Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Whole

Whole

,
Adj.
[OE.
hole
,
hol
,
hal
,
hool
, AS.
hāl
well, sound, healthy; akin to OFries. & OS.
h[GREEK]l
, D.
heel
, G.
heil
, Icel.
heill
, Sw.
hel
whole, Dan.
heel
, Goth.
hails
well, sound, OIr.
c[GREEK]l
augury. Cf.
Hale
,
Hail
to greet,
Heal
to cure,
Health
,
Holy
.]
1.
Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire;
as, the
whole
earth; the
whole
solar system; the
whole
army; the
whole
nation.
“On their whole host I flew unarmed.”
Milton.
The
whole
race of mankind.
Shakespeare
2.
Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimpaired; uninjured; integral;
as, a
whole
orange; the egg is
whole
; the vessel is
whole
.
My life is yet
whole
in me.
2 Sam. i. 9.
3.
Possessing, or being in a state of, heath and soundness; healthy; sound; well.
[She] findeth there her friends
hole
and sound.
Chaucer.
They that be
whole
need not a physician.
Matt. ix. 12.
When Sir Lancelot’s deadly hurt was
whole
.
Tennyson.
Whole blood
.
(Law of Descent)
See under
Blood
,
Noun.
, 2.
Whole note
(Mus.)
,
the note which represents a note of longest duration in common use; a semibreve.
Whole number
(Math.)
,
a number which is not a fraction or mixed number; an integer.
Whole snipe
(Zool.)
,
the common snipe, as distinguished from the smaller jacksnipe.
[Prov. Eng.]
Syn. – All; total; complete; entire; integral; undivided; uninjured; unimpaired; unbroken; healthy.
Whole
,
Total
,
Entire
,
Complete
. When we use the word whole, we refer to a thing as made up of parts, none of which are wanting;
as, a
whole
week; a
whole
year; the
whole
creation
. When we use the word total, we have reference to all as taken together, and forming a single totality;
as, the
total
amount
; the total income. When we speak of a thing as entire, we have no reference to parts at all, but regard the thing as an integer, i. e., continuous or unbroken;
as, an
entire
year
; entire prosperity. When we speak of a thing as complete, there is reference to some progress which results in a filling out to some end or object, or a perfected state with no deficiency;
as,
complete
success; a
complete
victory
.
All the
whole
army stood agazed on him.
Shakespeare
One
entire
and perfect chrysolite.
Shakespeare
Lest
total
darkness should by night regain
Her old possession, and extinguish life.
Milton.
So absolute she seems,
And in herself
complete
.
Milton.

Whole

,
Noun.
1.
The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself.
This not the
whole
of life to live,
Nor all of death to die.
J. Montgomery.
2.
A regular combination of parts; a system.
Parts answering parts shall slide into a
whole
.
Pope.
Committee of the whole
.
See under
Committee
.
Upon the whole
,
considering all things; taking everything into account; in view of all the circumstances or conditions.
Syn. – Totality; total; amount; aggregate; gross.

Webster 1828 Edition


Whole

WHOLE

,
Adj.
Hole. [G., Gr. This seems to be connected with heal, hale. Of this the derivative wholesome, is evidence.]
1.
All; total; containing the total amount or number, or the entire thing; as the whole earth; the whole world; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation.
2.
Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; as a whole orange; the egg is whole; the vessel is whole.
3.
Unimpaired; unbroken; uninjured.
My life is yet whole in me. 2 Samuel 1.
4.
Sound; not hurt or sick.
They that are whole need not a physician. Matthew 9.
5.
Restored to health and soundness; sound; well.
Thy faith hath made thee whole. Mark 5.
His hand was restored whole. Mark 3.

WHOLE

,
Noun.
1.
The entire thing; the entire or total assemblage of parts. The whole of religion is contained in the short precept, Love God with all your heart, and your neighbor as yourself.
Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. Ecclesiastes 12.
2.
A system; a regular combination of parts.

Definition 2022


whole

whole

English

Alternative forms

Adjective

whole (comparative wholer or more whole, superlative wholest or most whole)

  1. Entire.
    I ate a whole fish.
    • 1661, John Fell, The Life of the most learned, reverend and pious Dr. H. Hammond
      During the whole time of his abode in the university he generally spent thirteen hours of the day in study; by which assiduity besides an exact dispatch of the whole course of philosophy, he read over in a manner all classic authors that are extant []
    • 1893, Walter Besant, The Ivory Gate, Prologue:
      Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging. [] He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “[…] She takes the whole thing with desperate seriousness. But the others are all easy and jovial—thinking about the good fare that is soon to be eaten, about the hired fly, about anything.”
    • 2013 June 29, High and wet”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 28:
      Floods in northern India, mostly in the small state of Uttarakhand, have wrought disaster on an enormous scale. The early, intense onset of the monsoon on June 14th swelled rivers, washing away roads, bridges, hotels and even whole villages.
  2. Sound, uninjured, healthy.
    He is of whole mind, but the same cannot be said about his physical state.
    • 1939, Alfred Edward Housman, Additional Poems, X, lines 5-6
      Here, with one balm for many fevers found, / Whole of an ancient evil, I sleep sound.
  3. (of food) From which none of its constituents has been removed.
    whole wheat; whole milk

Antonyms

  • ground (as in ground seed) (1)

Translations

Adverb

whole (comparative more whole, superlative most whole)

  1. (colloquial) In entirety; entirely; wholly.
    I ate a fish whole!

Translations

Noun

whole (plural wholes)

  1. Something complete, without any parts missing.
    This variety of fascinating details didn't fall together into an enjoyable, coherent whole.
  2. An entirety.

Meronyms

Translations

Derived terms

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: p · Lord · de · #189: whole · find · got · let