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Webster 1913 Edition


Depose

De-pose′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Deposed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Deposing
.]
[FF.
déposer
, in the sense of L.
deponere
to put down; but from pref.
dé-
(L.
de
) +
poser
to place. See
Pose
,
Pause
.]
1.
To lay down; to divest one’s self of; to lay aside.
[Obs.]
Thus when the state one Edward did
depose
,
A greater Edward in his room arose.
Dryden.
2.
To let fall; to deposit.
[Obs.]
Additional mud
deposed
upon it.
Woodward.
3.
To remove from a throne or other high station; to dethrone; to divest or deprive of office.
A tyrant over his subjects, and therefore worthy to be
deposed
.
Prynne.
4.
To testify under oath; to bear testimony to; – now usually said of bearing testimony which is officially written down for future use.
Abbott.
To
depose
the yearly rent or valuation of lands.
Bacon.
5.
To put under oath.
[Obs.]
Depose
him in the justice of his cause.
Shakespeare

De-pose′

,
Verb.
I.
To bear witness; to testify under oath; to make deposition.
Then, seeing't was he that made you to
despose
,
Your oath, my lord, is vain and frivolous.
Shakespeare

Webster 1828 Edition


Depose

DEPOSE

,
Verb.
T.
[L. To lay or put.]
1.
To lay down; to throw; to let fall; as, the flood deposed fine particles of earth on the bank of the river. In this sense, we now use deposit.

Definition 2022


depose

depose

See also: dépose and déposé

English

Verb

depose (third-person singular simple present deposes, present participle deposing, simple past and past participle deposed)

  1. (literally transitive) To put down; to lay down; to deposit; to lay aside; to put away.
    • Woodword
      additional mud deposed upon it
  2. (transitive) To remove (a leader) from (high) office, without killing the incumbent.
    A deposed monarch may go into exile as pretender to the lost throne, hoping to be restored in a subsequent revolution.
    • Prynne
      a tyrant over his subjects, and therefore worthy to be deposed
  3. (law, intransitive) To give evidence or testimony, especially in response to interrogation during a deposition
  4. (law, transitive) To interrogate and elicit testimony from during a deposition; typically done by a lawyer.
    After we deposed the claimant we had enough evidence to avoid a trial.
    • Shakespeare
      Depose him in the justice of his cause.
  5. (intransitive) To take or swear an oath.
  6. To testify; to bear witness; to claim; to assert; to affirm.
    • Francis Bacon
      to depose the yearly rent or valuation of lands

Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams


Ido

Etymology

From depos (since, afterward) + -e (adverb).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de.ˈpo.se/, /dɛ.ˈpɔ.sɛ/

Adverb

depose

  1. since, from that time, thence, thenceforth

Related terms

  • depos ke (since)