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Webster 1913 Edition


Out

Out

(out)
,
adv.
[OE.
out
,
ut
,
oute
,
ute
, AS.
ūt
, and
ūte
,
ūtan
, fr.
ūt
; akin to D.
uit
, OS.
ūt
, G.
aus
, OHG.
ūz
, Icel.
ūt
, Sw.
ut
, Dan.
ud
, Goth.
ut
, Skr.
ud
. √198. Cf.
About
,
But
,
p
rep.
,
Carouse
,
Utter
,
Adj.
]
In its original and strict sense, out means from the interior of something; beyond the limits or boundary of somethings; in a position or relation which is exterior to something; – opposed to
in
or
into
. The something may be expressed after of, from, etc. (see
Out of
, below); or, if not expressed, it is implied;
as, he is
out
; or, he is
out of
the house, office, business, etc.; he came
out
; or, he came
out from
the ship, meeting, sect, party, etc.
Out is used in a variety of applications, as: –
1.
Away; abroad; off; from home, or from a certain, or a usual, place; not in; not in a particular, or a usual, place;
as, the proprietor is
out
, his team was taken
out
. Opposite of
in
.
“My shoulder blade is out.”
Shak.
He hath been
out
(of the country) nine years.
Shakespeare
2.
Beyond the limits of concealment, confinement, privacy, constraint, etc., actual or figurative; hence, not in concealment, constraint, etc., in, or into, a state of freedom, openness, disclosure, publicity, etc.; a matter of public knowledge;
as, the sun shines
out
; he laughed
out
, to be
out
at the elbows; the secret has leaked
out
, or is
out
; the disease broke
out
on his face; the book is
out
.
Leaves are
out
and perfect in a month.
Bacon.
She has not been
out
[in general society] very long.
H. James.
3.
Beyond the limit of existence, continuance, or supply; to the end; completely; hence, in, or into, a condition of extinction, exhaustion, completion;
as, the fuel, or the fire, has burned
out
; that style is on the way
out
.
“Hear me out.”
Dryden.
Deceitful men shall not live
out
half their days.
Ps. iv. 23.
When the butt is
out
, we will drink water.
Shakespeare
4.
Beyond possession, control, or occupation; hence, in, or into, a state of want, loss, or deprivation; – used of office, business, property, knowledge, etc.;
as, the Democrats went
out
and the Whigs came in; he put his money
out
at interest.
“Land that is out at rack rent.”
Locke.
“He was out fifty pounds.”
Bp. Fell.
I have forgot my part, and I am
out
.
Shakespeare
5.
Beyond the bounds of what is true, reasonable, correct, proper, common, etc.; in error or mistake; in a wrong or incorrect position or opinion; in a state of disagreement, opposition, etc.; in an inharmonious relation.
“Lancelot and I are out.”
Shak.
Wicked men are strangely
out
in the calculating of their own interest.
South.
Very seldom
out
, in these his guesses.
Addison.
6.
Not in the position to score in playing a game; not in the state or turn of the play for counting or gaining scores.
Out is largely used in composition as a prefix, with the same significations that it has as a separate word; as outbound, outbreak, outbuilding, outcome, outdo, outdoor, outfield. See also the first Note under
Over
,
adv.
Day in, day out
,
from the beginning to the limit of each of several days; day by day; every day.
Out at
,
Out in
,
Out on
, etc.
,
elliptical phrases, that to which out refers as a source, origin, etc., being omitted;
as,
out
(of the house and)
at
the barn;
out
(of the house, road, fields, etc., and)
in
the woods
.


Three fishers went sailing
out into
the west,
Out into
the west, as the sun went down.
C. Kingsley.


In these lines after out may be understood, “of the harbor,” “from the shore,” “of sight,” or some similar phrase. The complete construction is seen in the saying: “Out of the frying pan into the fire.”


