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Webster 1913 Edition


Haul

Haul

(ha̤l)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Hauled
(ha̤ld)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Hauling
.]
[OE.
halen
,
halien
, F.
haler
, of German or Scand. origin; akin to AS.
geholian
to acquire, get, D.
halen
to fetch, pull, draw, OHG.
holōn
,
halōn
, G.
holen
, Dan.
hale
to haul, Sw.
hala
, and to L.
calare
to call, summon, Gr.
καλεῖν
to call. Cf.
Hale
,
Verb.
T.
,
Claim
.
Class
,
Council
,
Ecclesiastic
.]
1.
To pull or draw with force; to drag.
Some dance, some
haul
the rope.
Denham.
Thither they bent, and
hauled
their ships to land.
Pope.
Romp-loving miss
Is
hauled
about in gallantry robust.
Thomson.
2.
To transport by drawing, as with horses or oxen;
as, to
haul
logs to a sawmill
.
When I was seven or eight years of age, I began
hauling
all the wood used in the house and shops.
U. S. Grant.
To haul over the coals
.
See under
Coal
.
To haul the wind
(Naut.)
,
to turn the head of the ship nearer to the point from which the wind blows.

Haul

,
Verb.
I.
1.
(Naut.)
To change the direction of a ship by hauling the wind. See under
Haul
,
Verb.
T.
I . . .
hauled
up for it, and found it to be an island.
Cook.
2.
To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked.
To haul around
(Naut.)
,
to shift to any point of the compass; – said of the wind.
To haul off
(Naut.)
,
to sail closer to the wind, in order to get farther away from anything; hence, to withdraw; to draw back.

Haul

,
Noun.
1.
A pulling with force; a violent pull.
2.
A single draught of a net;
as, to catch a hundred fish at a
haul
.
3.
That which is caught, taken, or gained at once, as by hauling a net.
4.
Transportation by hauling; the distance through which anything is hauled, as freight in a railroad car;
as, a long
haul
or short
haul
.
5.
(Rope Making)
A bundle of about four hundred threads, to be tarred.

Webster 1828 Edition


Haul

HAUL

, v.t.
1.
To pull or draw with force; to drag; as, to haul a heavy body along on the ground; to haul a boat on shore. Haul is equivalent to drag, and differs sometimes from pull and draw, in expressing more force and labor. It is much used by seamen; as, to haul down the sails; haul in the boom; haul aft, &c.
2.
To drag; to compel to go.
Lest he haul thee to the judge. Luke 12.
When applied to persons, haul implies compulsion or rudeness, or both.
To haul the wind, in seamanship, is to turn the head of the ship nearer to the point from which the wind blows, by arranging the sails more obliquely, bracing the yards more forward, hauling the sheets more aft, &c.

HAUL

,
Noun.
A pulling with force; a violent pull.
1.
A draft of a net; as, to catch a hundred fish at a haul.

Definition 2022


haul

haul

English

Verb

haul (third-person singular simple present hauls, present participle hauling, simple past and past participle hauled)

  1. To carry something; to transport something, with a connotation that the item is heavy or otherwise difficult to move.
  2. To pull or draw something heavy.
    • 2016 May 22, Phil McNulty, “Crystal Palace 1-2 Manchester United”, in BBC:
      United lost Smalling to a second yellow card for hauling back Yannick Bolasie in extra time - but Lingard took the trophy to Old Trafford when he lashed home a first-time strike from Damien Delaney's half-clearance after 110 minutes.
    • Denham
      Some dance, some haul the rope.
    • Alexander Pope
      Thither they bent, and hauled their ships to land.
  3. To transport by drawing, as with horses or oxen.
    to haul logs to a sawmill
    • Ulysses S. Grant
      When I was seven or eight years of age, I began hauling all the wood used in the house and shops.
  4. (nautical) To steer a vessel closer to the wind.
    • Cook
      I [] hauled up for it, and found it to be an island.
  5. (nautical, of the wind) To shift fore (more towards the bow).
  6. (figuratively) To pull.
    • 2012 April 21, Jonathan Jurejko, “Newcastle 3-0 Stoke”, in BBC Sport:
      The 26-year-old has proved a revelation since his £10m move from Freiburg, with his 11 goals in 10 matches hauling Newcastle above Spurs, who went down to Adel Taarabt's goal in Saturday's late kick-off at Loftus Road.
  7. To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when yoked.

Derived terms

Antonyms

  • (to steer closer to the wind): veer
  • (to shift aft): veer

Translations

Derived terms

Noun

haul (plural hauls)

  1. A long drive, especially transporting/hauling heavy cargo.
  2. An amount of something that has been taken, especially of fish or illegal loot.
    The robber's haul was over thirty items.
    The trawler landed a ten-ton haul.
  3. A pulling with force; a violent pull.
  4. (ropemaking) A bundle of many threads, to be tarred.
  5. Collectively, all of the products bought on a shopping trip.
  6. A haul video

Translations

Anagrams


Luxembourgish

Verb

haul

  1. second-person singular imperative of haulen

Welsh

Etymology

From Middle Welsh heul, from Proto-Celtic *sāwol (compare Cornish howl, Breton heol; compare also Old Irish súil (eye)), from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /haɨ̯l/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /hai̯l/

Noun

haul m (plural heuliau)

  1. sun

Derived terms