Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Show

Show

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp.
Showed
;
p. p.
Shown
or
Showed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Showing
.
It is sometimes written
shew
,
shewed
,
shewn
,
shewing
.
]
[OE.
schowen
,
shewen
,
schewen
,
shawen
, AS.
sceáwian
, to look, see, view; akin to OS.
scaw[GREEK]n
, OFries.
skawia
, D.
schouwen
, OHG.
scouw[GREEK]n
, G.
schauen
, Dan.
skue
, Sw.
sk[GREEK]da
, Icel.
sko[GREEK]a
, Goth. us
skawjan
to waken,
skuggwa
a mirror, Icel.
skuggy
shade, shadow, L.
cavere
to be on one’s guard, Gr. [GREEK][GREEK][GREEK] to mark, perceive, hear, Skr.
kavi
wise. Cf.
Caution
,
Scavenger
,
Sheen
.]
1.
To exhibit or present to view; to place in sight; to display; – the thing exhibited being the object, and often with an indirect object denoting the person or thing seeing or beholding;
as, to
show
a house;
show
your colors; shopkeepers
show
customers goods (show goods to customers).
Go thy way,
shew
thyself to the priest.
Matt. viii. 4.
Nor want we skill or art from whence to raise
Magnificence; and what can heaven
show
more?
Milton.
2.
To exhibit to the mental view; to tell; to disclose; to reveal; to make known;
as, to
show
one's designs
.
Shew
them the way wherein they must walk.
Ex. xviii. 20.
If it please my father to do thee evil, then I will
shew
it thee, and send thee away.
1 Sam. xx. 13.
3.
Specifically, to make known the way to (a person); hence, to direct; to guide; to asher; to conduct;
as, to
show
a person into a parlor; to
show
one to the door
.
4.
To make apparent or clear, as by evidence, testimony, or reasoning; to prove; to explain; also, to manifest; to evince;
as, to
show
the truth of a statement; to
show
the causes of an event
.
I 'll
show
my duty by my timely care.
Dryden.
5.
To bestow; to confer; to afford;
as, to
show
favor
.
Shewing
mercy unto thousands of them that love me.
Ex. xx. 6.
To show forth
,
to manifest; to publish; to proclaim.
To show his paces
,
to exhibit the gait, speed, or the like; – said especially of a horse.
To show off
,
to exhibit ostentatiously.
To show up
,
to expose.
[Colloq.]

Show

,
Verb.
I.
[Written also
shew
.]
1.
To exhibit or manifest one's self or itself; to appear; to look; to be in appearance; to seem.
Just such she
shows
before a rising storm.
Dryden.
All round a hedge upshoots, and
shows

At distance like a little wood.
Tennyson.
2.
To have a certain appearance, as well or ill, fit or unfit; to become or suit; to appear.
My lord of York, it better
showed
with you.
Shakespeare
To show off
,
to make a show; to display one's self.

Show

,
Noun.
[Formerly written also
shew
.]
1.
The act of showing, or bringing to view; exposure to sight; exhibition.
2.
That which os shown, or brought to view; that which is arranged to be seen; a spectacle; an exhibition;
as, a traveling
show
; a cattle
show
.
As for triumphs, masks, feasts, and such
shows
.
Bacon.
3.
Proud or ostentatious display; parade; pomp.
I envy none their pageantry and
show
.
Young.
4.
Semblance; likeness; appearance.
He through the midst unmarked,
In
show
plebeian angel militant
Of lowest order, passed.
Milton.
5.
False semblance; deceitful appearance; pretense.
Beware of the scribes, . . . which devour widows' houses, and for a
shew
make long prayers.
Luke xx. 46. 47.
6.
(Med.)
A discharge, from the vagina, of mucus streaked with blood, occuring a short time before labor.
7.
(Mining)
A pale blue flame, at the top of a candle flame, indicating the presence of fire damp.
Raymond.
Show bill
,
a broad sheet containing an advertisement in large letters.
Show box
,
a box xontaining some object of curiosity carried round as a show.
Show card
,
an advertising placard; also, a card for displaying samples.
Show case
,
a gla[GREEK]ed case, box, or cabinet for displaying and protecting shopkeepers' wares, articles on exhibition in museums, etc.
Show glass
,
a glass which displays objects; a mirror.
Show of hands
,
a raising of hands to indicate judgment; as, the vote was taken by a show of hands.
Show stone
,
a piece of glass or crystal supposed to have the property of exhibiting images of persons or things not present, indicating in that way future events.

