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Webster 1913 Edition


Glad

Glad

(glăd)
,
Adj.
[
Com
par.
Gladder
;
sup
erl.
Gladdest
.]
[AS.
glæd
bright, glad; akin to D.
glad
smooth, G.
glatt
, OHG.
glat
smooth, shining, Icel.
glaðr
glad, bright, Dan. & Sw.
glad
glad, Lith.
glodas
smooth, and prob. to L.
glaber
, and E.
glide
. Cf.
Glabrous
.]
1.
Pleased; joyous; happy; cheerful; gratified; – opposed to
sorry
,
sorrowful
, or
unhappy
; – said of persons, and often followed by of, at, that, or by the infinitive, and sometimes by with, introducing the cause or reason.
A wise son maketh a
glad
father.
Prov. x. 1.
He that is
glad
at calamities shall not be unpunished.
Prov. xvii. 5.
The Trojan,
glad
with sight of hostile blood.
Dryden.
He,
glad
of her attention gained.
Milton.
As we are now
glad
to behold your eyes.
Shakespeare
Glad
am I that your highness is so armed.
Shakespeare
Glad on ’t
,
glad of it.
[Colloq.]
Shak.
2.
Wearing a gay or bright appearance; expressing or exciting joy; producing gladness; exhilarating.
Her conversation
More
glad
to me than to a miser money is.
Sir P. Sidney.
Syn. – Pleased; gratified; exhilarated; animated; delighted; happy; cheerful; joyous; joyful; cheering; exhilarating; pleasing; animating.
Glad
,
Delighted
,
Gratified
. Delighted expresses a much higher degree of pleasure than glad. Gratified always refers to a pleasure conferred by some human agent, and the feeling is modified by the consideration that we owe it in part to another. A person may be glad or delighted to see a friend, and gratified at the attention shown by his visits.

Glad

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Gladded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Gladding
.]
[AS.
gladian
. See
Glad
,
Adj.
, and cf.
Gladden
,
Verb.
T.
]
To make glad; to cheer; to gladden; to exhilarate.
Chaucer.
That which
gladded
all the warrior train.
Dryden.
Each drinks the juice that
glads
the heart of man.
Pope.

Glad

,
Verb.
I.
To be glad; to rejoice.
[Obs.]
Massinger.

Webster 1828 Edition


Glad

GLAD

,
Adj.
[L. loetus, without a prefix.]
1.
Pleased; affected with pleasure or moderate joy; moderately happy.
A wise son maketh a glad father. Prov.10.
It is usually followed by of. I am glad of an opportunity to oblige my friend.
It is sometimes followed by at.
He that is glad at calamities shall not be unpunished. Prov.17.
It is sometimes followed by with.
The Trojan, glad with sight of hostile blood--
With, after glad, is unusual, and in this passage at would have been preferable.
2.
Cheerful; joyous.
They blessed the king, and went to their tents, joyful and glad of heart. 1 Kings 8.
3.
Cheerful; wearing the appearance of joy; as a glad countenance.
4.
Wearing a gay appearance; showy; bright.
The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them. Is.35.
Glad evening and glad morn crown'd the fourth day.
5.
Pleasing; exhilarating.
Her conversation
More glad to me than to a miser money is.
6.
Expressing gladness or joy; exciting joy.
Hark! a glad voice the lonely desert cheers.

GLAD

,
Verb.
T.
[The pret. and pp. gladed is not used. See Gladden.]
To make glad; to affect with pleasure; to cheer; to gladden; to exhilarate.
Each drinks the juice that glads the heart of man.

Definition 2022


glad

glad

See also: gläd and glað

English

Adjective

glad (comparative gladder or more glad, superlative gladdest or most glad)

  1. Pleased, happy, gratified.
    I'm glad the rain has finally stopped.
    • Bible, Proverbs x.1:
      A wise son maketh a glad father.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      Glad am I that your highness is so armed.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall, The Squire's Daughter, chapterII:
      "I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. I never did that. I always made up my mind I'd be a big man some day, and—I'm glad I didn't steal."
  2. (obsolete) Having a bright or cheerful appearance; expressing or exciting joy; producing gladness.
    • Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)
      Her conversation / More glad to me than to a miser money is.
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      Glad evening and glad morn crowned the fourth day.

Usage notes

The comparative "gladder" and superlative "gladdest" are not incorrect but may be unfamiliar enough to be taken as such. In both American and British English, the forms "more" and "most glad" are equally common in print and more common in daily speech.

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

glad (third-person singular simple present glads, present participle gladding, simple past and past participle gladded)

  1. (transitive) To make glad; to cheer; to gladden; to exhilarate.
    • Dryden
      that which gladded all the warrior train
    • Alexander Pope
      Each drinks the juice that glads the heart of man.
    • 1922, A. E. Housman, Epithalamium, line 3
      God that glads the lover's heart

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: horse · send · peace · #569: glad · hair · ran · important

Breton

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle Breton gloat (kingdom, wealth), from Proto-Brythonic *gwlad, from Proto-Celtic *wlatis (sovereignty), from pre-Celtic *wl̥H-ti-, deverbative of Proto-Indo-European *welH-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɑːt/

Noun

glad f (plural gladoù)

  1. arable land
  2. patrimony, estate
  3. (archaic) territory, country
  4. (archaic) feudal domain

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse glaðr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlad/, [ɡ̊lað]

Adjective

glad (neuter glad, e-form glade, comparative gladere, superlative (predicative) gladest, superlative (attributive) }}})

  1. happy, glad

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣlɑt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Etymology

From Middle Dutch glat, from Old Dutch *glad, from Proto-Germanic *gladaz.

Adjective

glad (comparative gladder, superlative gladst)

  1. smooth, polished
  2. slippery

Inflection

Inflection of glad
uninflected glad
inflected gladde
comparative gladder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial glad gladder het gladst
het gladste
indefinite m./f. sing. gladde gladdere gladste
n. sing. glad gladder gladste
plural gladde gladdere gladste
definite gladde gladdere gladste
partitive glads gladders

Derived terms


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse glaðr

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɽɑː/, IPA(key): /ɡlɑː/

Adjective

glad (neuter singular glad, definite singular and plural glade, comparative gladere, indefinite superlative gladest, definite superlative gladeste)

  1. happy, glad

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse glaðr

Adjective

glad (neuter singular glad, definite singular and plural glade, comparative gladare, indefinite superlative gladast, definite superlative gladaste)

  1. happy, glad

References


Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gladaz

Adjective

glad

  1. glad

Declension



Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *goldъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlâːd/

Noun

glȃd f (Cyrillic spelling гла̑д)

  1. hunger

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish glaþer, from Old Norse glaðr, from Proto-Germanic *gladaz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰladʰ-, derivation of Proto-Indo-European *gʰel- (to shine).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡlɑːd/

Adjective

glad (comparative gladare, superlative gladast)

  1. happy, glad

Declension

Inflection of glad
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular glad gladare gladast
Neuter singular glatt gladare gladast
Plural glada gladare gladast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 glade gladare gladaste
All glada gladare gladaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.