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Webster 1913 Edition


Abhor

Ab-hor′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Abhorred
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Abhorring
.]
[L.
abhorrere
;
ab
+
horrere
to bristle, shiver, shudder: cf. F.
abhorrer
. See
Horrid
.]
1.
To shrink back with shuddering from; to regard with horror or detestation; to feel excessive repugnance toward; to detest to extremity; to loathe.
Abhor
that which is evil; cleave to that which is good.
Rom. xii. 9.
2.
To fill with horror or disgust.
[Obs.]
It doth
abhor
me now I speak the word.
Shakespeare
3.
(Canon Law)
To protest against; to reject solemnly.
[Obs.]
I utterly
abhor
, yea, from my soul
Refuse you for my judge.
Shakespeare
Syn. – To hate; detest; loathe; abominate. See
Hate
.

Ab-hor′

,
Verb.
I.
To shrink back with horror, disgust, or dislike; to be contrary or averse; – with
from.
[Obs.]
“To abhor from those vices.”
Udall.
Which is utterly
abhorring
from the end of all law.
Milton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Abhor

ABHOR'

,
Verb.
T.
[L abhorreo, of ab and horreo, to set up bristles, shiver or shake; to look terrible.]
1.
To hate extremely, or with contempt; to lothe, detest or abominate.
2.
To despise or neglect. Ps. xxii. 24. Amos vi. 8.
3.
To cast off or reject. Ps. lxxix. 38.

Definition 2021


abhor

abhor

English

Verb

abhor (third-person singular simple present abhors, present participle abhorring, simple past and past participle abhorred)

  1. (transitive) To regard with horror or detestation; to shrink back with shuddering from; to feel excessive repugnance toward; to detest to extremity; to loathe. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).][2]
    • 1611, Romans 12:9, King James Bible:
      Abhor that which is evil; cleave to that which is good.
  2. (transitive, obsolete, impersonal) To fill with horror or disgust. [Attested from the mid 16th century until the early 17th century.][2]
  3. (transitive) To turn aside or avoid; to keep away from; to reject.
  4. (transitive, canon law, obsolete) To protest against; to reject solemnly.
    • c. 1613 William Shakespeare, Henry VIII, act 2, scene 4:
      I utterly abhor, yea, from my soul Refuse you for my judge.
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To shrink back with horror, disgust, or dislike; to be contrary or averse; construed with from. [Attested from the mid 16th century until the mid 17th century.][2]
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Udall to this entry?):
      To abhor from those vices.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?):
      Which is utterly abhorring from the end of all law.
  6. (intransitive, obsolete) Differ entirely from. [Attested from the mid 16th century until the late 17th century.][2]

Conjugation

Synonyms

Related terms

Translations

References

  • abhor in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • abhor in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  1. Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], ISBN 0550142304), page 2
  2. 1 2 3 4 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 4