Out from
,
a construction similar to
out of
(below). See
Of
and
From
.
Out of
,
a phrase which may be considered either as composed of an adverb and a preposition, each having its appropriate office in the sentence, or as a compound preposition. Considered as a preposition, it denotes, with verbs of movement or action, from the interior of; beyond the limit: from; hence, origin, source, motive, departure, separation, loss, etc.; – opposed to
in
or
into
; also with verbs of being, the state of being derived, removed, or separated from. Examples may be found in the phrases below, and also under Vocabulary words; as, out of breath; out of countenance.
Out of cess
,
beyond measure, excessively.
Shak.
Out of character
,
unbecoming; improper.
Out of conceit with
,
not pleased with. See under
Conceit
.
Out of date
,
not timely; unfashionable; antiquated.
Out of door
,
Out of doors
,
beyond the doors; from the house; not inside a building; in, or into, the open air; hence, figuratively, shut out; dismissed. See under
Door
, also,
Out-of-door
,
Outdoor
,
Outdoors
, in the Vocabulary.
“He ’s quality, and the question's out of door,”
Dryden.
Out of favor
,
disliked; under displeasure.
Out of frame
,
not in correct order or condition; irregular; disarranged.
Latimer.
Out of hand
,
immediately; without delay or preparation; without hesitation or debate;
as, to dismiss a suggestion
out of hand
.
“Ananias . . . fell down and died out of hand.”
Latimer.
Out of harm's way
,
beyond the danger limit; in a safe place.
Out of joint
,
not in proper connection or adjustment; unhinged; disordered.
“The time is out of joint.”
Shak.
Out of mind
,
not in mind; forgotten; also, beyond the limit of memory;
as, time
out of mind
.
Out of one's head
,
beyond commanding one's mental powers; in a wandering state mentally; delirious.
[Colloq.]
Out of one's time
,
beyond one's period of minority or apprenticeship.
Out of order
,
not in proper order; disarranged; in confusion.
Out of place
,
not in the usual or proper place; hence, not proper or becoming.
Out of pocket
,
in a condition of having expended or lost more money than one has received.
Out of print
,
not in market, the edition printed being exhausted; – said of books, pamphlets, etc.
Out of the question
,
beyond the limits or range of consideration; impossible to be favorably considered.
Out of reach
,
beyond one's reach; inaccessible.
Out of season
,
not in a proper season or time; untimely; inopportune.
Out of sorts
,
wanting certain things; unsatisfied; unwell; unhappy; cross. See under
Sort
,
Noun.
Out of temper
,
not in good temper; irritated; angry.
Out of time
,
not in proper time; too soon, or too late.
Out of time
,
not in harmony; discordant; hence, not in an agreeing temper; fretful.
Out of twist
,
Out of winding
, or
Out of wind
,
not in warped condition; perfectly plain and smooth; – said of surfaces.
Out of use
,
not in use; unfashionable; obsolete.
Out of the way
.
(a)
On one side; hard to reach or find; secluded.
(b)
Improper; unusual; wrong.
Out of the woods
,
not in a place, or state, of obscurity or doubt; free from difficulty or perils; safe.
[Colloq.]
Out to out
,
from one extreme limit to another, including the whole length, breadth, or thickness; – applied to measurements.
Out West
, in or towards, the West; specifically, in some Western State or Territory.
[U. S.]
To come out
,
To cut out
,
To fall out
, etc.
See under
Come
,
Cut
,
Fall
, etc.
To make out
See
to make out
under
make
,
Verb.
T.
and
Verb.
I.
.
To put out of the way
,
to kill; to destroy.
Week in, week out
.
See
Day in, day out
(above).

Out

(out)
,
Noun.
1.
One who, or that which, is out; especially, one who is out of office; – generally in the plural.
2.
A place or space outside of something; a nook or corner; an angle projecting outward; an open space; – chiefly used in the phrase ins and outs;
as, the
ins and outs
of a question
. See under
In
.
3.
(Print.)
A word or words omitted by the compositor in setting up copy; an omission.
To make an out
(Print.)
,
(a)
to omit something, in setting or correcting type, which was in the copy.
(b)
(Baseball)
to be put out in one's turn at bat, such as to
strike out
, to
ground out
, or to
fly out
.

Out

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To cause to be out; to eject; to expel.
A king
outed
from his country.
Selden.
The French have been
outed
of their holds.
Heylin.
4.
To give out; to dispose of; to sell.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Out

,
Verb.
I.
To come or go out; to get out or away; to become public.
“Truth will out.”
Shak.

Out

,
int
erj.
Expressing impatience, anger, a desire to be rid of; – with the force of command; go out; begone; away; off.
Out
, idle words, servants to shallow fools!
Shakespeare
Out upon!
or
Out on!
equivalent to “shame upon!” “away with!”
as,
out upon
you!

