Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Latin

Lat′in

,
Adj.
[F., fr. L.
Latinus
belonging to Latium, Latin, fr.
Latium
a country of Italy, in which Rome was situated. Cf.
Ladin
,
Lateen sail
, under
Lateen
.]
1.
Of or pertaining to Latium, or to the Latins, a people of Latium; Roman;
as, the
Latin
language
.
2.
Of, pertaining to, or composed in, the language used by the Romans or Latins;
as, a
Latin
grammar; a
Latin
composition or idiom.
Latin Church
(Eccl. Hist.)
,
the Western or Roman Catholic Church, as distinct from the Greek or Eastern Church.
Latin cross
.
See Illust. 1 of
Cross
.
Latin races
,
a designation sometimes loosely given to certain nations, esp. the French, Spanish, and Italians, who speak languages principally derived from Latin.
Latin Union
,
an association of states, originally comprising France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Italy, which, in 1865, entered into a monetary agreement, providing for an identity in the weight and fineness of the gold and silver coins of those countries, and for the amounts of each kind of coinage by each. Greece, Servia, Roumania, and Spain subsequently joined the Union.

Lat′in

,
Noun.
1.
A native or inhabitant of Latium; a Roman.
2.
The language of the ancient Romans.
3.
An exercise in schools, consisting in turning English into Latin.
[Obs.]
Ascham.
4.
(Eccl.)
A member of the Roman Catholic Church.
Dog Latin
,
barbarous Latin; a jargon in imitation of Latin;
as, the
log Latin
of schoolboys
.
Late Latin
,
Low Latin
,
terms used indifferently to designate the latest stages of the Latin language; low Latin (and, perhaps, late Latin also), including the barbarous coinages from the French, German, and other languages into a Latin form made after the Latin had become a dead language for the people.
Law Latin
,
that kind of late, or low, Latin, used in statutes and legal instruments; – often barbarous.

Lat′in

,
Verb.
T.
To write or speak in Latin; to turn or render into Latin.
[Obs.]
Fuller.

Webster 1828 Edition


Latin

LAT'IN

,
Adj.
Pertaining to the Latins, a people of Latium, in Italy; Roman; as the Latin language.
Latin church, the western church; the christian church in Italy, France, Spain and other countries where the Latin language was introduced, as distinct from the Greek or eastern church.

LAT'IN

, n.
1.
The language of the ancient Romans.
2.
An exercise in schools, consisting in turning English into Latin.

Definition 2021


Latin

Latin

See also: latin, latín, látin, Latîn, and Latin@

English

Alternative forms

Adjective

Latin (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to the language spoken in ancient Rome and other cities of Latium which is rarely used.
    • 1948, L. E. Elliott-Binns, The Beginnings of Western Christendom, page 257
      Africa was the natural leader because there the number of Christians who were of Roman origin and Latin speech was probably far greater than in so cosmopolitan a city as Rome.
  2. Of or relating to the script of the language spoken in ancient Rome and many modern alphabets.
    • 1968, Mladen Bošnjak, A Study of Slavic Incunabula, page 62
      The Serbo-Croatian incunabula printed in Latin letters are indubitably the products of a very modest establishment.
  3. Of or relating to ancient Rome or its Empire.
    • 2000, T. M. Charles-Edwards, Early Christian Ireland, page 176
      The earliest Latin culture of Ireland was heavily indebted to that of Britain []
  4. Of or relating to Latium (modern Lazio), the region around Rome.
    • 1913, Oscar Browning, A General History of the World, page 151
      From the Campagna and the Latin hills, the flame of rebellion spread to Antium and Terracina, and to the most remote allies of the Romans, the cities of the Campanian plains.
  5. Of or relating to the customs and people descended from the ancient Romans and their Empire.
    • 2002, Dean Foster, The Global Etiquette Guide to Mexico and Latin America, page 11
      Therefore, although Portugal is a Latin culture, the significant African influence in Brazil creates a culture that cannot be defined simply as Latin; consequently, Brazilians prefer to define themselves as South American []
  6. Of or from Latin America or of Latin American culture.
    • 2008, Michael Miller, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music History, page 254
      As such, today's Latin music is a synthesis of European, African, and the few indigenous elements that remain.
  7. (Christianity) Roman Catholic; of or pertaining to the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.
    • 1901, John Hackett, A History of the Orthodox Church of Cyprus, page 117
      The Latin bishop now took the Greek bishop by the hand and conducted him to his throne []
Quotations
  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:Latin.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English Latin, Latyn, from Old English latin ("Latin"; also found as Old English lǣden (Latin), from Vulgar Latin *ladinum (Latin)); all from Latin Latinus (belonging to Latium). Later influenced in form by the Latin word. Compare Dutch Latijn (Latin), German Latein (Latin), Swedish Latin (Latin).