Webster 1828 Edition


Show

SHOW

,
Verb.
T.
pret. showed; pp. shown or showed. It is sometimes written shew, shewed, shewn. [If the radical letter lost was a labial, show coincides with the Gr.]
1. To exhibit or present to the view of others.
Go thy way, show thyself to the priest. Matt. 8.
2. To afford to the eye or to notice; to contain in a visible form.
Nor want we skill o rart, from whence to raise
Magnificence; and what can heaven show more? Milton.
3. To make or enable to see.
4. To make or enable to perceive.
5. To make to know; to cause to understand; to make known; to teach or inform.
Know, I am sent
To show thee what shall come in future days. Milton.
6. To prove; to manifest.
I'll show my duty by my timely care. Dryden.
7. T oinform; to teach; with of.
The time cometh when I shall no more speak to you in proverbs, but I shall show you plainly of the Father. John 16.
8. To point out, as a guide.
Thou shalt show them th eway in which they must walk. Ex. 18.
9. To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor or mercy on any person.
10. To prove by evidence, testimony or authentic registers or documents.
They could not show their father's house. Ezra 2.
11. To disclose; to make known.
I durst not show mine opinion. Job. 32.
12. To discover; to explain; as, to show a dream or interpretation.

Definition 2022


Show

Show

See also: show

German

Noun

Show f (genitive Show, plural Shows)

  1. show, spectacle

show

show

See also: Show

English

Alternative forms

Verb

show (third-person singular simple present shows, present participle showing, simple past showed, past participle shown or showed)

  1. (transitive) To display, to have somebody see (something).
    The car's dull finish showed years of neglect.
    All he had to show for four years of attendance at college was a framed piece of paper.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Not unnaturally, Auntie took this communication in bad part. Thus outraged, she showed herself to be a bold as well as a furious virago. Next day she found her way to their lodgings and tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head.
  2. (transitive) To bestow; to confer.
    to show mercy; to show favour
  3. (transitive) To indicate (a fact) to be true; to demonstrate.
    • 2012 March-April, John T. Jost, Social Justice: Is It in Our Nature (and Our Future)?”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 162:
      He draws eclectically on studies of baboons, descriptive anthropological accounts of hunter-gatherer societies and, in a few cases, the fossil record. With this biological framework in place, Corning endeavors to show that the capitalist system as currently practiced in the United States and elsewhere is manifestly unfair.
  4. (transitive) To guide or escort.
    Could you please show him on his way. He has overstayed his welcome.
  5. (intransitive) To be visible, to be seen.
    Your bald patch is starting to show.
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      Just such she shows before a rising storm.
    • Tennyson (1809-1892)
      All round a hedge upshoots, and shows / At distance like a little wood.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
  6. (intransitive, informal) To put in an appearance; show up.
    We waited for an hour, but they never showed.
  7. (intransitive, informal) To have an enlarged belly and thus be recognizable as pregnant.
  8. (intransitive, racing) To finish third, especially of horses or dogs.
    In the third race: Aces Up won, paying eight dollars; Blarney Stone placed, paying three dollars; and Cinnamon showed, paying five dollars.
  9. (obsolete) To have a certain appearance, such as well or ill, fit or unfit; to become or suit; to appear.

Usage notes

In the past, shew was used as a past tense form and shewed as a past participle of this verb; both forms are now archaic.

