger

AN'GER

,
Noun.
ang'ger. [L. ango, to choke strangle, vex; whence angor, vexation, anguish, the quinsy, angina. Gr. to strangle, to strain or draw together to vex. The primary sense is to press, squeeze, make narrow; Heb. to strangle.]
1.
A violent passion of the mind excited by a real or supposed injury; usually accompanied with a propensity to take vengeance, or to obtain satisfaction from the offending party. This passion however varies in degrees of violence, and in ingenuous minds, may be attended only with a desire to reprove or chide the offender.
Anger is also excited by an injury offered to a relation, friend or party to which one is attached; and some degrees of it may be excited by cruelty, injustice or oppression offered to those with whom one has no immediate connection, or even to the community of which one is a member. Nor is it unusual to see something of this passion roused by gross absurdities in others, especially in controversy or discussion. Anger may be inflamed till it rises to rage and a temporary delirium.
2.
Paint; smart of a sore or swelling; the literal sense of the word, but little used.

AN'GER

,
Verb.
T.
ang'ger.
1.
To excite anger; to provoke; to rouse resentment.
2.
To make painful; to cause to smart; to inflame; as, to anger an ulcer.

Definition 2022


anger

anger

See also: ånger

English

Noun

anger (countable and uncountable, plural angers)

  1. A strong feeling of displeasure, hostility or antagonism towards someone or something, usually combined with an urge to harm.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, Our banks are out of control”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21:
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic [].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures.
    You need to control your anger.
  2. (obsolete) Pain or stinging.
    • 1660, Simon Patrick, Mensa mystica, published 1717, page 322:
      It heals the Wounds that Sin hath made; and takes away the Anger of the Sore; []
    • Temple
      I made the experiment, setting the moxa where [] the greatest anger and soreness still continued.

Synonyms

  • (strong feeling of antagonism):
  • See also Wikisaurus:anger

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

anger (third-person singular simple present angers, present participle angering, simple past and past participle angered)

  1. (transitive) To cause such a feeling of antagonism.
    Don't anger me.
  2. (intransitive) To become angry.
    You anger too easily.

Synonyms

Translations

References

  • anger in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • Notes:
  1. anger in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse angr.

Noun

anger m (definite singular angeren) (uncountable)

  1. regret, remorse, contrition, repentance, penitence

Related terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse angr.

Noun

anger m (definite singular angeren) (uncountable)

  1. regret, remorse, contrition, repentance, penitence

Related terms

References


Swedish

Verb

anger

  1. present tense of ange.