Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Core

Core

(kōr)
,
Noun.
[F.
corps
. See
Corps
.]
A body of individuals; an assemblage.
[Obs.]
He was in a
core
of people.
Bacon.

Core

,
Noun.
[Cf.
Chore
.]
(Mining.)
A miner’s underground working time or shift.
Raymond.
☞ The twenty-four hours are divided into three or four cores.

Core

,
Noun.
[Heb.
kōr
: cf. Gr.
κόρος
.]
A Hebrew dry measure; a cor or homer.
Num. xi. 32 (Douay version).

Core

,
Noun.
[OF.
cor
,
coer
,
cuer
, F.
cœur
, fr. L.
cor
heart. See
Heart
.]
1.
The heart or inner part of a thing, as of a column, wall, rope, of a boil, etc.; especially, the central part of fruit, containing the kernels or seeds;
as, the
core
of an apple or quince
.
A fever at the
core
,
Fatal to him who bears, to all who ever bore.
Byron.
2.
The center or inner part, as of an open space;
as, the
core
of a square
.
[Obs.]
Sir W. Raleigh.
4.
(Founding)
The portion of a mold which shapes the interior of a cylinder, tube, or other hollow casting, or which makes a hole in or through a casting; a part of the mold, made separate from and inserted in it, for shaping some part of the casting, the form of which is not determined by that of the pattern.
5.
A disorder of sheep occasioned by worms in the liver.
[Prov. Eng.]
Halliwell.
6.
(Anat.)
The bony process which forms the central axis of the horns in many animals.
Core box
(Founding)
,
a box or mold, usually divisible, in which cores are molded.
Core print
(Founding)
,
a projecting piece on a pattern which forms, in the mold, an impression for holding in place or steadying a core.
Core dump
See
core dump
in the vocabulary.

Core

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Cord
(k?rd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Coring
.]
1.
To take out the core or inward parts of;
as, to
core
an apple
.
He's like a corn upon my great toe . . . he must be
cored
out.
Marston.
2.
To form by means of a core, as a hole in a casting.

Webster 1828 Edition


Core

CORE

,
Noun.
[L., the heart. Gr. See Class Gr.]
1.
The heart or inner part of a thing; particularly, the central part of fruit, containing the kernels or seeds; as the core of an apple or quince. It was formerly applied to place; as, in the core of a square.
2.
The inner part of an ulcer or boil.
3.
A body. [Not used.]
4.
A disorder of sheep, occasioned by worms in the liver.

Definition 2022


Core

Core

See also: core, CORE, and -core

English

Alternative forms

Proper noun

Core

  1. (Greek mythology) The birth name of Persephone/Proserpina, the queen of the Underworld/Hades, and goddess of the seasons and of vegetation. She is the daughter of Zeus and Demeter; and the wife of Hades.
  2. A female given name

Coordinate terms

Derived terms

core

core

See also: Core, CORE, Coré, côre, çore, -core, and co-r.e.

Translingual

Etymology

From English

Adjective

core

  1. Used to designate the main and most diverse monophyletic group within a clade or taxonomic group.

Coordinate terms

Derived terms


English

Noun

core (countable and uncountable, plural cores)

  1. The central part of fruit, containing the kernels or seeds.
    the core of an apple or quince
  2. The heart or inner part of a thing, as of a column, wall, rope, of a boil, etc.
    • 2013 March 1, Nancy Langston, Mining the Boreal North”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 2, page 98:
      Reindeer are well suited to the taiga’s frigid winters. They can maintain a thermogradient between body core and the environment of up to 100 degrees, in part because of insulation provided by their fur, and in part because of counter-current vascular heat exchange systems in their legs and nasal passages.
  3. The center or inner part, as of an open space.
    the core of a square
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Raleigh to this entry?)
  4. The most important part of a thing; the essence.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, in The Onion AV Club:
      Jones’ sad eyes betray a pervasive pain his purposefully spare dialogue only hints at, while the perfectly cast Brolin conveys hints of playfulness and warmth while staying true to the craggy stoicism at the character’s core.
    • 2013 June 22, Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
    the core of a subject
  5. (engineering) The portion of a mold that creates an internal cavity within a casting or that makes a hole in or through a casting.
  6. The bony process which forms the central axis of the horns in many animals.
  7. (computing) Magnetic data storage.
  8. (computer hardware) An individual computer processor, in the sense when several processors (called cores) are plugged together in one single integrated circuit to work as one (called multi-core processor).
    I wanted to play a particular computer game, which required I buy a new computer, so while the game said it needed at least a dual-core processor, I wanted my computer to be a bit ahead of the curve, so I bought a quad-core.
  9. (engineering) The material between surface materials in a structured composite sandwich material.
    a floor panel with a Nomex honeycomb core
  10. The inner part of a nuclear reactor in which the nuclear reaction takes place.
  11. A piece of soft iron, inside the windings of an electromagnet, that channels the magnetic field.
  12. A disorder of sheep caused by worms in the liver.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  13. A cylindrical sample of rock or other materials obtained by core drilling.
  14. (medicine) A tiny sample of organic material obtained by means of a fine-needle biopsy.
  15. (biochemistry) The central part of a protein structure consisting in mostly hydrophobic aminoacids.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

core (third-person singular simple present cores, present participle coring, simple past and past participle cored)

  1. To remove the core of an apple or other fruit.
  2. To extract a sample with a drill.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

See corps

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (obsolete) A body of individuals; an assemblage.
    • Francis Bacon
      He was in a core of people.
Translations

Etymology 3

See chore

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. A miner's underground working time or shift.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
Translations

Etymology 4

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. A Hebrew dry measure; a cor or homer.
Translations

Etymology 5

Possibly an acronym for cash on return

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (automotive, machinery, aviation, marine) A deposit paid by the purchaser of a rebuilt part, to be refunded on return of a used, rebuildable part, or the returned rebuildable part itself.

Istriot

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun

core

  1. heart
    • Ti son la manduleîna del mio core;
      You are the almond of my heart;

Latin

Noun

core

  1. ablative singular of coris

Neapolitan

Etymology

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun

core ? (please add the plural)

  1. heart
    T'alluntane da stu core
    You are walking away from this heart

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowing from English core.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.ɾi/, /ˈkɔɹ/

Noun

core m (plural cores)

  1. (computer architecture) core (independent unit in a processor with several such units)
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.ɾi/

Verb

core

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of corar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of corar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of corar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of corar