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Noun

show (plural shows)

  1. (countable) A play, dance, or other entertainment.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 4, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Then he commenced to talk, really talk. and inside of two flaps of a herring's fin he had me mesmerized, like Eben Holt's boy at the town hall show. He talked about the ills of humanity, and the glories of health and Nature and service and land knows what all.
  2. (countable) An exhibition of items.
    art show;  dog show
  3. (countable) A demonstration.
    show of force
  4. (countable) A broadcast program/programme.
    radio show;  television show
  5. (countable) A movie.
    Let's catch a show.
  6. (uncountable) Mere display or pomp with no substance.
    • Young
      I envy none their pageantry and show.
    The dog sounds ferocious but it's all show.
  7. A project or presentation.
    Let's get on with the show.   Let's get this show on the road.   They went on an international road show to sell the shares to investors.   It was Apple's usual dog and pony show.
  8. (baseball, with "the") The major leagues.
    He played AA ball for years, but never made it to the show.
  9. (mining, obsolete) A pale blue flame at the top of a candle flame, indicating the presence of firedamp.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
  10. (obsolete) Semblance; likeness; appearance.
    • Bible, Luke xx. 46. 47
      Beware of the scribes, [] which devour widows' houses, and for a shew make long prayers.
    • John Milton
      He through the midst unmarked, / In show plebeian angel militant / Of lowest order, passed.
  11. (medicine) A discharge, from the ****, of mucus streaked with blood, occurring a short time before labor.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: understand · fine · law · #432: show · terms · sort · town

Anagrams


Finnish

Noun

show

  1. show (entertainment)

Declension

Usage notes

In plural usually substituted with a synonym, as the word does not easily fit into any Finnish declension category.

Synonyms


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃo/

Noun

show m (plural shows)

  1. (Anglicism) show

Hungarian

Etymology

From English show. [1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃoː]
  • Homophone:
  • Hyphenation: show

Noun

show (plural show-k)

  1. show

Declension

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative show show-k
accusative show-t show-kat
dative show-nak show-knak
instrumental show-val show-kkal
causal-final show-ért show-kért
translative show-vá show-kká
terminative show-ig show-kig
essive-formal show-ként show-kként
essive-modal
inessive show-ban show-kban
superessive show-n show-kon
adessive show-nál show-knál
illative show-ba show-kba
sublative show-ra show-kra
allative show-hoz show-khoz
elative show-ból show-kból
delative show-ról show-król
ablative show-tól show-któl
Possessive forms of show
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. show-m show-im
2nd person sing. show-d show-id
3rd person sing. show-ja show-i
1st person plural show-nk show-ink
2nd person plural show-tok show-itok
3rd person plural show-juk show-ik

References

  1. Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowing from English show

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʂɔʋ/, /ʂɔu/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʋ, -ɔu

Noun

show n (definite singular showet, indefinite plural show, definite plural showa or showene)

  1. a show (play, concert, entertainment)

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowing from English show

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʂɔʋ/, /ʂɔu/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʋ, -ɔu

Noun

show n (definite singular showet, indefinite plural show, definite plural showa)

  1. a show (play, concert, entertainment)

Derived terms

References


Portuguese

Alternative forms

Etymology

Borrowing from English show.

Pronunciation

Noun

show m (plural shows)

  1. show (a entertainment performance event)
  2. (slang, often used in dar um show) the action of crying or yelling out loud in order to protest or complain about something, often in the context of a discussion or argument

Synonyms

Derived terms

Adjective

show (invariable, comparable)

  1. (Brazil, slang) amazing; awesome

Synonyms


Spanish

Etymology

From English.

Noun

show m (plural shows)

  1. show
  2. (informal) A scandal
  3. spectacle
  4. An exhibition motivated action or thing

Swedish

Etymology

From English.

Noun

show c

  1. show; a play, dance, or other entertainment.

Declension

Inflection of show 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative show showen shower showerna
Genitive shows showens showers showernas