Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Sin

Sin

,
adv.
, p
rep.
, & c
onj.
Old form of
Since
.
[Obs. or Prov. Eng. & Scot.]
Sin
that his lord was twenty year of age.
Chaucer.

Sin

,
Noun.
[OE.
sinne
, AS.
synn
,
syn
; akin to D.
zonde
, OS.
sundia
, OHG.
sunta
, G.
sünde
, Icel., Dan. & Sw.
synd
, L.
sons
,
sontis
, guilty, perhaps originally from the p. pr. of the verb signifying, to be, and meaning, the one who it is. Cf.
Authentic
,
Sooth
.]
1.
Transgression of the law of God; disobedience of the divine command; any violation of God’s will, either in purpose or conduct; moral deficiency in the character; iniquity;
as,
sins
of omission and
sins
of commission
.
Whosoever committeth
sin
is the servant of
sin
.
John viii. 34.
Sin
is the transgression of the law.
1 John iii. 4.
I think 't no
sin
.
To cozen him that would unjustly win.
Shakespeare
Enthralled
By
sin
to foul, exorbitant desires.
Milton.
2.
An offense, in general; a violation of propriety; a misdemeanor;
as, a
sin
against good manners
.
I grant that poetry's a crying
sin
.
Pope.
3.
A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin.
He hath made him to be
sin
for us, who knew no sin.
2 Cor. v. 21.
4.
An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.
[R.]
Thy ambition,
Thou scarlet
sin
, robbed this bewailing land
Of noble Buckingham.
Shakespeare
Sin is used in the formation of some compound words of obvious signification; as, sin-born; sin-bred, sin-oppressed, sin-polluted, and the like.
Actual sin
,
Canonical sins
,
Original sin
,
Venial sin
.
See under
Actual
,
Canonical
, etc.
Deadly sins
, or
Mortal sins
(R. C. Ch.)
,
willful and deliberate transgressions, which take away divine grace; – in distinction from vental sins. The seven deadly sins are pride, covetousness, lust, wrath, gluttony, envy, and sloth.
Sin eater
,
a man who (according to a former practice in England) for a small gratuity ate a piece of bread laid on the chest of a dead person, whereby he was supposed to have taken the sins of the dead person upon himself.
Sin offering
,
a sacrifice for sin; something offered as an expiation for sin.
Syn. – Iniquity; wickedness; wrong. See
Crime
.

Sin

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Sinned
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Sinning
.]
[OE.
sinnen
,
singen
,
sinegen
, AS.
syngian
. See
Sin
,
Noun.
]
1.
To depart voluntarily from the path of duty prescribed by God to man; to violate the divine law in any particular, by actual transgression or by the neglect or nonobservance of its injunctions; to violate any known rule of duty; – often followed by against.
Against thee, thee only, have I
sinned
.
Ps. li. 4.
All have
sinned
, and come short of the glory of God.
Rom. iii. 23.
2.
To violate human rights, law, or propriety; to commit an offense; to trespass; to transgress.
I am a man
More
sinned
against than
sinning
.
Shakespeare
Who but wishes to invert the laws
Of order,
sins
against the eternal cause.
Pope.

Webster 1828 Edition


Sin

SIN

, n.
1.
The voluntary departure of a moral agent from a known rule of rectitude or duty, prescribed by God; any voluntary transgression of the divine law, or violation of a divine command; a wicked act; iniquity. Sin is either a positive act in which a known divine law is violated, or it is the voluntary neglect to obey a positive divine command, or a rule of duty clearly implied in such command. Sin comprehends not action only, but neglect of known duty, all evil thoughts purposes, words and desires, whatever is contrary to God's commands or law. 1 John 3. Matt. 15. James 4. Sinner neither enjoy the pleasures of nor the peace of piety. Among divines, sin is original or actual. Actual sin, above defined, is the act of a moral agent in violating a known rule of duty. Original sin, as generally understood, is native depravity of heart to the divine will, that corruption of nature of deterioration of the moral character of man, which is supposed to be the effect of Adam's apostasy; and which manifests itself in moral agents by positive act of disobedience to the divine will, or by the voluntary neglect to comply with the express commands of God, which require that we should love God with all the heart and soul and strength and mind, and our neighbor as ourselves. This native depravity or alienation of affections from God and his law, is supposed to be what the apostle calls the carnal mind or mindedness, which is enmity against God, and is therefore denominated sin or sinfulness. Unpardonable sin, or blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, is supposed to be a malicious and obstinate rejection of Christ and the gospel plan of salvation, or a contemptuous resistance made to the influences and convictions of the Holy Spirit. Matt.12.
2.
A sin-offering; an offering made to atone for sin. He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin. 2 Cor 5.
3.
A man enormously wicked. [Not in use.]
4.
Sin differs from crime, not in nature, but in application. That which is a crime against society, is sin against God.

