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Webster 1913 Edition


Imply

Im-ply′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Implied
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Implying
.]
[From the same source as employ. See
Employ
,
Ply
, and cf.
Implicate
,
Apply
.]
1.
To infold or involve; to wrap up.
[Obs.]
“His head in curls implied.”
Chapman.
2.
To involve in substance or essence, or by fair inference, or by construction of law, when not include virtually;
as, war
implies
fighting
.
Where a malicious act is proved, a malicious intention is
implied
.
Bp. Sherlock.
When a man employs a laborer to work for him, . . . the act of hiring
implies
an obligation and a promise that he shall pay him a reasonable reward for his services.
Blackstone.
3.
To refer, ascribe, or attribute.
[Obs.]
Whence might this distaste arise?
Syn. – To involve; include; comprise; import; mean; denote; signify; betoken. See
Involve
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Imply

IMPLY'

,
Verb.
T.
[L. implico; in and plico, to fold. See Implicate.]
1.
Literally, to infold or involve; to wrap up.
2.
To involve or contain in substance or essence, or by fair inference, or by construction of law, when not expressed in words.
Where a malicious act is proved, a malicious intention is implied.
When a man employs a laborer to work for him, or an agent to transact business for him, the act of hiring implies an obligation,and a promise that he shall pay him a reasonable reward for his services. Contracts are express or implied; express contracts are those in which an agreement or promise is expressed by words or in writing; implied contracts are such as arise from the presumption of law, or the justice and reason of the transaction.

Definition 2022


imply

imply

English

Verb

imply (third-person singular simple present implies, present participle implying, simple past and past participle implied)

  1. (transitive, of a proposition) to have as a necessary consequence
    The proposition that "all dogs are mammals" implies that my dog is a mammal
  2. (transitive, of a person) to suggest by logical inference
    When I state that your dog is brown, I am not implying that all dogs are brown
  3. (transitive, of a person or proposition) to hint; to insinuate; to suggest tacitly and avoid a direct statement
    What do you mean "we need to be more careful with hygiene"? Are you implying that I don't wash my hands?
  4. (archaic) to enfold, entangle.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.iv:
      And in his bosome secretly there lay / An hatefull Snake, the which his taile vptyes / In many folds, and mortall sting implyes.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

Related terms

Translations

See also

External links

  • imply in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • imply in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911