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Webster 1913 Edition


Trance

Trance

,
Noun.
[F.
transe
fright, in OF. also, trance or swoon, fr.
transir
to chill, benumb, to be chilled, to shiver, OF. also, to die, L.
transire
to pass over, go over, pass away, cease;
trans
across, over +
ire
to go; cf. L.
transitus
a passing over. See
Issue
, and cf.
Transit
.]
1.
A tedious journey.
[Prov. Eng.]
Halliwell.
2.
A state in which the soul seems to have passed out of the body into another state of being, or to be rapt into visions; an ecstasy.
And he became very hungry, and would have eaten; but while they made ready, he fell into a
trance
.
Acts. x. 10.
My soul was ravished quite as in a
trance
.
Spenser.
3.
(Med.)
A condition, often simulating death, in which there is a total suspension of the power of voluntary movement, with abolition of all evidences of mental activity and the reduction to a minimum of all the vital functions so that the patient lies still and apparently unconscious of surrounding objects, while the pulsation of the heart and the breathing, although still present, are almost or altogether imperceptible.
He fell down in a
trance
.
Chaucer.

Trance

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Tranced
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Trancing
.]
1.
To entrance.
And three I left him
tranced
.
Shakespeare
2.
To pass over or across; to traverse.
[Poetic]
Trance
the world over.
Beau. & Fl.
When thickest dark did
trance
the sky.
Tennyson.

Trance

,
Verb.
I.
To pass; to travel.
[Obs.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Trance

TR`ANCE

,
Noun.
tr`ans. [L. transitus, a passing over; transeo, to pass over; trans and eo.] An ecstasy; a state in which the soul seems to have passed out of the body into celestial regions, or to be rapt into visions.
My soul was ravish'd quite as in a trance.
While they made ready, he fell into a trance, and saw heaven opened. Acts 10.

Definition 2022


Trance

Trance

See also: trance and trancé

German

Noun

Trance f (genitive Trance, plural Trancen)

  1. trance

trance

trance

See also: Trance and trancé

English

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /træns/
  • Rhymes: -æns

Noun

trance (plural trances)

  1. A dazed or unconscious condition.
  2. (consciousness) A state of concentration, awareness and/or focus that filters information and experience; e.g. meditation, possession, etc.
    • Bible, Acts x. 10
      And he became very hungry, and would have eaten; but while they made ready, he fell into a trance.
    • Spenser
      My soul was ravished quite as in a trance.
  3. (psychology) A state of low response to stimulus and diminished, narrow attention.
  4. (psychology) The previous state induced by hypnosis.
  5. (uncountable, music) Trance music, a genre of electronic dance music.
  6. (obsolete) A tedious journey.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Descendants
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Verb

trance (third-person singular simple present trances, present participle trancing, simple past and past participle tranced)

  1. To entrance.
    • Shakespeare
      And there I left him tranced.
  2. (obsolete) To pass over or across; to traverse.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Trance the world over.
    • Tennyson
      When thickest dark did trance the sky.
  3. (obsolete) To pass; to travel.

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Borrowing from English trance.

Pronunciation

Noun

trance f (uncountable)

  1. trance (music genre)

Anagrams


Italian

Etymology

Borrowing from English trance.

Noun

trance f (invariable)

  1. trance (music genre)

Anagrams


Polish

Etymology

Borrowing from English trance.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɛ̃s/

Noun

trance m inan

  1. trance (music genre)
Declension

References

  • Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, M. Bańko, PWN 2003, ISBN 978-83-01-14455-5

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowing from English trance.

Noun

trance m (uncountable)

  1. (music) trance (a genre of electronic dance music)

Etymology 2

Verb

trance

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of trançar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of trançar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of trançar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of trançar

Etymology 3

Noun

trance m (plural trances)

  1. Obsolete form of transe.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowing from English trance.

Noun

trance m (plural trances)

  1. trance