Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Resolve

Re-solve′

(r?-z?lv′)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Resolved
(-z?lvd′)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Resolving
.]
[L.
resolvere
,
resolutum
, to untie, loosen, relax, enfeeble; pref.
re-
re- +
solvere
to loosen, dissolve: cf. F.
résoudare
to resolve. See
Solve
, and cf.
Resolve
,
Verb.
I.
,
Resolute
,
Resolution
.]
1.
To separate the component parts of; to reduce to the constituent elements; – said of compound substances; hence, sometimes, to melt, or dissolve.
O, that this too too solid flesh would melt,
Thaw, and
resolve
itself into a dew!
Shakespeare
Ye immortal souls, who once were men,
And now
resolved
to elements again.
Dryden.
2.
To reduce to simple or intelligible notions; – said of complex ideas or obscure questions; to make clear or certain; to free from doubt; to disentangle; to unravel; to explain; hence, to clear up, or dispel, as doubt;
as, to
resolve
a riddle
.
Resolve my doubt.”
Shak.
To the
resolving
whereof we must first know that the Jews were commanded to divorce an unbelieving Gentile.
Milton.
3.
To cause to perceive or understand; to acquaint; to inform; to convince; to assure; to make certain.
Sir, be
resolved
. I must and will come.
Beau. & Fl.
Resolve
me, Reason, which of these is worse,
Want with a full, or with an empty purse?
Pope.
In health, good air, pleasure, riches, I am
resolved
it can not be equaled by any region.
Sir W. Raleigh.
We must be
resolved
how the law can be pure and perspicuous, and yet throw a polluted skirt over these Eleusinian mysteries.
Milton.
4.
To determine or decide in purpose; to make ready in mind; to fix; to settle;
as, he was
resolved
by an unexpected event
.
5.
To express, as an opinion or determination, by resolution and vote; to declare or decide by a formal vote; – followed by a clause;
as, the house resolved (or, it was resolved by the house) that no money should be apropriated (or, to appropriate no money)
.
6.
To change or convert by resolution or formal vote; – used only reflexively;
as, the house
resolved
itself into a committee of the whole
.
7.
(Math.)
To solve, as a problem, by enumerating the several things to be done, in order to obtain what is required; to find the answer to, or the result of.
Hutton.
8.
(Med.)
To dispere or scatter; to discuss, as an inflammation or a tumor.
9.
(Mus.)
To let the tones (as of a discord) follow their several tendencies, resulting in a concord.
10.
To relax; to lay at ease.
[Obs.]
B. Jonson.
To resolve a nebula
.
(Astron.)
See
Resolution of a nebula
, under
Resolution
.
Syn. – To solve; analyze; unravel; disentangle.

Re-solve′

(r?-z?lv′)
,
Verb.
I.
[The sense “to be convinced, to determine” comes from the idea of loosening, breaking up into parts, analyzing, hence, determining.]
1.
To be separated into its component parts or distinct principles; to undergo resolution.
2.
To melt; to dissolve; to become fluid.
When the blood stagnates in any part, it first coagulates, then
resolves
, and turns alkaline.
Arbuthhnot.
3.
To be settled in opinion; to be convinced.
[R.]
Let men
resolve
of that as they plaease.
Locke.
4.
To form a purpose; to make a decision; especially, to determine after reflection;
as, to
resolve
on a better course of life
.
Syn. – To determine; decide; conclude; purpose.

Re-solve′

,
Noun.
1.
The act of resolving or making clear; resolution; solution.
“To give a full resolve of that which is so much controverted.”
Milton.
2.
That which has been resolved on or determined; decisive conclusion; fixed purpose; determination; also, legal or official determination; a legislative declaration; a resolution.
Nor is your firm
resolve
unknown.
Shakespeare
Caesar’s approach has summoned us together,
And Rome attends her fate from our
resolves
.
Addison.

Webster 1828 Edition


Resolve

RESOLVE

,
Verb.
T.
rezolv'. [L. resolvo; re and solvo, to loose.]
1.
To separate the component parts of a compound substance; to reduce to first principles; as, to resolve a body into its component or constituent parts; to resolve a body into its elements.
2.
To separate the parts of a complex idea; to reduce to simple parts; to analyze.
3.
To separate the parts of a complicated question; to unravel; to disentangle of perplexities; to remove obscurity by analysis; to clear of difficulties; to explain; as, to resolve questions in moral science; to resolve doubts; to resolve a riddle.
4.
To inform to free from doubt or perplexity; as, to resolve the conscience.
Resolve me, stranger, whence and what you are?
5.
To settle in an opinion; to make certain.
Long since we were resolv'd of your truth, your faithful service and your toil in war.
6.
To confirm; to fix in constancy.
Quit presently the chapel, or resolve you for more amazement. [Unusual.]
7.
To melt; to dissolve.
8.
To form or constitute by resolution, vote or determination; as, the house resolved itself into a committee of the whole.
9.
In music, to resolve a discord or dissonance, is to carry it, according to rule, into a consonance in the subsequent chord.
10.
In medicine, to disperse or scatter; to discuss; as inflammation or a tumor.
11.
To relax; to lay at ease.
12.
In algebra, to resolve an equation, is to bring all the known quantities to one side of the equation, and the unknown quantity to the other.

