Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Pet

Pet

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Petted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Petting
.]
To treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge;
as, she was
petted
and spoiled
.

Pet

,
Verb.
I.
To be a pet.
Feltham.

Webster 1828 Edition


Pet

PET

,
Noun.
[This word may be contracted from petulant, or belong to the root of that word. Peevish, which is evidently a contracted word, may be from the same root.]
A slight fit of peevishness or fretful discontent.
Life given for noble purposes must not be thrown away in a pet, nor whined away in love.

PET

,
Noun.
[formerly peat. L. peto.]
1.
A cade lamb; a lamb brought up by hand.
2.
A fondling; any little animal fondled and indulged.

PET

,
Verb.
T.
To treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge.

Definition 2021


pet

pet

See also: PET, pêt, pět, and Pet.

English

Noun

Picture dictionary
petpet
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cat
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cat

dog
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dog

goldfish
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goldfish

hamster
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hamster

parakeet
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parakeet

pet (plural pets)

  1. An animal kept as a companion.
  2. (by extension) Something kept as a companion, including inanimate objects. (pet rock, pet plant, etc.)
    • 2015, Toby Fox, Undertale (video game)
      Papyrus: This is my brother's pet rock. He always forgets to feed it. As usual, I have to take responsibility.
  3. One who is excessively loyal to a superior.
  4. Any person or animal especially cherished and indulged; a darling.
    • Tatler
      the love of cronies, pets, and favourites
Synonyms
Translations

References

  1. pet” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  2. 1 2 3 pet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  3. 1 2 3 pet” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online.
  4. Schrijver, Peter (2000), “Non-Indo-European Surviving in Ireland in the First Millennium AD”, in Ériu, volume 51, pages 195–199

Verb

pet (third-person singular simple present pets, present participle petting, simple past and past participle petted)

  1. (transitive) To stroke or fondle (an animal).
  2. (transitive, informal) To stroke or fondle (another person) amorously.
  3. (intransitive, informal) Of two or more people, to stroke and fondle one another amorously.
  4. (dated, transitive) To treat as a pet; to fondle; to indulge.
    His daughter was petted and spoiled.
  5. (archaic, intransitive) To be a pet.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Feltham to this entry?)
Translations
Derived terms

Adjective

pet (not comparable)

  1. Favourite; cherished.
    a pet child
    The professor seemed offended by the criticism of her pet theory.
    • (Can we date this quote?) F. Harrison
      Some young lady's pet curate.
  2. Kept or treated as a pet.
    pet rock

Etymology 2

Clipping of petulance.

Noun

pet (plural pets)

  1. A fit of petulance, a sulk, arising from the impression that one has been offended or slighted.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 105:
      There was something ludicrous, even more, unbecoming a gentleman, in leaving a friend's house in a pet, with the host's reproaches sounding in his ears, to be matched only by the bitterness of the guest's sneering retorts.

Etymology 3

Clipping of petition.

Noun

pet (plural pets)

  1. Abbreviation of petition.

Etymology 4

Clipping of petal.

Noun

pet (plural pets)

  1. (Geordie) A term of endearment usually applied to women and children.

References

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165

See also

Anagrams


Catalan

Etymology

From Latin peditum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /ˈpət/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈpɛt/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpet/

Noun

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (colloquial) fart

Related terms


Chuukese

Etymology

Borrowing from English bed.

Noun

pet

  1. bed
    • 2010, Ewe Kapasen God, United Bible Societies, ISBN 9781920714000, Luke 5:24, page 110:
      Iwe upwe pwȧr ngeni kemi pwe mi wor an ewe Noun Aramas manamanen omusano tipis won fonufan. Iwe a apasa ngeni ewe mwan mi mwök, 'Upwe erenuk, kopwe uta, kopwe eki om na pet o feinno non imwom!"
      Therefore I will show you that the Son of Man has the power of forgiving sins on earth. So he said to the sick man, 'I tell you, stand, grab your bed and go to your house!"

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Noun

pet m (plural petten, diminutive petje n)

  1. cap (headwear with a peak at the front)

French

Etymology

Inherited from Latin pēditum.

Pronunciation

Noun

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (colloquial) fart

Synonyms

Related terms


Friulian

Etymology

From Latin pectus.

Noun

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (anatomy) chest

See also


Lojban

Rafsi

pet

  1. rafsi of petso.

Middle French

Noun

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (vulgar) fart, gas, flatulence

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛt/

Noun

pet m anim

  1. (colloquial) cigarette butt
  2. (colloquial, pejorative) cigarette

Declension

Synonyms


Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) pèz
  • (Sutsilvan) péz

Etymology

From Latin pectus.

Noun

pet m (plural pets)

  1. (Puter, Vallader, anatomy) chest, thorax

Related terms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) sain
  • (Sursilvan) sein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sagn

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pętь, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pêːt/

Numeral

pȇt (Cyrillic spelling пе̑т)

  1. (cardinal) five (5)

Slovene

Slovene numbers
< 4 6 >

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pętь, from Proto-Indo-European *pénkʷe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpéːt/
  • Tonal orthography: pẹ̑t

Numeral

pét

  1. five

Declension