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Webster 1913 Edition


Disgust

Dis-gust′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Disgusted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Disgusting
.]
[OF.
desgouster
, F.
dégoûter
; pref.
des-
(L.
dis-
) +
gouster
to taste, F.
goûter
, fr. L.
gustare
, fr.
gustus
taste. See
Gust
to taste.]
To provoke disgust or strong distaste in; to cause (any one) loathing, as of the stomach; to excite aversion in; to offend the moral taste of; – often with at, with, or by.
To
disgust
him with the world and its vanities.
Prescott.
Ærius is expressly declared . . . to have been
disgusted
at failing.
J. H. Newman.
Alarmed and
disgusted
by the proceedings of the convention.
Macaulay.

Dis-gust′

,
Noun.
[Cf. OF.
desgoust
, F.
dégoût
. See
Disgust
,
Verb.
T.
]
Repugnance to what is offensive; aversion or displeasure produced by something loathsome; loathing; strong distaste; – said primarily of the sickening opposition felt for anything which offends the physical organs of taste; now rather of the analogous repugnance excited by anything extremely unpleasant to the moral taste or higher sensibilities of our nature;
as, an act of cruelty may excite
disgust
.
The manner of doing is more consequence than the thing done, and upon that depends the satisfaction or
disgust
wherewith it is received.
Locke.
Syn. – Nausea; loathing; aversion; distaste; dislike; disinclination; abomination. See
Dislike
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Disgust

DISGUST

,
Noun.
[L.]
1.
Disrelish; distaste; aversion to the taste of food or drink; an unpleasant sensation excited int he organs of taste by something disagreeable, and when extreme, producing loathing or nausea.
2.
Dislike; aversion; an unpleasant sensation in the mind excited by something offensive in the manners, conduct, language or opinions of others. Thus, obscenity in language and clownishness in behavior excite disgust.

DISGUST

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To excite aversion in the stomach; to offend the taste.
2.
To displease; to offend the mind or moral taste; with at or with; as, to be disgusted at foppery, or with vulgar manners. To disgust from is unusual and hardly legitimate.

Definition 2021


disgust

disgust

English

Verb

disgust (third-person singular simple present disgusts, present participle disgusting, simple past and past participle disgusted)

  1. To cause an intense dislike for something.
    It disgusts me, to see her chew with her mouth open.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter V
      It is impossible to convey, in words, any idea of the hideous phantasmagoria of shifting limbs and faces which moved through the evil-smelling twilight of this terrible prison-house. Callot might have drawn it, Dante might have suggested it, but a minute attempt to describe its horrors would but disgust. There are depths in humanity which one cannot explore, as there are mephitic caverns into which one dare not penetrate.

Translations

Noun

disgust (uncountable)

  1. An intense dislike or loathing someone feels for something bad or nasty.
    With an air of disgust, she stormed out of the room.

Translations