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Webster 1913 Edition


Lore

Lore

(lōr)
,
Noun.
[F.
lore
, L.
lorum
thong.]
(Zool.)
(a)
The space between the eye and bill, in birds, and the corresponding region in reptiles and fishes.
(b)
The anterior portion of the cheeks of insects.

Lore

,
obs.
imp.
&
p.
p.
of
Lose
.
[See
Lose
.]
Lost.
Neither of them she found where she them
lore
.
Spenser.

Lore

,
Noun.
[OE.
lore
,
lare
, AS.
lār
, fr.
lǣran
to teach; akin to D.
leer
teaching, doctrine, G.
lehre
, Dan.
lære
, Sw.
lära
. See
Learn
, and cf.
Lere
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
That which is or may be learned or known; the knowledge gained from tradition, books, or experience; often, the whole body of knowledge possessed by a people or class of people, or pertaining to a particular subject;
as, the
lore
of the Egyptians; priestly
lore
; legal
lore
; folk
lore
.
“The lore of war.”
Fairfax.
His fair offspring, nursed in princely
lore
.
Milton.
2.
That which is taught; hence, instruction; wisdom; advice; counsel.
Chaucer.
If please ye, listen to my
lore
.
Spenser.
3.
Workmanship.
[Obs.]
Spenser.

Webster 1828 Edition


Lore

LORE

,
Noun.
Learning; doctrine; lesson; instruction.
The law of nations, or the lore of war.
Lo! Rome herself, proud mistress now no more of arts, but thundering against heathen lore.

Definition 2022


Lore

Lore

See also: lore, lóre, lòre, and łore

Dutch

Proper noun

Lore ?

  1. A female given name

Anagrams


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈloːʀə/

Etymology 1

Short form of Eleonore. See Eleanor.

Proper noun

Lore

  1. A female given name
Related terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English lorry.[1]

Noun

Lore f (genitive Lore, plural Loren)

  1. A minecart.
  2. A train wagon or locomotive used in the Frisian islands in Germany.
    • 2010, 8 July, Michael Stoessinger, “Ein Bild von einem Meer”, in: Stern 28
      Nissen hat uns am Morgen mit der Lore auf einem Betriebshof bei Dagebüll abgeholt.
      Nissen picked us up in the morning with the Lore on an industrial ground near Dagebüll.

References

  1. “Lore” in: Friedrich Kluge, “Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache” , 22. Auflage, 1989, bearbeitet von Elmar Seebold, ISBN 3-11-006800-1

lore

lore

See also: Lore, łore, lóre, and lòre

English

Noun

lore (countable and uncountable, plural lores)

  1. all the facts and traditions about a particular subject that have been accumulated over time through education or experience.
    the lore of the Ancient Egyptians
    • Milton
      His fair offspring, nursed in princely lore.
  2. The backstory created around a fictional universe.
  3. (obsolete) workmanship
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Latin lorum (thong, strap)

Noun

lore (plural lores)

  1. (anatomy) The region between the eyes and nostrils of birds, reptiles, and amphibians.
  2. (anatomy) The anterior portion of the cheeks of insects.
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Verb

lore

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of lose
    • Spenser
      Neither of them she found where she them lore.

Anagrams


Basque

Etymology

From Latin flos, florem.

Noun

lore

  1. flower

Declension