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Webster 1913 Edition


Knit

Knit

(nĭt)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Knit
or
Knitted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Knitting
.]
[OE.
knitten
,
knutten
, As.
cnyttan
, fr.
cnotta
knot; akin to Icel.
knȳta
, Sw.
knyta
, Dan.
knytte
. See
Knot
.]
1.
To form into a knot, or into knots; to tie together, as cord; to fasten by tying.
A great sheet
knit
at the four corners.
Acts x. 11.
When your head did but ache,
I
knit
my handkercher about your brows.
Shakespeare
2.
To form, as a textile fabric, by the interlacing of yarn or thread in a series of connected loops, by means of needles, either by hand or by machinery;
as, to
knit
stockings
.
3.
To join; to cause to grow together.
Nature can not
knit
the bones while the parts are under a discharge.
Wiseman.
4.
To unite closely; to connect; to engage;
as, hearts
knit
together in love
.
Thy merit hath my duty strongly
knit
.
Shakespeare
Come,
knit
hands, and beat the ground,
In a light fantastic round.
Milton (Comus).
A link among the days, to
knit

The generations each to each.
Tennyson.
5.
To draw together; to contract into wrinkles.
He
knits
his brow and shows an angry eye.
Shakespeare

Knit

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To form a fabric by interlacing yarn or thread; to weave by making knots or loops.
2.
To be united closely; to grow together;
as, broken bones will in time
knit
and become sound
.
To knit up
,
to wind up; to conclude; to come to a close.
“It remaineth to knit up briefly with the nature and compass of the seas.”
[Obs.]
Holland.

Knit

,
Noun.
Union knitting; texture.
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Knit

KNIT

,
Verb.
T.
nit.
pret. and pp. knit or knitted. [L. nodo,whence nodus, Eng. knot.]
1.
To unite, as threads by needles; to connect in a kind of net-work; as, to knit a stocking.
2.
To unite closely; as, let our hearts be knit together in love.
3.
To join or cause to grow together.
Nature cannot knit the bones, while the parts are under a discharge.
4.
To tie; to fasten.
And he saw heaven opened,and a certain vessel descending to him, as it were a great sheet knit at the four corners. Acts.10.
5.
To draw together; to contract; as, to knit the brows.

KNIT

,
Verb.
I.
nit.
To unite or interweave by needles.
1.
To unite closely; to grow together. Broken bones will in time knit and become sound.

KNIT

,
Noun.
nit.
Union by knitting; texture. [Little used.]

Definition 2023


knit

knit

English

Knitting

Verb

knit (third-person singular simple present knits, present participle knitting, simple past and past participle knit or knitted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To turn thread or yarn into a piece of fabric by forming loops that are pulled through each other. This can be done by hand with needles or by machine.
    to knit a stocking
    The first generation knitted to order; the second still knits for its own use; the next leaves knitting to industrial manufacturers.
  2. (figuratively, transitive) To join closely and firmly together.
    The fight for survival knitted the men closely together.
    • Wiseman
      Nature cannot knit the bones while the parts are under a discharge.
    • Shakespeare
      Thy merit hath my duty strongly knit.
    • Milton
      Come, knit hands, and beat the ground, / In a light fantastic round.
    • Tennyson
      A link among the days, to knit / The generations each to each.
  3. (intransitive) To become closely and firmly joined; become compacted.
  4. (intransitive) To grow together.
    All those seedlings knitted into a kaleidoscopic border.
  5. (transitive) To combine from various elements.
    The witness knitted together his testimony from contradictory pieces of hearsay.
  6. (intransitive) Of bones: to heal following a fracture.
    I’ll go skiing again after my bones knit.
  7. (transitive) To form into a knot, or into knots; to tie together, as cord; to fasten by tying.
    • Bible, Acts x. 11
      a great sheet knit at the four corners
    • William Shakespeare
      When your head did but ache, / I knit my handkercher about your brows.
  8. (transitive) To draw together; to contract into wrinkles.
    • William Shakespeare
      He knits his brow and shows an angry eye.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Anagrams