Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Vein

Vein

,
Noun.
[OE.
veine
, F.
veine
, L.
vena
.]
1.
(Anat.)
One of the vessels which carry blood, either venous or arterial, to the heart. See
Artery
, 2.
2.
(Bot.)
One of the similar branches of the framework of a leaf.
3.
(Zool.)
One of the ribs or nervures of the wings of insects. See
Venation
.
4.
(Geol. or Mining)
A narrow mass of rock intersecting other rocks, and filling inclined or vertical fissures not corresponding with the stratification; a lode; a dike; – often limited, in the language of miners, to a mineral vein or lode, that is, to a vein which contains useful minerals or ores.
5.
A fissure, cleft, or cavity, as in the earth or other substance.
“Down to the veins of earth.”
Milton.
Let the glass of the prisms be free from
veins
.
Sir I. Newton.
6.
A streak or wave of different color, appearing in wood, and in marble and other stones; variegation.
7.
A train of associations, thoughts, emotions, or the like; a current; a course;
as, reasoning in the same
vein
.
He can open a
vein
of true and noble thinking.
Swift.
8.
Peculiar temper or temperament; tendency or turn of mind; a particular disposition or cast of genius; humor; strain; quality; also, manner of speech or action;
as, a rich
vein
of humor; a satirical
vein
.
Shak.
Certain discoursing wits which are of the same
veins
.
Bacon.
Invoke the Muses, and improve my
vein
.
Waller.

Vein

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Veined
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Veining
.]
To form or mark with veins; to fill or cover with veins.
Tennyson.

Webster 1828 Edition


Vein

VEIN

,
Noun.
[L. vena, from the root of venio, to come, to pass. The sense is a passage, a conduit.]
1.
A vessel in animal bodies, which receives the blood from the extreme arteries, and returns it to the heart. The veins may be arranged in three divisions. 1. Those that commence from the capillaries all over the body, and return the blood to the heart. 2. The pulmonary veins. 3. The veins connected with the vena portarum, in which the blood that has circulated through the organs of digestion, is conveyed to the liver.
2.
In plants, a tube or an assemblage of tubes, through which the sap is transmitted along the leaves. The term is more properly applied to the finer and more complex ramifications, which interbranch with each other like net-work; the larger and more direct assemblages of vessels being called ribs and nerves. Veins are also found in the calyx and corol of flowers.
The vessels which branch or variously divide over the surface of leaves are called veins.
3.
In geology, a fissure in rocks or strata, filled with a particular substance. Thus metallic veins intersect rocks or strata of other substances. Metalliferous veins have been traced in the earth for miles; some in South America are said to have been traced eighty miles. Many species of stones, as granite, porphyry, &c. are often found in veins.
4.
A streak or wave of different color, appearing in wood, marble, and other stones; variegation.
5.
A cavity or fissure in the earth or in other substance.
6.
Tendency or turn of mind; a particular disposition or cast of genius; as a rich vein of wit or humor; a satirical vein
Invoke the muses, and improve my vein.
7.
Current.
He can open a vein of true and noble thinking.
8.
Humor; particular temper.
9.
Strain; quality; as my usual vein.

Definition 2021


vein

vein

See also: veîn

English

Noun

Veins of the arm

vein (plural veins)

  1. (anatomy) A blood vessel that transports blood from the capillaries back to the heart
  2. (used in plural veins) The entrails of a shrimp
  3. (botany) In leaves, a thickened portion of the leaf containing the vascular bundle
  4. (zoology) The nervure of an insect’s wing
  5. A stripe or streak of a different colour or composition in materials such as wood, cheese, marble or other rocks
  6. A topic of discussion; a train of association, thoughts, emotions, etc.
    ...in the same vein...
    • Jonathan Swift
      He can open a vein of true and noble thinking.
  7. A style, tendency, or quality.
    The play is in a satirical vein.
    • Francis Bacon
      certain discoursing wits which are of the same veins
    • Waller
      Invoke the Muses, and improve my vein.
  8. A fissure, cleft, or cavity, as in the earth or other substance.
    • Milton
      down to the veins of earth
    • Isaac Newton
      Let the glass of the prisms be free from veins.

Translations

Related terms

See also

Anagrams


Estonian

vein

Etymology

Borrowing from German Wein during the 19th century, ultimately from Latin vīnum. See also viin.

Noun

vein (genitive veini, partitive veini)

  1. wine

Declension

Derived terms


Finnish

Verb

vein

  1. First-person singular indicative past form of viedä.

Anagrams


Gallo

Etymology

From Old French vin, from Latin vīnum, from Proto-Indo-European *wóyh₁nom.

Noun

vein m (plural veins)

  1. wine

Icelandic

Noun

vein n

  1. lament