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Webster 1913 Edition


Accord

Ac-cord′

,
Noun.
[OE.
acord
,
accord
, OF.
acort
,
acorde
, F.
accord
, fr. OF.
acorder
, F.
accorder
. See
Accord
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
Agreement or concurrence of opinion, will, or action; harmony of mind; consent; assent.
A mediator of an
accord
and peace between them.
Bacon.
These all continued with one
accord
in prayer.
Acts i. 14.
2.
Harmony of sounds; agreement in pitch and tone; concord;
as, the
accord
of tones
.
Those sweet
accords
are even the angels’ lays.
Sir J. Davies.
3.
Agreement, harmony, or just correspondence of things;
as, the
accord
of light and shade in painting
.
4.
Voluntary or spontaneous motion or impulse to act; – preceded by own;
as, of one's own
accord
.
That which groweth of its own
accord
of thy harvest thou shalt not reap.
Lev. xxv. 5.
Of his own
accord
he went unto you.
2 Cor. vii. 17.
5.
(Law)
An agreement between parties in controversy, by which satisfaction for an injury is stipulated, and which, when executed, bars a suit.
Blackstone.
With one accord
,
with unanimity.
They rushed
with one accord
into the theater.
Acts xix. 29.

Ac-cord′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Accorded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
According
.]
[OE.
acorden
,
accorden
, OF.
acorder
, F.
accorder
, fr. LL.
accordare
; L.
ad
+
cor
,
cordis
, heart. Cf.
Concord
,
Discord
, and see
Heart
.]
1.
To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust; – followed by to.
[R.]
Her hands
accorded
the lute's music to the voice.
Sidney.
2.
To bring to an agreement, as persons; to reconcile; to settle, adjust, harmonize, or compose, as things;
as, to
accord
suits or controversies
.
When they were
accorded
from the fray.
Spenser.
All which particulars, being confessedly knotty and difficult can never be
accorded
but by a competent stock of critical learning.
South.
3.
To grant as suitable or proper; to concede; to award;
as, to
accord
to one due praise
.
According his desire.”
Spenser.

Ac-cord′

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To agree; to correspond; to be in harmony; – followed by with, formerly also by to;
as, his disposition
accords
with his looks
.
My heart
accordeth
with my tongue.
Shakespeare
Thy actions to thy words
accord
.
Milton.
2.
To agree in pitch and tone.

Webster 1828 Edition


Accord

ACCORD'

, n.The Lat. has concors, concordo.
1.
Agreement; harmony of minds; consent or concurrence of opinions or wills.
They all continued with one accord in prayer. Acts, 1.
2.
Concert; harmony of sounds; the union of different sounds, which is agreeable to the ear; agreement in pitch and tone; as the accord of notes; but in this sense, it is more usual to employ concord or chord.
3.
Agreement; just correspondence of things; as the accord of light and shade in painting.
4.
Will; voluntary or spontaneous motion; used of the will of persons, or the natural motion of other bodies, and preceded by own.
Being more forward of his own accord. 2Cor. 8.
That which groweth of its own accord thou shall not reap. Lev. 25.
5.
Adjustment of a difference; reconciliation.
The mediator of an accord.
6.
In law, an agreement between parties in controversy, by which satisfaction for an injury is stipulated, and which, when executed, bars a suit.
7.
Permission, leave.

ACCORD'

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To make to agree, or correspond; to adjust one thing to another.
Her hands accorded the lute's music to the voice.
2.
To being to an agreement; to settle, adjust or compose; as to accord suits or controversies.

Definition 2022


accord

accord

English

Noun

accord (plural accords)

  1. Agreement or concurrence of opinion, will, or action.
  2. A harmony in sound, pitch and tone; concord.
    • 17th century, Sir John Davies, The Self-Subsistence of the Soul:
      Those sweet accords are even the angels' lays.
  3. Agreement or harmony of things in general.
    the accord of light and shade in painting
  4. (law) An agreement between parties in controversy, by which satisfaction for an injury is stipulated, and which, when executed, prevents a lawsuit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Blackstone to this entry?)
  5. (international law) An international agreement.
    The Geneva Accord of 1954 ended the French-Indochinese War.
  6. (obsolete) Assent
  7. Voluntary or spontaneous impulse to act.
    Nobody told me to do it. I did it of my own accord.
    • Bible, Leviticus xxv. 5
      That which groweth of its own accord of thy harvest thou shalt not reap.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

accord (third-person singular simple present accords, present participle according, simple past and past participle accorded)

  1. (transitive) To make to agree or correspond; to suit one thing to another; to adjust.
  2. (transitive) To bring (people) to an agreement; to reconcile, settle, adjust or harmonize.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, Book III:
      But Satyrane forth stepping, did them stay / And with faire treatie pacifide their ire, / Then when they were accorded from the fray []
    • (Can we date this quote?), Robert South, (Please provide the title of the work):
      all which particulars, being confessedly knotty and difficult, can never be accorded but by a competent stock of critical learning
  3. (intransitive) To agree or correspond; to be in harmony.
  4. (intransitive) To agree in pitch and tone.
  5. (transitive, dated, law) To grant as suitable or proper; to concede or award.
    • 1951, United Nations, Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, article 14:
      In respect of the protection of industrial property, [] a refugee shall be accorded in the country in which he has his habitual residence the same protection as is accorded to nationals of that country.
  6. (intransitive, obsolete) To give consent.
  7. (intransitive, archaic) To arrive at an agreement.
Translations

Derived terms


French

Etymology

Derived from the verb accorder.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /a.kɔʁ/

Noun

accord m (plural accords)

  1. chord
  2. agreement

Derived terms

Anagrams


Norman

Noun

accord m (plural accords)

  1. (Jersey) agreement