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Webster 1913 Edition


Mood

Mood

(moōd)
,
Noun.
[The same word as
mode
, perh. influenced by
mood
temper. See
Mode
.]
1.
Manner; style; mode; logical form; musical style; manner of action or being. See
Mode
which is the preferable form).
2.
(Gram.)
Manner of conceiving and expressing action or being, as positive, possible, conditional, hypothetical, obligatory, imperitive, etc., without regard to other accidents, such as time, person, number, etc.;
as, the indicative
mood
; the imperitive
mood
; the infinitive
mood
; the subjunctive
mood
. Same as
Mode
.

Mood

,
Noun.
[OE.
mood
,
mod
, AS.
mōd
mind, feeling, heart, courage; akin to OS. & OFries.
mōd
, D.
moed
, OHG.
muot
, G.
muth
,
mut
, courage, Dan. & Sw.
mod
, Icel.
mōðr
wrath, Goth.
mōds
.]
Temper of mind; temporary state of the mind in regard to passion or feeling; humor;
as, a melancholy
mood
; a suppliant
mood
.
Till at the last aslaked was his
mood
.
Chaucer.
Fortune is merry,
And in this
mood
will give us anything.
Shakespeare
The desperate recklessness of her
mood
.
Hawthorne.

Webster 1828 Edition


Mood

MOOD

,
Noun.
[L. modus. See Mode.]
1.
The form of an argument; the regular determination of propositions according to their quantity, as universal or particular, and their quality, as affirmative or negative.
2.
Style of music.
3.
The variation of a verb to express manner of action or being. [See Mode.]
In the foregoing senses, and in all cases, this word when derived from the Latin modus, ought to be written mode, it being a distinct word from the following.

MOOD

,
Noun.
[L. animus.]
1.
Temper of mind; temporary state of the mind in regard to passion or feeling; humor; as a melancholy mood; an angry mood; a suppliant mood.
2.
Anger; heat of temper.
[In this sense little used,unless qualified by an adjective.]

Definition 2021


Mood

Mood

See also: mood and mööd

German Low German

Noun

Mood m (no plural)

  1. courage; bravery; boldness; heart

mood

mood

See also: Mood and mööd

English

Noun

mood (plural moods)

  1. A mental or emotional state, composure.
    I've been in a bad mood since I dumped my boyfriend.
  2. A sullen mental state; a bad mood.
    He's in a mood with me today.
  3. A disposition to do something.
    I'm not in the mood for running today.
  4. A prevalent atmosphere or feeling.
    A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.
  5. (obsolete, Northern England, Scotland) Courage, heart, valor, ; also vim and vigor.
    He fought with mood in many a bloody slaught.
    He tried to lift the fallen tree with all his main and mood, but couldn't.
    • 1440, O lord omnipotentː
      She blew her horn, with main and mood.
Usage notes
  • Adjectives often used with "mood": good, bad. The phrase "with main and mood" means "with all one's might".
Synonyms
Antonyms
  • (bad mood): good humour, good mood, good spirits
Derived terms
Translations
References
See also

Etymology 2

Alteration of mode

Noun

mood (plural moods)

  1. (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
    The most common mood in English is the indicative.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
  • See also Wikisaurus:grammatical mood
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
See also

Anagrams


Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *mooto.

Noun

mood (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. fashion

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.