RESOLVE

,
Verb.
I.
rezolv'.
1.
To fix in opinion or purpose; to determine in mind. He resolved to abandon his vicious course of life.
2.
To determine by vote. The legislature resolved to receive no petitions after a certain day.
3.
To melt; to dissolve; to become fluid.
When the blood stagnates in any part, it first coagulates, then resolves and turns alkaline.
4.
To separate into its component parts, or into distinct principles; as, water resolves into vapor; a substance resolves into gas.
5.
To be settled in opinion.
Let men resolve of that as they please. [Unusual.]

RESOLVE

,
Noun.
rezolv'.
1.
Fixed purpose of mind; settled determination; resolution.
He strait revokes his bold resolve.
2.
Legal or official determination; legislative act concerning a private person or corporation, or concerning some private business. Public acts of a legislature respect the state, and to give them validity, the bills for such acts must pass through all the legislative forms. Resolves are usually private acts, and are often passed with less formality. Resolves may also be the acts of a single branch of the legislature; whereas public acts must be passed by a majority of both branches.
3.
The determination of any corporation or association; resolution.

Definition 2022


resolve

resolve

See also: résolvé, résolve, resolvé, and resolvê

English

Verb

resolve (third-person singular simple present resolves, present participle resolving, simple past and past participle resolved)

  1. (transitive) To find a solution to (a problem).
  2. (transitive) To reduce to simple or intelligible notions; to make clear or certain; to unravel; to explain.
    to resolve a riddle
    • Shakespeare
      Resolve my doubt.
  3. (transitive) To solve again.
    I’ll have to resolve the equation with the new values.
  4. (intransitive) To make a firm decision to do something.
    I resolve to finish this work before I go home.
    • 1762, Charles Johnstone, The Reverie; or, A Flight to the Paradise of Fools, volume 2, Dublin: Printed by Dillon Chamberlaine, OCLC 519072825, page 202:
      At length, one night, when the company by ſome accident broke up much ſooner than ordinary, ſo that the candles were not half burnt out, ſhe was not able to reſiſt the temptation, but reſolved to have them ſome way or other. Accordingly, as ſoon as the hurry was over, and the ſervants, as ſhe thought, all gone to ſleep, ſhe ſtole out of her bed, and went down ſtairs, naked to her ſhift as ſhe was, with a deſign to ſteal them []
  5. (transitive) To determine or decide in purpose; to make ready in mind; to fix; to settle.
    He was resolved by an unexpected event.
  6. To come to an agreement or make peace; patch up relationship, settle differences, bury the hatchet.
    After two weeks of bickering, they finally resolved their differences.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, reflexive) To break down into constituent parts; to decompose; to disintegrate; to return to a simpler constitution or a primeval state.
    • Shakespeare
      O, that this too too solid flesh would melt, / Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!
    • Dryden
      Ye immortal souls, who once were men, / And now resolved to elements again.
    • 2013 July-August, Fenella Saunders, Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture”, in American Scientist:
      The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.
  8. To cause to perceive or understand; to acquaint; to inform; to convince; to assure; to make certain.
    • Alexander Pope
      Resolve me, Reason, which of these is worse, / Want with a full, or with an empty purse?
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      In health, good air, pleasure, riches, I am resolved it can not be equalled by any region.
    • Milton
      We must be resolved how the law can be pure and perspicuous, and yet throw a polluted skirt over these Eleusinian mysteries.
  9. (music) To cause a chord to go from dissonance to consonance.
  10. (computing) To find the IP address of a hostname, or the entity referred to by a symbol in source code; to look up.
  11. (rare, transitive) To melt; to dissolve; to liquefy or soften (a solid).
  12. (rare, intransitive, reflexive) To melt; to dissolve; to become liquid.
    • Arbuthnot
      When the blood stagnates in any part, it first coagulates, then resolves, and turns alkaline.
  13. (obsolete, transitive) To liquefy (a gas or vapour).
  14. (medicine, dated) To disperse or scatter; to discuss, as an inflammation or a tumour.
  15. (obsolete) To relax; to lay at ease.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
  16. (chemistry) To separate racemic compounds into their enantiomers.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

Noun

resolve (plural resolves)

  1. Determination, will power.
    It took all my resolve to go through with it.
    • 2011 October 1, Saj Chowdhury, “Wolverhampton 1 - 2 Newcastle”, in BBC Sport:
      Alan Pardew's current squad has been put together with a relatively low budget but the resolve and unity within the team is priceless.

Synonyms

Translations


Italian

Verb

resolve

  1. third-person singular present indicative of resolvere

Anagrams


Latin

Verb

resolve

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of resolvō

Portuguese

Verb

resolve

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of resolver
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of resolver