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Webster 1913 Edition


Poise

Poise

,
Noun.
[OE.
pois
,
peis
, OF.
pois
,
peis
, F.
poids
, fr. L.
pensum
a portion weighed out,
pendere
to weigh, weigh out. Cf.
Avoirdupois
,
Pendant
,
Poise
,
Verb.
]
[Formerly written also
peise
.]
1.
Weight; gravity; that which causes a body to descend; heaviness.
“Weights of an extraordinary poise.”
Evelyn.
2.
The weight, or mass of metal, used in weighing, to balance the substance weighed.
3.
The state of being balanced by equal weight or power; equipoise; balance; equilibrium; rest.
Bentley.
4.
That which causes a balance; a counterweight.
Men of unbounded imagination often want the
poise
of judgment.
Dryden.

Poise

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Poised
,;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Poising
.]
[OE.
poisen
,
peisen
, OF. & F.
peser
, to weigh, balance, OF. il
peise
, il
poise
, he weighs, F. il
pèse
, fr. L.
pensare
, v. intens. fr.
pendere
to weigh. See
Poise
,
Noun.
, and cf.
Pensive
.]
[Formerly written also
peise
.]
1.
To balance; to make of equal weight;
as, to
poise
the scales of a balance
.
2.
To hold or place in equilibrium or equiponderance.
Nor yet was earth suspended in the sky;
Nor
poised
, did on her own foundation lie.
Dryden.
3.
To counterpoise; to counterbalance.
One scale of reason to
poise
another of sensuality.
Shakespeare
To
poise
with solid sense a sprightly wit.
Dryden.
4.
To ascertain, as by the balance; to weigh.
He can not sincerely consider the strength,
poise
the weight, and discern the evidence.
South.
5.
To weigh (down); to oppress.
[Obs.]
Lest leaden slumber
peise
me down to-morrow.
Shakespeare

Poise

,
Verb.
I.
To hang in equilibrium; to be balanced or suspended; hence, to be in suspense or doubt.
The slender, graceful spars
Poise
aloft in air.
Longfellow.

Webster 1828 Edition


Poise

POISE

,
Noun.
poiz.
1.
Weight; gravity; that which causes a body to descend or tend to the center.
2.
The weight or mass of metal used in weighing with steelyards, to balance the substance weighed.
3.
Balance; equilibrium; a state in which things are balanced by equal weight or power; equipoise. The mind may rest in a poise between two opinions.
The particles forming the earth, must convene from all quarters towards the middle, which would make the whole compound rest in a poise.
4.
A regulating power; that which balances.
Men of an unbounded imagination often want the poise of judgment.

POISE

,
Verb.
T.
poiz.
1.
To balance in weight; to make of equal weight; as, to poise the scales of a balance.
2.
To hold or place in equilibrium or equiponderance.
Our nation with united interest blest,
Not now content to poise, shall sway the rest.
3.
To load with weight for balancing.
Where could they find another form so fit,
To poise with solid sense a sprightly wit?
4.
To examine or ascertain, as by the balance; to weigh.
He cannot consider the strength, poise the weight, and discern the evidence of the clearest argumentations, where they would conclude against his desires.
5.
To oppress; to weigh down.
Lest leaden slumber poise me down to-morrow,
When I should mount on wings of victory.

Definition 2021


poise

poise

English

Noun

poise (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Weight; an amount of weight, the amount something weighs.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.xii:
      as an huge rockie clift, / Whose false foundation waues haue washt away, / With dreadfull poyse is from the mayneland rift, / [...] So downe he fell [...].
  2. The weight, or mass of metal, used in weighing, to balance the substance weighed.
  3. That which causes a balance; a counterweight.
    • Dryden
      Men of unbounded imagination often want the poise of judgment.
  4. A state of balance, equilibrium or stability.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bentley to this entry?)
  5. Composure; freedom from embarrassment or affectation.
  6. Mien; bearing or deportment of the head or body.
  7. A condition of hovering, or being suspended.
  8. (physics) A cgs unit of dynamic viscosity equal to one dyne-second per square centimeter.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

poise (third-person singular simple present poises, present participle poising, simple past and past participle poised)

  1. (obsolete) To hang in equilibrium; to be balanced or suspended; hence, to be in suspense or doubt.
    • Longfellow
      The slender, graceful spars / Poise aloft in air.
  2. (obsolete) To counterpoise; to counterbalance.
    • Shakespeare
      one scale of reason to poise another of sensuality
    • Dryden
      to poise with solid sense a sprightly wit
  3. (obsolete) To be of a given weight; to weigh. [14th-17th c.]
  4. (obsolete) To add weight to, to weigh down. [16th-18th c.]
  5. (now rare) To hold (something) with or against something else in equilibrium; to balance, counterpose. [from 16th c.]
    • 1597, William Shakespeare, Romeo & Juliet, I.2:
      you saw her faire none els being by, / Her selfe poysd with her selfe in either eye.
  6. To hold (something) in equilibrium, to hold balanced and ready; to carry (something) ready to be used. [from 16th c.]
    I poised the crowbar in my hand, and waited.
    to poise the scales of a balance
    • Dryden
      Nor yet was earth suspended in the sky; / Nor poised, did on her own foundation lie.
  7. To keep (something) in equilibrium; to hold suspended or balanced. [from 17th c.]
    The rock was poised precariously on the edge of the cliff.
  8. To ascertain, as if by balancing; to weigh.
    • South
      He cannot sincerely consider the strength, poise the weight, and discern the evidence.

Translations


Old French

Alternative forms

Noun

poise f (oblique plural poises, nominative singular poise, nominative plural poises)

  1. weight
  2. a unit of measure of unknown value (which presumably varied because of the technology of the time)

Descendants

  • English: poise (borrowed)

References

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (poise)