Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Frame

Frame

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Framed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Framing
.]
[OE.
framen
,
fremen
, to execute, build, AS.
fremman
to further, perform, effect, fr.
fram
strong, valiant; akin to E.
foremost
, and prob. to AS.
fram
from, Icel.
fremja
,
frama
, to further,
framr
forward, G.
fromm
worthy, excellent, pious. See
Foremost
,
From
, and cf.
Furnish
.]
1.
(Arch. & Engin.)
To construct by fitting and uniting the several parts of the skeleton of any structure; specifically, in woodwork, to put together by cutting parts of one member to fit parts of another. See
Dovetail
,
Halve
,
Verb.
T.
,
Miter
,
Tenon
,
Tooth
,
Tusk
,
Scarf
, and
Splice
.
2.
To originate; to plan; to devise; to contrive; to compose; in a bad sense, to invent or fabricate, as something false.
How many excellent reasonings are
framed
in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years.
I. Watts.
3.
To fit to something else, or for some specific end; to adjust; to regulate; to shape; to conform.
And
frame
my face to all occasions.
Shakespeare
We may in some measure
frame
our minds for the reception of happiness.
Landor.
The human mind is
framed
to be influenced.
I. Taylor.
4.
To cause; to bring about; to produce.
[Obs.]
Fear
frames
disorder, and disorder wounds.
Shakespeare
5.
To support.
[Obs. & R.]
That on a staff his feeble steps did
frame
.
Spenser.
6.
To provide with a frame, as a picture.

Frame

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To shape; to arrange, as the organs of speech.
[Obs.]
Judg. xii. 6.
2.
To proceed; to go.
[Obs.]
The bauty of this sinful dame
Made many princes thither
frame
.
Shakespeare

Frame

,
Noun.
1.
Anything composed of parts fitted and united together; a fabric; a structure; esp., the constructional system, whether of timber or metal, that gives to a building, vessel, etc., its model and strength; the skeleton of a structure.
These are thy glorious works, Parent of good,
Almighty! thine this universal
frame
.
Milton.
2.
The bodily structure; physical constitution; make or build of a person.
Some bloody passion shakes your very
frame
.
Shakespeare
No
frames
could be strong enough to endure it.
Prescott.
4.
(Mach.)
A term applied, especially in England, to certain machines built upon or within framework;
as, a stocking
frame
; lace
frame
; spinning
frame
, etc.
5.
Form; shape; proportion; scheme; structure; constitution; system;
as, a
frame
of government
.
She that hath a heart of that fine
frame

To pay this debt of love but to a brother.
Shakespeare
Put your discourse into some
frame
.
Shakespeare
7.
Contrivance; the act of devising or scheming.
[Obs.]
John the bastard
Whose spirits toil in
frame
of villainies.
Shakespeare
Balloon frame
,
Cant frames
,
etc. See under
Balloon
,
Cant
, etc.
Frame building
or
Frame house
,
a building of which the form and support is made of framed timbers.
[U.S.]
Frame level
,
a mason’s level.
Frame saw
,
a thin saw stretched in a frame to give it rigidity.

Webster 1828 Edition


Frame

FRAME

,
Verb.
T.
[L. armus, Eng. arm.]
1.
To fit or prepare and unite several parts in a regular structure or entire thing; to fabricate by orderly construction and union of various parts; as, to frame a house or other building.
2.
To fit one thing to another; to adjust; to make suitable.
3.
To make; to compose; as, to frame a law.
For thou art framed of the firm truth of valor.
4.
To regulate; to adjust; to shape; to conform; as, to frame our lives according to the rules of the gospel.
5.
To form and digest by thought; as, to frame ideas in the mind.
How many excellent reasonings are framed in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years!
6.
To contrive; to plan; to devise; as, to frame a project or design.
7.
To invent; to fabricate, in a bad sense; as, to frame a story or lie.

FRAME

,
Verb.
I.
To contrive. Judges 12:6.

FRAME

, n.
1.
The timbers of an edifice fitted and joined in the form proposed, for the purpose of supporting the covering; as the frame of a house, barn, bridge or ship.
2.
Any fabric or structure composed of parts united; as the frame of an ox or horse. So we say, the frame of the heavenly arch; the frame of the world.
3.
Any kind of case or structure made for admitting, inclosing or supporting things; as the frame of a window, door, picture or looking glass.
4.
Among printers, a stand to support the cases in which the types are distributed.
5.
Among founders, a kind of ledge, inclosing a board, which being filled with wet sand, serves as a mold for castings.
6.
A sort of loom on which linen, silk, &c. is stretched for quilting or embroidering.
7.
Order; regularity; adjusted series or composition of parts. We say, a person is out of frame; the mind is not in a good frame.
Your steady soul preserves her frame.
8.
Form; scheme; structure; constitution; system; as a frame of government.
9.
Contrivance; projection.
John the bastard, whose spirits toil in frame of villainies.
10.
Shape; form; proportion.

