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Webster 1913 Edition


Appeal

Ap-peal′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Appealed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Appealing
.]
[OE.
appelen
,
apelen
, to appeal, accuse, OF.
appeler
, fr. L.
appellare
to approach, address, invoke, summon, call, name; akin to
appellere
to drive to;
ad
+
pellere
to drive. See
Pulse
, and cf.
Peal
.]
1.
(Law)
(a)
To make application for the removal of (a cause) from an inferior to a superior judge or court for a rehearing or review on account of alleged injustice or illegality in the trial below. We say, the cause was appealed from an inferior court.
(b)
To charge with a crime; to accuse; to institute a private criminal prosecution against for some heinous crime;
as, to
appeal
a person of felony
.
2.
To summon; to challenge.
[Archaic]
Man to man will I
appeal
the Norman to the lists.
Sir W. Scott.
3.
To invoke.
[Obs.]
Milton.

Ap-peal′

,
Verb.
T.
1.
(Law)
To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reëxamination of for decision.
Tomlins.
I
appeal
unto Cæsar.
Acts xxv. 11.
2.
To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one’s rights, etc.;
as, I
appeal
to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged
. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.
I
appeal
to the Scriptures in the original.
Horsley.
They
appealed
to the sword.
Macaulay.

Ap-peal′

,
Noun.
[OE.
appel
,
apel
, OF.
apel
, F.
appel
, fr.
appeler
. See
Appeal
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
(Law)
(a)
An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for reëxamination or review.
(b)
The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected.
(c)
The right of appeal.
(d)
An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public.
(e)
An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver. See
Approvement
.
Tomlins.
Bouvier.
2.
A summons to answer to a charge.
Dryden.
3.
A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.
A kind of
appeal
to the Deity, the author of wonders.
Bacon.
4.
Resort to physical means; recourse.
Every milder method is to be tried, before a nation makes an
appeal
to arms.
Kent.

Webster 1828 Edition


Appeal

APPE'AL

,
Verb.
I.
[L. apello; ad and pello, to drive or send; Gr. We do not see the sense of call in pello, but to drive or press out, is the radical sense of calling, naming. This word coincides in elements with L. balo, Eng. bawl, and peal.]
1.
To refer to a superior judge or court, for the decision of a cause depending, or the revision of a cause decided in a lower court.
I appeal to Cesar. Acts. 21.
2.
To refer to another for the decision of a question controverted, or the counteraction of testimony or facts; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged.

APPE'AL

,
Verb.
T.
To call or remove a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court. This may be done after trial and judgment in the lower court; or by special statute or agreement, a party may appeal before trial, upon a fictitious issue and judgment. We say the cause was appealed before or after trial.

APPE'AL

,
Verb.
T.
In crimianal law, to charge with a crime; to accuse; to institute a criminal prosecution, for some hainous offense; as, to appeal a person of felony. This process was anciently given to a private person to recover the weregild, or private pecuniary satisfaction for an injury he had received by the murder of a relation, or by some personal injury.

APPE'AL

,
Noun.
1.
The removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior tribunal, as from a common pleas court to a superior or supreme court. Also the right of appeal.
2.
An accusation; a process instituted by a private person against a man for some hainous crime by which he has been injured, as for murder, larceny, mayhem.
3.
A summons to answer to a charge.
4.
A call upon a person; a reference to another for proof or decision.
In an oath, a person makes an appeal to the Deity for the truth of his declaration.
5.
Resort; recourse.
Every milder method is to be tried, before a nation makes an appeal to arms.

Definition 2022


appeal

appeal

English

Alternative forms

Verb

appeal (third-person singular simple present appeals, present participle appealing, simple past and past participle appealed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To accuse (someone of something).
  2. (transitive, law, chiefly US, informal elsewhere) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reexamination or for decision.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tomlins to this entry?)
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Acts 25:11:
      For if I be an offender, or have committed any thing worthy of death, I refuse not to die: but if there be none of these things whereof these accuse me, no man may deliver me unto them. I appeal unto Caesar.
  3. (transitive) To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.
  4. (intransitive) To be attractive.
    That idea appeals to me.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
      The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.
  5. (intransitive, cricket) To ask an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not, usually by saying "How's that" or "Howzat".
  6. To summon; to challenge.
    • Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
      Man to man will I appeal the Norman to the lists.
  7. To invoke.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • appeal against
  • appeal to

Translations

Noun

appeal (plural appeals)

  1. (law) (a) An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review. (b) The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected. (c) The right of appeal. (d) An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public. (e) An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tomlins to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bouvier to this entry?)
  2. A summons to answer to a charge.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Dryden to this entry?)
  3. A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.
    • Francis Bacon
      a kind of appeal to the Deity, the author of wonders
    1. (cricket) The act, by the fielding side, of asking an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not.
  4. Resort to physical means; recourse.
  5. The power to attract or interest.

Derived terms

Translations

See also


Italian

Etymology

Borrowing from English appeal.

Noun

appeal

  1. appeal (power to attract or interest)
  2. sex appeal

Anagrams