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Webster 1913 Edition


Style

Style

,
Noun.
[OE.
stile
, F.
style
, Of. also
stile
, L.
stilus
a style or writing instrument, manner or writing, mode of expression; probably for
stiglus
, meaning, a pricking instrument, and akin to E.
stick
. See
Stick
,
Verb.
T.
, and cf.
Stiletto
. The spelling with y is due to a supposed connection with Gr.
στῦλοσ
a pillar.]
1.
An instrument used by the ancients in writing on tablets covered with wax, having one of its ends sharp, and the other blunt, and somewhat expanded, for the purpose of making erasures by smoothing the wax.
2.
Hence, anything resembling the ancient style in shape or use.
Specifically: –
(a)
A pen; an author’s pen.
Dryden.
(b)
A sharp-pointed tool used in engraving; a graver.
(c)
A kind of blunt-pointed surgical instrument.
(d)
(Zool.)
A long, slender, bristlelike process, as the anal styles of insects.
(e)
[Perhaps fr. Gr.
στῦλοσ
a pillar.]
The pin, or gnomon, of a dial, the shadow of which indicates the hour. See
Gnomon
.
(f)
[Probably fr. Gr.
στῦλοσ
a pillar.]
(Bot.)
The elongated part of a pistil between the ovary and the stigma. See Illust. of
Stamen
, and of
Pistil
.
3.
Mode of expressing thought in language, whether oral or written; especially, such use of language in the expression of thought as exhibits the spirit and faculty of an artist; choice or arrangement of words in discourse; rhetorical expression.
High
style
, as when that men to kinges write.
Chaucer.
Style
is the dress of thoughts.
Chesterfield.
Proper words in proper places make the true definition of
style
.
Swift.
It is
style
alone by which posterity will judge of a great work.
I. Disraeli.
4.
Mode of presentation, especially in music or any of the fine arts; a characteristic of peculiar mode of developing in idea or accomplishing a result.
The ornamental
style
also possesses its own peculiar merit.
Sir J. Reynolds.
5.
Conformity to a recognized standard; manner which is deemed elegant and appropriate, especially in social demeanor; fashion.
According to the usual
style
of dedications.
C. Middleton.
6.
Mode or phrase by which anything is formally designated; the title; the official designation of any important body; mode of address;
as, the
style
of Majesty
.
One
style
to a gracious benefactor, another to a proud, insulting foe.
Burke.
7.
(Chron.)
A mode of reckoning time, with regard to the Julian and Gregorian calendars.
Style is Old or New. The Old Style follows the Julian manner of computing the months and days, or the calendar as established by Julius Caesar, in which every fourth year consists of 366 days, and the other years of 365 days. This is about 11 minutes in a year too much. Pope Georgy XIII. reformed the calendar by retrenching 10 days in October, 1582, in order to bring back the vernal equinox to the same day as at the time of the Council of Nice,
a. d.
325. This reformation was adopted by act of the British Parliament in 1751, by which act 11 days in September, 1752, were retrenched, and the third day was reckoned the fourteenth. This mode of reckoning is called New Style, according to which every year divisible by 4, unless it is divisible by 100 without being divisible by 400, has 366 days, and any other year 365 days.
Style of court
,
the practice or manner observed by a court in its proceedings.
Ayliffe.
Syn. – Diction; phraseology; manner; course; title. See
Diction
.

Style

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Styled
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Styling
.]
To entitle; to term, name, or call; to denominate.
Styled great conquerors.”
Milton.
How well his worth and brave adventures
styled
.
Dryden.
Syn. – To call; name; denominate; designate; term; characterize.