Webster 1828 Edition


Out

OUT

,
adv.
1.
Without; on the outside; not within; on the exterior or beyond the limits of any inclosed place or given line; opposed to in or within; as, to go out and come in; to rush out.
2.
Abroad; not at home. The master of the house is out; a colloquial phrase for gone out.
3.
In a state of disclosure or discovery. The secret is out, that is, has come out, is disclosed. We shall find out the rogue.
4.
Not concealed.
When these are gone, the woman will be out.
5.
In a state of extinction. The candle or the fire is out.
6.
In a state of being exhausted. The wine is out.
7.
In a state of destitution. We are out of bread corn.
8.
Not in office or employment. I care not who is in or who is out. He is out of business.
9.
Abroad or from home, in a party, at church, in a parade, &c. He was not out today. The militia companies are out. The man was out in a frolic last night.
10.
To the end.
Hear me out.
11.
Loudly; without restraint; as, to laugh out.
12.
Not in the hands of the owner. The land is out upon a lease.
13.
In an error.
As a musician that will always play, and yet is always out at the same note.
14.
At a loss; in a puzzle.
I have forgot my part, and I am out.
15.
Uncovered; with clothes torn; as, to be out at the knees or elbows.
16.
Away, so as to consume; as, to sleep out the best time in the morning.
17.
Deficient; having expended. He was out of pocket. He was out fifty pounds.
18.
It is used as an exclamation with the force of command, away; begone; as, out with the dog.
Out upon you, out upon it, expressions of dislike or contempt.
Out is much used as a modifier of verbs; as, to come out, to go out, to lead out, to run out, to leak out, to creep out, to flow out, to pass out, to look out, to burn out, to cut out, to saw out, to grow out, to spin out, to write out, to boil out, to beat out, &c. bearing the sense of issuing, extending, drawing from, separating, bringing to open view, or in short, the passing of a limit that incloses or restrains; or bearing the metaphorical sense of vanishing, coming to an end.
Out of. In this connection, out may be considered as adverb, and of as a preposition.
1.
Proceeding from; as produce. Plants grow out of the earth. He paid me out of his own funds.
Keep thy heart with all diligence, for out of it are the issues of life. Prov. 4.
Out of the same mouth proceedeth blessing and cursing. James 3.
2.
From or proceeding from a place, or the interior of a place; as, to take any thing out of the house. Mark 13.
3.
Beyond; as out of the power of fortune.
They were astonished out of measure. Mark 10.
4.
From, noting taking or derivation.
To whom he expounded and testified the kingdom of God, persuading them concerning Jesus, both out of the law of Moses, and out of the prophets. Acts 28.
5.
Not in, noting extraordinary exertion.
Be instant in season, out of season. 2Tim. 4.
6.
Not in, noting exclusion, dismission, departure, absence or dereliction; as out of favor; out of use; out of place; out of fashion.
7.
Not in, noting unfitness or impropriety. He is witty out of season. The seed was sown out of season.
8.
Not within, noting extraordinary delay; as, a ship is out of time.
9.
Not within; abroad; as out of the door or house.
10.
From, noting copy from an original; as, to cite or copy out of Horace.
11.
From, noting rescue or liberation; as, to be delivered out of afflictions.
Christianity recovered the law of nature out of all those errors.
12.
Not in, noting deviation, exorbitance or irregularity. This is out of all method; out of all rule. He goes out of his way to find cause of censure. He is out of order.
13.
From, noting dereliction or departure. He will not be flattered or frightened out of his duty. He attempted to laugh men out of virtue.
14.
From, noting loss or change of state. The mouth is out of taste; the instrument is out of tune.
15.
Not according to, noting deviation; as, he acts or speaks out of character.
16.
Beyond; not within the limits of; as, to be out of hearing, out of sight, out of reach. Time out of mind, is time beyond the reach of memory.
17.
Noting loss or exhaustion, as, to be out of breath.
18.
Noting loss; as out of hope.
19.
By means of.
Out of that will I cause those of Cyprus to mutiny.
20.
In consequence of, noting the motive, source or reason.
What they do not grant out of the generosity of their nature, they may grant out of mere impatience.
So we say, a thing is done out of envy, spite or ambition.
Out of hand, immediately, as that is easily used which is ready in the hand.
Gather we our forces out of hand.
Out of print, denotes that a book is not in market, or to be purchased; the copies printed having been all sold.

OUT

, v.t To eject; to expel; to deprive by expulsion.
The French having been outed of their holds.
In composition, out signifies beyond, more, ejection or extension.
For the participles of the following compounds, see the simple verbs.

Definition 2021


out

out

See also: oût and out-

English

Alternative forms

Adverb

out (not comparable)

  1. Away from home or one's usual place, or not indoors.
    Let's eat out tonight
    Leave a message with my secretary if I'm out when you call.
  2. (of the sun, moon, stars, etc.) Visible in the sky; not covered by clouds, fog, etc.
    The moon is out.
    The sun came out after the rain, and we saw a rainbow.
  3. Away from; at a distance.
    Keep out!
  4. Away from the inside or the centre.
    The magician pulled the rabbit out of the hat.
  5. Into a state of non-operation; into non-existence.
    Switch the lights out.
    Put the fire out.
  6. To the end; completely.
    I hadn't finished. Hear me out.
    • Bible, Psalms iv. 23:
      Deceitful men shall not live out half their days.
  7. Used to intensify or emphasize.
    The place was all decked out for the holidays.
  8. (cricket, baseball) Of a player, disqualified from playing further by some action of a member of the opposing team (such as being stumped in cricket).
  9. (procedure word, military) A radio procedure word meaning that the station is finished with its transmission and does not expect a response.
    Destruction. Two T-72s destroyed. Three foot mobiles down. Out.