Definition 2021


Frame

Frame

See also: frame

German

Noun

Frame n

  1. (animation) frame, division of time on a multimedia timeline

frame

frame

See also: Frame

English

Verb

frame (third-person singular simple present frames, present participle framing, simple past and past participle framed)

  1. (transitive) To fit, as for a specific end or purpose; make suitable or comfortable; adapt; adjust.
    • John Lyly
      I will hereafter frame myself to be coy.
    • Shakespeare
      frame my face to all occasions
    • Landor
      We may in some measure frame our minds for the reception of happiness.
    • I. Taylor
      The human mind is framed to be influenced.
  2. (transitive) To construct by fitting or uniting together various parts; fabricate by union of constituent parts.
  3. (transitive) To bring or put into form or order; adjust the parts or elements of; compose; contrive; plan; devise.
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      He began to frame the loveliest countenance he could.
    • I. Watts
      How many excellent reasonings are framed in the mind of a man of wisdom and study in a length of years.
  4. (transitive) Of a constructed object such as a building, to put together the structural elements.
    Once we finish framing the house, we'll hang tin on the roof.
  5. (transitive) Of a picture such as a painting or photograph, to place inside a decorative border.
  6. (transitive) To position visually within a fixed boundary.
    The director frames the fishing scene very well.
  7. (transitive) To construct in words so as to establish a context for understanding or interpretation.
    How would you frame your accomplishments?
    The way the opposition has framed the argument makes it hard for us to win.
  8. (transitive, criminology) Conspire to incriminate falsely a presumably innocent person.
    The gun had obviously been placed in her car in an effort to frame her.
  9. (intransitive, dialectal, mining) To wash ore with the aid of a frame.
  10. (intransitive, dialectal) To move.
    An oath, and a threat to set Throttler on me if I did not frame off, rewarded my perseverance. ― E. Brontë.
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To proceed; to go.
    • Shakespeare
      The beauty of this sinful dame / Made many princes thither frame.
  12. (tennis) To hit (the ball) with the frame of the racquet rather than the strings (normally a mishit).
  13. (transitive, obsolete) To strengthen; refresh; support.
    At last, with creeping crooked pace forth came / An old, old man, with beard as white as snow, / That on a staffe his feeble steps did frame. ― Spenser.
  14. (transitive, obsolete) To execute; perform.
    All have sworn him an oath that they should frame his will on earth.
    The silken tackle / Swell with the touches of those flower-soft hands / That yarely frame the office. ― Shakespeare.
  15. (transitive, obsolete) To cause; to bring about; to produce.
    • Shakespeare
      Fear frames disorder, and disorder wounds.
  16. (intransitive, obsolete) To profit; avail.
  17. (intransitive, obsolete) To fit; accord.
    When thou hast turned them all ways, and done thy best to hew them and to make them frame, thou must be fain to cast them out. ― Tyndale.
  18. (intransitive, obsolete) To succeed in doing or trying to do something; manage.

Synonyms

  • (conspire to incriminate): fit up

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

A picture frame.
A bicycle frame (diamond frame).

frame (plural frames)

  1. The structural elements of a building or other constructed object.
    Now that the frame is complete, we can start on the walls.
  2. Anything composed of parts fitted and united together; a fabric; a structure.
    • Milton
      These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, / Almighty! thine this universal frame.
  3. The structure of a person's body.
    His starved flesh hung loosely on his once imposing frame.
  4. A rigid, generally rectangular mounting for paper, canvas or other flexible material.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.
    The painting was housed in a beautifully carved frame.
  5. A piece of photographic film containing an image.
    • 12 July 2012, Sam Adams, AV Club Ice Age: Continental Drift
      Jokes are recycled so frequently, it’s as if comedy writing was eating a hole in the ozone layer: If the audience had a nickel for every time a character on one side of the frame says something could never happen as it simultaneously happens on the other side of the frame, they’d have enough to pay the surcharge for the movie’s badly implemented 3-D.
    A film projector shows many frames in a single second.
  6. A context for understanding or interpretation.
    In this frame, it's easy to ask the question that the investigators missed.
  7. (snooker) A complete game of snooker, from break-off until all the balls (or as many as necessary to win) have been potted.
  8. (networking) An independent chunk of data sent over a network.
  9. (bowling) A set of balls whose results are added together for scoring purposes. Usually two balls, but only one ball in the case of a strike, and three balls in the case of a strike or a spare in the last frame of a game.
  10. (philately) The outer decorated portion of a stamp's image, often repeated on several issues although the inner picture may change.
  11. (philately) The outer circle of a cancellation mark.
  12. (film, animation, video games) A division of time on a multimedia timeline, such as 1/30th or 1/60th of a second.
  13. (Internet) An individually scrollable region of a webpage.
  14. (baseball, slang) An inning.
  15. (engineering, dated, chiefly Britain) Any of certain machines built upon or within framework.
    a stocking frame; a lace frame; a spinning frame
  16. (dated) frame of mind; disposition
    to be always in a happy frame
  17. (obsolete) Contrivance; the act of devising or scheming.
    • Shakespeare
      John the bastard / Whose spirits toil in frame of villainies.
  18. (dated, video games) A stage or level of a video game.
    • 1982, Gilsoft International, Mongoose (video game instructions)
      When you play the game it will draw a set pattern depending on the frame you are on, with random additions to the pattern, to give a different orchard each time.
  19. (genetics: reading frame) A way of dividing nucleotide sequences into a set of consecutive triplets.

Quotations

  • 1696, William Stephens, An Account of the Growth of Deism in England, page 17:
    ...It regulates and governs the Passions of the Mind, and brings them into due moderation and frame...

Translations

Derived terms


Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology

Borrowing from English frame.

Noun

frame n (plural frames, diminutive framepje n)

  1. (snooker) frame
  2. (construction) frame

Anagrams


Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowing from English frame.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfɹejm/, /ˈfɾejm/, /ˈfɾej.mi/

Noun

frame m (plural frames)

  1. (networking) frame (independent chunk of data)
  2. (Internet) frame (individually scrollable region of a webpage)
  3. frame (individual image emited by a projector or monitor)