Proper noun

Latin

  1. The language of the ancient Romans, other Latins and of the Roman Catholic church, especially Classical Latin.
    • 2003, Natalie Harwood, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Learning Latin, 2nd edition, page 13
      When the Christian Church rose in stature in the Dark Ages, its adoption of Latin as the official language assured its eternal life.
    • 2010, Elizabeth Heimbach, A Roman Map Workbook, page 134
      Like Copernicus and Galileo, Johannes Kepler was a renowned astronomer who wrote in Latin.
Quotations
  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:Latin.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
See also
  • Wiktionary's coverage of Latin terms
  • Latin index

Noun

Latin (plural Latins)

  1. A person native to ancient Rome or its Empire.
    • 1833, Philipp Buttmann (translated by Edward Robinson), A Greek grammar for the use of high schools and universities, page 23
      This appears incontestably from the manner in which the Latins wrote Greek words and names []
  2. A person from one of the modern European countries (including France, Spain etc.) whose language is descended from Latin.
    • 1933, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, 'All I Survey': a book of essays, page 148
      No; the test of the contrast between modern Latins and modern Teutons is exactly like the test of the contrast between modern Latins and ancient Latins.
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), page 760:
      Latins are always conspicuously dangerous when they are serving an unpopular cause for money.
  3. A person from Latin America.
    • 1922, William Edmund Aughinbaugh, Advertising for trade in Latin-America, page 150
      In the use of patent medicine the average Latin resembles the American of fifty years ago, who generally had a bottle of some concoction on which he depended whenever he felt out of sorts.
  4. (Christianity) A person adhering to Roman Catholic practice.
    • 1853, William Palmer, Dissertations on Subjects Relating to the "Orthodox" or "Eastern-Catholic" Communion, page 118
      The modern Latins have been in the habit of blaming the Greek and other Eastern Liturgies for not consecrating by the recital of OUR SAVIOUR'S words of Institution []
  5. A person native to the ancient region of Latium.
Quotations
  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:Latin.
Synonyms
Coordinate terms
Related terms
Translations

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /la.tɛ̃/

Noun

Latin m (plural Latins)

  1. Latin (person from Latium)

Derived terms

Anagrams


Malay

Etymology

From Latin latīnus, from Latium (the region around Rome) + -īnus (adjective suffix).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [laten]
  • Rhymes: -aten, -ten, -en

Proper noun

Latin

  1. Latin (language of the ancient Romans)

Synonyms


Maltese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɐˈtiːn/

Proper noun

Il-Latin m

  1. the Latin language

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lǎtiːn/
  • Hyphenation: La‧tin

Proper noun

Làtīn m (Cyrillic spelling Ла̀тӣн)

  1. Latin (person native to ancient Rome or its Empire, descended from the ancient Romans or speaking a Romance language)

Declension

latin

latin

See also: Latin, látin, latín, Latîn, and Latin@

Danish

Noun

latin n (singular definite latinen)

  1. the Latin language
  2. Latin language as a school subject

Related terms

Noun

latin n, c

  1. Latin American dance
  2. Latin American music

Finnish

Noun

latin

  1. Genitive singular form of lati.

French

Etymology

From Middle French latin, from Old French latin, a borrowing from Latin latīnus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /la.tɛ̃/

Adjective

latin m (feminine singular latine, masculine plural latins, feminine plural latines)

  1. Latin
  2. Latino

Noun

latin m (plural latins)

  1. (uncountable) the Latin language
  2. (countable) a male of South American or Mediterranean origins

Related terms

Anagrams


Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɒtin]
  • Hyphenation: la‧tin

Adjective

latin (not comparable)

  1. Roman, Latin
    latin betűkRoman characters
    a latin nyelv ― Latin

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative latin latinok
accusative latint latinokat
dative latinnak latinoknak
instrumental latinnal latinokkal
causal-final latinért latinokért
translative latinná latinokká
terminative latinig latinokig
essive-formal latinként latinokként
essive-modal
inessive latinban latinokban
superessive latinon latinokon
adessive latinnál latinoknál
illative latinba latinokba
sublative latinra latinokra
allative latinhoz latinokhoz
elative latinból latinokból
delative latinról latinokról
ablative latintól latinoktól

Derived terms

Noun

latin (plural latinok)

  1. Latin (people)
  2. (singular only) Latin (language)
    Latinul tanulok. ― I am studying Latin.

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative latin latinok
accusative latint latinokat
dative latinnak latinoknak
instrumental latinnal latinokkal
causal-final latinért latinokért
translative latinná latinokká
terminative latinig latinokig
essive-formal latinként latinokként
essive-modal latinul
inessive latinban latinokban
superessive latinon latinokon
adessive latinnál latinoknál
illative latinba latinokba
sublative latinra latinokra
allative latinhoz latinokhoz
elative latinból latinokból
delative latinról latinokról
ablative latintól latinoktól
Possessive forms of latin
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. latinom latinjaim
2nd person sing. latinod latinjaid
3rd person sing. latinja latinjai
1st person plural latinunk latinjaink
2nd person plural latinotok latinjaitok
3rd person plural latinjuk latinjaik

Middle French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Old French latin.

Noun

latin m (uncountable)

  1. Latin language

Adjective

latin m (feminine singular latine, masculine plural latins, feminine plural latines)

  1. Latin (relating to the Latin language)

Descendants


Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑtiːn/
  • Rhymes: -iːn

Noun

latin m (definite singular latinen) (uncountable)

  1. Latin (the language)

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

latin m (definite singular latinen) (uncountable)

  1. Latin (the language)

Derived terms

References


Occitan

Etymology

From Latin latīnus.

Noun

latin m (uncountable)

  1. the Latin language

Old French

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin latīnus.

Noun

latin m (nominative singular latins)

  1. Latin language
    • circa 1250, Rutebeuf, Ci commence le miracle de Théophile:
      S'en sui plus dolenz, Salatin,
      Quar en françois ne en latin
      Ne finai onques de proier
      I am very sad about it, Satan
      For neither in French nor in Latin
      Have I stopped praying for you

Descendants


Romanian

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin latīnus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /laˈtin/

Adjective

latin m, n (feminine singular latină, masculine plural latini, feminine and neuter plural latine)

  1. Latin

Declension

See also


Swedish

Noun

latin n

  1. Latin language

Declension

Related terms