Synonyms

  • (not at home): away

Antonyms

  • (not at home): in

Derived terms

Translations

Preposition

out

  1. (nonstandard, contraction of out of) Away from the inside.
    He threw it out the door.
  2. (colloquial) outside
    It's raining out.
    It's cold out.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (away from the inside): in

Translations

Noun

out (plural outs)

  1. A means of exit, escape, reprieve, etc.
    They wrote the law to give those organizations an out.
  2. (baseball) A state in which a member of the batting team is removed from play due to the application of various rules of the game such as striking out, hitting a fly ball which is caught by the fielding team before bouncing, etc.
  3. (cricket) A dismissal; a state in which a member of the batting team finishes his turn at bat, due to the application of various rules of the game such as hit wicket, wherein the bowler has hit the batsman's wicket with the ball.
  4. (poker) A card which can make a hand a winner.
  5. (dated) A trip out; an outing.
    • Charles Dickens, Bleak House
      "Us London lawyers don't often get an out; and when we do, we like to make the most of it, you know."
  6. (chiefly in the plural) One who, or that which, is out; especially, one who is out of office.
  7. A place or space outside of something; a nook or corner; an angle projecting outward; an open space.
  8. (printing, dated) A word or words omitted by the compositor in setting up copy; an omission.

Translations

Verb

out (third-person singular simple present outs, present participle outing, simple past and past participle outed)

  1. (transitive) To eject; to expel.
    • Selden
      a king outed from his country
    • Heylin
      The French have been outed of their holds.
  2. (transitive) To reveal (a person) to be gay, bisexual, or transgender.
  3. (transitive) To reveal (a person or organization) as having a certain secret, such as a being a secret agent or undercover detective.
  4. (transitive) To reveal (a secret).
    A Brazilian company outed the new mobile phone design.
  5. (intransitive, archaic) To come or go out; to get out or away; to become public.
    • Shakespeare
      Truth will out.
  6. To become apparent.
    • 2016 September 28, Tom English, “Celtic 3–3 Manchester City”, in (Please provide the title of the work), BBC Sport:
      In those opening minutes City looked like a team that were not ready for Celtic's intensity. They looked a bit shocked to be involved in a fight. Class will out, though.

Translations

Adjective

out (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Of a young lady, having entered society and available to be courted.
    • 1814, Austen, Jane, Mansfield Park, volume one, chapter V, Thomas Egerton:
      "Pray, is she out, or is she not? I am puzzled. She dined at the Parsonage, with the rest of you, which seemed like being out; and yet she says so little, that I can hardly suppose she is."
  2. released, available for purchase, download or other use
    Did you hear? Their newest CD is out!
    • 2009, Roger Stahl, Militainment, Inc.: War, Media, and Popular Culture (page 96)
      The game was commercially released on Xbox and PC in 2005 as an installment of the Close Combat series, which had been out since 1996.
  3. (cricket, baseball) Of a batter or batsman, having caused an out called on himself while batting under various rules of the game.
  4. Openly acknowledging that one is gay or transgender.
    It's no big deal to be out in the entertainment business.
    • 2011, Allan Bérubé, My Desire for History: Essays in Gay, Community, and Labor History
      I had not come out yet and he was out but wasn't; quite ungay, I would say, and yet gay.

Usage notes

  • In cricket, the specific cause or rule under which a batsman is out appears after the word "out", eg, "out hit the ball twice".
  • In baseball, the cause is expressed as a verb with adverbial "out", eg, "he grounded out".

Synonyms

  • (openly acknowledging one's homosexuality): openly gay

Antonyms

  • (disqualified from playing): in, safe
  • (openly acknowledging one's homosexuality): closeted

Translations

Derived terms

Related terms

References

  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Bounded landmarks", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: if · there · more · #54: out · into · up · your

German

Etymology

From English out

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aʊ̯t/, [ʔaʊ̯tʰ]
  • Rhymes: -aʊ̯t

Adjective

out (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) out of fashion

Declension

Synonyms

Antonyms


Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French août (August)

Noun

out

  1. August

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch ald, from Proto-Germanic *aldaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /out/

Adjective

out (stem oud-, comparative ouder, superlative outst)

  1. old

Descendants


Spanish

Noun

out m (plural outs)

  1. (baseball) out