Definition 2022


Sín

Sín

See also: Appendix:Variations of "sin"

Irish

Proper noun

An tSín f (genitive na Síne)

  1. China

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
Sín Shín
after an, tSín
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Derived terms

Related terms

sín

sín

See also: Appendix:Variations of "sin"

Faroese

Pronoun

sín

  1. reflexive pronoun, 3rd person genitive

Declension

Reflexive pronouns - Afturbent fornavn
Singular (eintal), Plural (fleirtal) 3. m, f, n
Nominative (hvørfall)
Accusative (hvønnfall) seg
Dative (hvørjumfall) sær
Genitive (hvørsfall) sín

References

  • Höskuldur Thráinsson, Hjalmar P. Petersen, Jógvan í Lon Jacobsen, Zakaris Svabo Hansen: Faroese : An Overview and Reference Grammar. Tórshavn: Føroya Fróðskaparfelag, 2004 (p. 119 f., 325 ff.)

Pronoun

sín

  1. his, her, its, their; the third person possessive pronoun

Declension

Possessive pronoun - ognarfornavn
Singular (eintal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) sín sín sítt
Accusative (hvønnfall) sína
Dative (hvørjumfall) sínum síni / sínari sínum
Genitive (hvørsfall) (síns) (sínar) (síns)
Plural (fleirtal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) sínir sínar síni
Accusative (hvønnfall) sínar
Dative (hvørjumfall) sínum
Genitive (hvørsfall) (sína)

Hungarian

sín

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃiːn]
  • Hyphenation: sín

Etymology 1

From German Schiene (rail).

Noun

sín (plural sínek)

  1. rail
Declension
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative sín sínek
accusative sínt síneket
dative sínnek síneknek
instrumental sínnel sínekkel
causal-final sínért sínekért
translative sínné sínekké
terminative sínig sínekig
essive-formal sínként sínekként
essive-modal
inessive sínben sínekben
superessive sínen síneken
adessive sínnél síneknél
illative sínbe sínekbe
sublative sínre sínekre
allative sínhez sínekhez
elative sínből sínekből
delative sínről sínekről
ablative síntől sínektől
Possessive forms of sín
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. sínem sínjeim
2nd person sing. síned sínjeid
3rd person sing. sínje sínjei
1st person plural sínünk sínjeink
2nd person plural sínetek sínjeitek
3rd person plural sínjük sínjeik

Etymology 2

+ -n

Noun

sín

  1. superessive singular of

Icelandic

Declension of the word sín
singular plural
indef def indef def
nominative - - - -
accusative sig, sik sig, sik sig, sik sig, sik
dative sér sér sér sér
genitive sín sín sín sín

Pronoun

sín

  1. genitive singular of sig


Derived terms


Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃiːnʲ/

Etymology 1

From Middle Irish sínid, from Proto-Celtic *sīni-, from the same root as *sīros (long) (compare Old Irish sír, Welsh hir), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (late, long) (compare Sanskrit साय (sāyá, evening), Latin sērus (late), Gothic 𐍃𐌴𐌹𐌸𐌿 (seiþu, evening).

Verb

sín (present analytic síneann, future analytic sínfidh, verbal noun síneadh, past participle sínte)

  1. to stretch, extend
  2. to pass (transfer from one person to another, hand over)
  3. to lengthen
Conjugation

Etymology 2

Noun

sín f

  1. (archaic, dialectal) dative singular of síon

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sín shín
after an, tsín
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References