Webster 1828 Edition


Style

STYLE

,
Noun.
[L., Gr., a column, a pen or bodkin; from the root of the Teutonic stellen, to set or place.]
1.
Manner of writing with regard to language, or the choice and arrangement of words; as a harsh style; a dry style; a tumid or bombastic style; a loose style; a terse style; a laconic or verbose style; a flowing style; a lofty style; an elegant style; an epistolary style. The character of style depends chiefly on a happy selection and arrangement of words.
Proper words in proper places, make the true definition of style.
Let some lord but own the happy lines, how the wit brightens and the style refines!
2.
Manner of speaking appropriate to particular characters; or in general, the character of the language used.
Not style is held for base, where love well named is.
According to the usual style of dedications.
So we say, a person addresses another in a style of haughtiness, in a style or rebuke.
3.
Mode of painting; any manner of painting which is characteristic or peculiar.
The ornamental style also possesses its own peculiar merit.
4.
A particular character of music; as a grave style.
5.
Title; appellation; as the style of majesty.
Propitious hear our prayr, whether the style of Titan please thee more--
6.
Course of writing. [Not in use.]
7.
Style of court, is properly the practice observed by any court in its way of proceeding.
8.
In popular use, manner; form; as, the entertainment was prepared in excellent style.
9.
A pointed instrument formerly used in writing on tables of wax; an instrument of surgery.
10.
Something with a sharp point; a graver; the pin of a dial; written also stile.
11.
In botany, the middle portion of the pistil, connecting the stigma with the germ; sometimes called the shaft. The styles of plants are capillary, filiform, cylindric, subulate, or clavate.
12.
In chronology, a mode of reckoning time, with regard to the Julian and Gregorian calendar. Style is Old or New. The Old Style follows the Julian manner of computing the months and days, or the calendar as established by Julius Cesar, in which the year consists of 365 days and 6 hours. This is something more than 11 minutes too much, and in the course of time, between Cesar and pope Gregory XIII, this surplus amounted to 11 days. Gregory reformed the calendar by retrenching 11 days; this reformation was adopted by act of parliament in Great Britain in 1751, by which act eleven days in September, 1752 were retrenched, and the 3rd day was reckoned the 14th. This mode of reckoning is called New Style.

STYLE

,
Verb.
T.
To call; to name; to denominate; to give a title to in addressing. The emperor of Russia is styled autocrat; the king of Great Britain is styled defender of the faith.

Definition 2022


style

style

See also: stylé and -style

English

Alternative forms

Noun

style (plural styles)

  1. A manner of doing or presenting things, especially a fashionable one.
    • Chesterfield
      Style is the dress of thoughts.
    • C. Middleton
      the usual style of dedications
    • I. Disraeli
      It is style alone by which posterity will judge of a great work.
    • Sir J. Reynolds
      The ornamental style also possesses its own peculiar merit.
  2. flair; grace; fashionable skill
    As a dancer, he has a lot of style.
  3. (botany) The stalk that connects the stigma(s) to the ovary in a pistil of a flower.
  4. A traditional or legal term preceding a reference to a person who holds a title or post.
  5. A traditional or legal term used to address a person who holds a title or post.
    the style of Majesty
    • Burke
      one style to a gracious benefactor, another to a proud, insulting foe
  6. (nonstandard) A stylus.
  7. (obsolete) A pen; an author's pen.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  8. A sharp-pointed tool used in engraving; a graver.
  9. A kind of blunt-pointed surgical instrument.
  10. A long, slender, bristle-like process.
    the anal styles of insects
  11. The pin, or gnomon, of a sundial, the shadow of which indicates the hour.
  12. (computing) A visual or other modification to text or other elements of a document, such as bold or italic.
    applying styles to text in a wordprocessor
    Cascading Style Sheets

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

Verb

style (third-person singular simple present styles, present participle styling, simple past and past participle styled)

  1. (transitive) To create or give a style, fashion or image to.
  2. (transitive) To call or give a name or title to.
    • 1811, Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, chapter 10
      Marianne’s preserver, as Margaret, with more elegance than precision, stiled [sic] Willoughby, called at the cottage early the next morning to make his personal inquiries.

Translations

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Borrowed from the Latin stilus.

Pronunciation

Noun

style m (plural styles)

  1. style (clarification of this French definition is being sought)

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowing from English style.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /is.t'aj.li/, /iʃ.t'aj.li/

Adjective

style (invariable, comparable)

  1. (Brazil, slang) stylish
    Com este calçado você fica style!
    With this shoe you become stylish!