Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Weave

Weave

(wēv)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp.
Wove
(wōv)
;
p. p.
Woven
(wōv′’n)
,
Wove
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Weaving
. The regular
imp. & p. p.
Weaved
(wēvd)
, is rarely used.]
[OE.
weven
, AS.
wefan
; akin to D.
weven
, G.
weben
, OHG.
weban
, Icel.
vefa
, Sw.
väfva
, Dan.
væve
, Gr.
ὑφαίνειν
, v.,
ὕφοσ
web, Skr.
ūrṇavābhi
spider, lit., wool weaver. Cf.
Waper
,
Waffle
,
Web
,
Weevil
,
Weft
,
Woof
.]
1.
To unite, as threads of any kind, in such a manner as to form a texture; to entwine or interlace into a fabric;
as, to
weave
wool, silk, etc
.; hence, to unite by close connection or intermixture; to unite intimately.
This
weaves
itself, perforce, into my business.
Shakespeare
That in their green shops
weave
the smooth-haired silk
To deck her sons.
Milton.
And for these words, thus
woven
into song.
Byron.
2.
To form, as cloth, by interlacing threads; to compose, as a texture of any kind, by putting together textile materials;
as, to
weave
broadcloth; to weave a carpet
; hence, to form into a fabric; to compose; to fabricate;
as, to
weave
the plot of a story
.
When she
weaved
the sleided silk.
Shakespeare
Her starry wreaths the virgin jasmin
weaves
.
Ld. Lytton.

Weave

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To practice weaving; to work with a loom.
2.
To become woven or interwoven.

Weave

,
Noun.
A particular method or pattern of weaving;
as, the cassimere
weave
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Weave

WEAVE

,
Verb.
T.
pret. wove; pp. woven, wove. The regular form, weaved, is rarely or never used. [G., Gr.]
1.
To unite threads of any kind in such a manner as to form cloth. This is done by crossing the threads by means of a shuttle. The modes of weaving, and the kinds of texture, are various. The threads first laid in length are called the warp; those which cross them in the direction of the breadth, are called the weft or woof.
2.
To unite any thing flexible; as, to weave twigs.
3.
To unite by intermixture or close connection; as a form of religion woven into the civil government.
4.
To interpose; to insert.
This weaves itself perforce into my business.

WEAVE

,
Verb.
I.
To practice weaving; to work with a loom.

Definition 2022


weave

weave

English

Verb

weave (third-person singular simple present weaves, present participle weaving, simple past wove or weaved, past participle woven or weaved)

  1. To form something by passing lengths or strands of material over and under one another.
    This loom weaves yarn into sweaters.
  2. To spin a cocoon or a web.
    Spiders weave beautiful but deadly webs.
  3. To unite by close connection or intermixture.
    • Shakespeare
      This weaves itself, perforce, into my business.
    • Byron
      these words, thus woven into song
  4. To compose creatively and intricately; to fabricate.
    to weave the plot of a story
Related terms
Translations

Noun

weave (plural weaves)

  1. A type or way of weaving.
    That rug has a very tight weave.
  2. Human or artificial hair worn to alter one's appearance, either to supplement or to cover the natural hair.
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from Old Norse veifa ‘move around, wave’, related to Latin vibrare.

Verb

weave (third-person singular simple present weaves, present participle weaving, simple past and past participle weaved)

  1. (intransitive) To move by turning and twisting.
    The drunk weaved into another bar.
    • 2011 January 15, Saj Chowdhury, “Man City 4 - 3 Wolves”, in BBC:
      Tevez picked up a throw-in from the right, tip-toed his way into the area and weaved past three Wolves challenges before slotting in to display why, of all City's multi-million pound buys, he remains their most important player.
  2. (transitive) To make (a path or way) by winding in and out or from side to side.
    The ambulance weaved its way through the heavy traffic.
    • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
      Weave a circle round him thrice.
Translations

References

  • weave in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • weave in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913