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Webster 1913 Edition


Kitchen

Kitch′en

(kĭch′ĕn)
,
Noun.
[OE.
kichen
,
kichene
,
kuchene
, AS.
cycene
, L.
coquina
, equiv. to
culina
a kitchen, fr.
coquinus
pertaining to cooking, fr.
coquere
to cook. See
Cook
to prepare food, and cf.
Cuisine
.]
1.
A room equipped for cooking food; the room of a house, restaurant, or other building appropriated to cookery.
Cool was his
kitchen
, though his brains were hot.
Dryden.
A fat
kitchen
makes a lean will.
Franklin.
2.
A utensil for roasting meat;
as, a tin
kitchen
.
Kitchen garden
.
See under
Garden
.
Kitchen lee
,
dirty soapsuds.
[Obs.]
“A brazen tub of kitchen lee.”
Ford.
Kitchen stuff
,
fat collected from pots and pans.
Donne.

Kitch′en

,
Verb.
T.
To furnish food to; to entertain with the fare of the kitchen.
[Obs.]
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Kitchen

KITCH'EN

,
Noun.
[L. coquina; from the root of L. coquo, to cook.]
1.
A cook-room; the room of a house appropriated to cookery.
A fat kitchen makes a lean will.
2.
In ships, the galley or caboose.
3.
A utensil for roasting meat; as a tin kitchen.

Definition 2023


Kitchen

Kitchen

See also: kitchen

English

Proper noun

Kitchen

  1. A surname.
    • 2004, Andy Hertzfeld, Revolution in The Valley (page 268)
      Steve Kitchen was a fast-talking, enthusiastic entrepreneur who had developed a couple of successful Atari video games.

kitchen

kitchen

See also: Kitchen

English

A modern kitchen.

Noun

kitchen (plural kitchens)

  1. A room or area for preparing food.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess:
      Everything a living animal could do to destroy and to desecrate bed and walls had been done. []  A canister of flour from the kitchen had been thrown at the looking-glass and lay like trampled snow over the remains of a decent blue suit with the lining ripped out which lay on top of the ruin of a plastic wardrobe.
  2. Cuisine.
  3. (African American Vernacular) The nape of a person's hairline, often referring to its uncombed or "nappy" look.
  4. (music) The percussion section of an orchestra.
    • 1981, Norman Del Mar, Anatomy of the Orchestra,
      For obvious reasons the percussion is normally arranged along the back of the platform, whether centrally or to one side, and sometimes also in two tiers, the heavy, noisier instruments behind, and the pitched, agile instruments such as vibraphone, marimba, etc. in front. An outstanding exception, however, exists in Roberto Gerhard's Epithalamion where the composer expressly desired that the all-important kitchen department be spread out in front of the strings and hence nearest the audience.
  5. (dated) A utensil for roasting meat.
    a tin kitchen
  6. (attributive) In a domesticated or uneducated form (of a language).

Usage notes

  • (area for preparing food): A kitchen fruit, kitchen apple, or the like, or one good for the kitchen, is one suitable for use in prepared foods.

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